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RE: [Authentic_SCA] "The Celts" by Gerhard Herm

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  • Jeff Gedney
    On Saturday, June 30, 2001 10:21 AM, atterlep@cs.com [SMTP:atterlep@cs.com] wrote: In a message dated 6/29/01 3:09:23 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 2, 2001
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      On Saturday, June 30, 2001 10:21 AM, atterlep@... [SMTP:atterlep@...]
      wrote:
      > In a message dated 6/29/01 3:09:23 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
      > Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com writes:
      >
      >
      > > (Source: "the Celts" by Gerhard Herm, a _very_ good book on premedieval
      > > Europe.)
      >
      > I found "The Celts" to be quite bad. Herm made a lot of guesses, some of
      the
      > based on no evidence, and presented them as fact. I read this book only
      > once, and a couple of years ago, but I remember it as one of the worst
      > popular histories I've ever read, filled with tripe.
      >
      > Fairfax
      > << File: ATT00002.html >>
      As were many books of the same period. It is hard to find one book on
      Indoeuropean cultures from that time that does not have some kind of agenda
      to sell. Reference anything by Ms. Gimbutas.
      I know that Herm was trying to take the history and make it "readable" thus
      making some of his narrative "crap". But the political thrust and flow of
      the gross history he is recreating is well supported with referential
      statements. The book was useful in that he is well supported with
      searchable quotes and checkable references and traceable illustrations.
      That is the chief treasure of this book. Certainly true that he attempts
      to read the minds of the historical personae, and sometimes he trys to
      "paint illustrations" and fabricates details for some scenes based wholly
      on conjecture, but these incidences are obvious from the "storytelling
      tone" of the passage, and the lack of referential statements.
      I still think that it is a pretty good book, for all it's faults.

      elias
    • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
      Constance, Thanks for my scores. They arrived on Saturday while I was at Boarder Raids. :^D I appreciate your sending them and keeping them safe. Smiles,
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 2, 2001
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        Constance,
        Thanks for my scores.  They arrived on Saturday while I was at Boarder Raids.  :^D  I appreciate your sending them and keeping them safe. 

        Smiles,
        Despina


        "Re-creation necessarily implies research before the craftwork
        starts. If you haven't done the research, you can create, but you
        cannot possibly RE-create." [Arval d'Espas Nord]
      • Jeff Gedney
        ... In any case the reference to the salt man is well known and holds up. (though the mid 1800 s date I referred to is off by a hundred years)
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 2, 2001
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          > >
          > > I found "The Celts" to be quite bad. Herm made a lot of guesses, some of
          > the
          > > based on no evidence, and presented them as fact. I read this book only
          > > once, and a couple of years ago, but I remember it as one of the worst
          > > popular histories I've ever read, filled with tripe.
          > >
          In any case the reference to the salt man is well known and holds up.
          (though the mid 1800's date I referred to is off by a hundred years)

          http://www.salzbergwerke.com/traces.htm

          Elias
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