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Period cures for maladies (was: Re: French byname)

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  • s_krasley@recordtrak.com
    - ... I guess it really is a case of if it doesn t kill you then it can only make you stronger. Natural selection? ... I m not one for prayers, but I do think
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
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      -
      >
      > --- s_krasley@r... wrote:
      > >
      > > Looking over some of these cures, I'm amased they
      > > the human species actually survived to make it to
      > > the 21st century.
      > I'm not. I've seen too many people fall for the old
      > "Ewww. Here, taste this. It's awful!"

      I guess it really is a case of if it doesn't kill you then it can
      only make you stronger. Natural selection?

      >
      > > Sure lets just rub Mercury on ourselves...and while
      > > we are at it lets ingest some arsenic for good
      > > measure...also do not forget your favorite saints
      > > medal just incase the "Cure" doesn't work.
      > Mom's been an RN since 1953, however, that never
      > stopped her from wearing medals, lighting candles and
      > dousing the entire family with Lourdes water when one
      > of us was sick. Just in case.
      >
      > Jehanne

      I'm not one for prayers, but I do think that the human mind can do
      wonders to heal it's body. If medals, prayer, holy water serve as a
      way to focus that energy all the better. Still I think I'll leave out
      the mercury and arsenic in any ancient reciepe.
      - Brynn
    • Kirrily Robert
      ... I don t know. It s possible that some of these cures might have a tiny core of usefulness. Taking poison to drive out disease is basically what
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
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        In lists.sca.authentic-sca, you wrote:
        >
        >Looking over some of these cures, I'm amased they the human species
        >actually survived to make it to the 21st century. However I'm sure
        >several hundred years from now, other will think the same about us.
        >Sure lets just rub Mercury on ourselves...and while we are at it lets
        >ingest some arsenic for good measure...also do not forget your
        >favorite saints medal just incase the "Cure" doesn't work.

        I don't know. It's possible that some of these cures might have a tiny
        core of usefulness.

        Taking poison to drive out disease is basically what chemotherapy is.
        You just have to hope that it kills the cancer before it kills the
        patient.

        I read something somewhere, fairly recently, that suggested that
        bleeding might actually be useful in some cases, because it kicks the
        body into "Yikes, I've lost some blood, let's get healing!" mode.

        And for that matter, the doctrine of humours isn't entirely whacko
        either. If you have a wet phlegmy cough and go to a modern pharmacist
        they'll give you something to dry it out; if you have a dry cough,
        they'll give you something to make it productive. If you have a fever,
        you take aspirin to reduce your temperature. The only thing different
        is that the medieval people didn't have aspirin, so they used "cool"
        herbs, which may have been considered "cool" either because of their
        actual medicinal properties, or because of some other reason entirely.
        They didn't have much of a scientific mindset, so they didn't perform
        double-blind experiments to see what effect each herb had, but
        presumably hundreds or thousands of years of informal observation would
        have led them to a viewpoint which, while not always correct, was
        somewhat better than total randomness.

        And then there's the placebo effect, and "faith healing", which are
        basically the same thing. The human mind can do strange things
        sometimes.

        Yours,

        Katherine

        --
        Kirrily 'Skud' Robert - skud@... - http://infotrope.net/
        "It's a teeny-weeny bit bigger than all the original files. For
        sufficiently large values of teeny-weeny."
        -- Sharkey teaches 'tar' in Unix Tools (from the Netizen quotes file)
      • s_krasley@recordtrak.com
        ... tiny ... That I don t doubt. It s just figuring out which of the ingredents is what is useful. ... is. ... I forgot about that. ... the ... I read that
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
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          > I don't know. It's possible that some of these cures might have a
          tiny
          > core of usefulness.

          That I don't doubt. It's just figuring out which of the ingredents is
          what is useful.

          > Taking poison to drive out disease is basically what chemotherapy
          is.
          > You just have to hope that it kills the cancer before it kills the
          > patient.

          I forgot about that.

          > I read something somewhere, fairly recently, that suggested that
          > bleeding might actually be useful in some cases, because it kicks
          the
          > body into "Yikes, I've lost some blood, let's get healing!" mode.

          I read that too, and that does make sense. Just don't bleed someone
          too much. And leeches are making a come back for treatment of severe
          bruises.


          > And for that matter, the doctrine of humours isn't entirely whacko
          > either. If you have a wet phlegmy cough and go to a modern
          pharmacist
          > they'll give you something to dry it out; if you have a dry cough,
          > they'll give you something to make it productive. If you have a
          fever,
          > you take aspirin to reduce your temperature. The only thing
          different
          > is that the medieval people didn't have aspirin, so they used "cool"
          > herbs, which may have been considered "cool" either because of their
          > actual medicinal properties, or because of some other reason
          entirely.

          If memory serve, willow bark and several other herbs have the same
          chemicals as aspirin just in much smaller amounts. I do like to try
          some of the old methods, like moist air to break up a cough. Cool
          clothes to help reduce a fever (along with some aspirin).

          > They didn't have much of a scientific mindset, so they didn't
          perform
          > double-blind experiments to see what effect each herb had, but
          > presumably hundreds or thousands of years of informal observation
          would
          > have led them to a viewpoint which, while not always correct, was
          > somewhat better than total randomness.

          I've really just started looking into some of the older rememdies for
          things. Mostly minor stuff, for on cuts or burns. Coughs and colds.
          since most over the counter drugs only treat the symptoms and not the
          illness, I figure I can do the same thing without the chemicals.

          >
          > And then there's the placebo effect, and "faith healing", which are
          > basically the same thing. The human mind can do strange things
          > sometimes.

          VERY TRUE
          >
          > Yours,
          >
          > Katherine
          >
          > --
          > Kirrily 'Skud' Robert - skud@i... - http://infotrope.net/
          > "It's a teeny-weeny bit bigger than all the original files. For
          > sufficiently large values of teeny-weeny."
          > -- Sharkey teaches 'tar' in Unix Tools (from the Netizen quotes
          file)
        • unclrashid@aol.com
          ... lets ... & Actually I beleive mercury componds were used to treat poxes until the development of modern antibiotics, and we may be going back there soon
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 2, 2001
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            --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., s_krasley@r... wrote:
            >
            > Looking over some of these cures, I'm amased they the human species
            > actually survived to make it to the 21st century. However I'm sure
            > several hundred years from now, other will think the same about us.
            > Sure lets just rub Mercury on ourselves...and while we are at it
            lets
            > ingest some arsenic for good measure...also do not forget your
            > favorite saints medal just incase the "Cure" doesn't work.
            > - Brynn
            >
            >
            > > Vittoria
            > > > >
            > > >For the french or spanish Pox:
            > > >Take quick-silver, and kill it with fasting spittle, then take
            > > >Verdigrease, Arabick, Turpentine, Oyl Olive, and Populion, & mix
            > them
            > > >together to one intire oyntment, and anoint the sores therewith,
            &

            Actually I beleive mercury componds were used to treat "poxes" until
            the development of modern antibiotics, and we may be going back there
            soon if more drug-resistant varieties arise, so I don't know how much
            more advanced we are.

            In more recent history, (19th & 20th century) almost any new
            discovery is beleived to be a panacea. Magnetism & Radiation for
            example. In the 30's they thought radium was good for you.

            Rashid
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