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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Linguistics question...

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  • Ingrid G. Storrø
    ... Just in case you re interested; in Norway the word has evolved into kagge , and is used in that form today to mean a small barrel. :) Ingrid -- Reality is
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
      Ariane Helou wrote:
      > Effingham wrote:

      > >KEG comes from the Anglo-Saxon KAG, which came from the Norse word KAGGI.
      >
      > Thank you! So it's a Germanic word and not a Celtic one. That answers my
      > question perfectly :)

      Just in case you're interested; in Norway the word has evolved into
      "kagge", and is used in that form today to mean a small barrel. :)

      Ingrid
      --
      Reality is for people who can't apply makeup.
    • Anthony J. Bryant
      ... A bit, yes. ... I think at one time or another most of us have had teachers like that. I still remember my 9th grade history teacher who talked of
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
        Ariane Helou wrote:

        > Effingham wrote:
        > >Did he say "joot" or "yoot"? <g>
        >
        > "Joot." Does that make him thoroughly uncouth? :)
        >

        A bit, yes. <G>

        >
        > >Didn't anyone think to look at a dictionary? Didn't your teacher even think of
        > >that?
        >
        > Well, I have to admit the thought crossed my mind, but my dictionaries are
        > in the boxes and boxes of stuff that are in the keeping of my very obliging
        > boyfriend until I move into my new place (and therefore inaccessible). And
        > yeah, the libraries and computers would be good resources too, but still,
        > the teacher didn't think of it and no one else in the class seemed to
        > care. But I do agree that most teachers would have immediately suggested
        > checking a dictionary. This one's a little...well...not the best I've ever
        > had :( Today he spent half an hour trying to get the class to understand a
        > very simple concept which most profs. could explain much more lucidly in
        > half that time...
        >

        I think at one time or another most of us have had teachers like that.

        I still remember my 9th grade history teacher who talked of people dying for their
        cause as "martee-ars" ("martyrs" I assume), and referring to a Rev War battle site
        as Fort "TickenderAHgah" (Oh, you mean "Tye-kon-der-OH-gah?") and had as one
        question on a test, "What year did the United States become independent from
        England?" I put down 1783, the year the treaty was signed. She marked it wrong,
        and said the correct answer was 1776. I pointed out that that was when the
        *Declaration* of Independence was written, and that *declaring* independence and
        *being* independent were two different things, yada yada yada. SHe called the
        principal, and when he heard what it was all about, told her I was right and she
        was wrong. When I watch "Boston Public," that teacher with the mental problem (the
        lady who keeps going off her meds) reminds me of her in *so* many ways.


        Effingham
      • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
        ... I don t even want to begin in the realm of conversation the number of students that liked me as a substitute teacher because I always was right when I gave
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
           had as one question on a test, "What year did the United States become independent from England?" I put down 1783, the year the treaty was signed. She marked it wrong, and said the correct answer was 1776. I pointed out that that was when the
          *Declaration* of Independence was written, and that declaring* independence and *being* independent were two different things, yada yada yada. SHe called the principal, and when he heard what it was all about, told her I was right and she
          was wrong.

          I don't even want to begin in the realm of conversation the number of students that liked me as a substitute teacher because I always was right when I gave them facts (and their teacher didn't).  And boy, did some of them try to prove me wrong just because I was the sub.

          When I did my student teaching, the eighth grade for the school (yes, I was a student teacher for eighth grade US history) went on a trip that included Gettysburg.  I did a 3 day lesson on it right before they left and my kids were correcting the guides and consistently proved right!  The principal was very impressed and the kids felt tremendously smart.  Mine were the only kids that could keep up with the flashing map of the battle, because they knew what had happened.  They kept having to tell the other kids what was going on.

          Despina who really did like teaching......




          When I watch "Boston Public," that teacher with the mental problem (the lady who keeps going off her meds) reminds me of her in *so* many ways.

          I think I'm more and more glad I don't watch television......
        • s_krasley@recordtrak.com
          ... that. LAst year near the end of school, the history teacher desided to show Braveheart . My Daughter who was a senior, wound up teaching the class showing
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
            > I think at one time or another most of us have had teachers like
            that.


            LAst year near the end of school, the history teacher desided to show
            "Braveheart". My Daughter who was a senior, wound up teaching the
            class showing them all of the historical as well as costuming
            mistakes that had been made in the movie.
            When the teacher asked her how she knew all of this, she nicely said
            "my mom and all of her books".

            Oh this is the same girl that got one of her teachers to quit.
            The women was teaching English. They were doing "Antigone".
            The teacher pronounced it AN-TEE-GONE, Jill kept correcting her.
            However when the teacher asked her how did she know, Jill's answer
            was, one of her gerbils is named AN-TIG-O-NE. And that she'd already
            read all the plays. Jill had a perverse delight in proving that
            particular teacher wrong at every turn.
            - Brynn
          • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
            Brynn, I *really* like your kid. Despina
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
              Brynn,

              I *really* like your kid.

              Despina

            • s_krasley@recordtrak.com
              ... She s my little Goth girl (But with white blonde hair). She was on the school paper and wrote an article on Wicca not Witchcraft . She and her sister
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
                > Brynn,
                >
                > I *really* like your kid.
                >
                > Despina

                She's my little "Goth" girl (But with white blonde hair). She was on
                the school paper and wrote an article on "Wicca not Witchcraft". She
                and her sister have sorts grown up with my obsession. Jill's friends
                use to discribe my interior decorating as looking like a Meatloaf
                video.
                - Brynn
              • caoilte
                ... Probably, but he s currently busy beung tied up on the back burner of Will s stove. I might let him loose again sometime when he learns what to wear.
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 1, 2001
                  Ariane Helou wrote:

                  > And Dorje (though isn't Caoilte more likely to know about this? ;) wrote:
                  >

                  Probably, but he's currently busy beung tied up on the back burner of Will's
                  stove. I might let him loose again sometime when he learns what to wear. (Blame
                  Kass)

                  Dorje
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