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Re: where to find bees wax for candle making demonstration

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  • Jen Dobyns
    Once upon a time I got the caps from the beekeepers at our local university. They are full of debris as well as the wax, you have to melt it all down in a
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 13, 2012
      Once upon a time I got the "caps" from the beekeepers at our local university. They are full of debris as well as the wax, you have to melt it all down in a pot of water and strain. The gunk falls to the bottom, what solidifies on the top as it cools is the wax, mostly. Repeating the process gets the wax cleaner. So getting the wax from these is fairly labor intensive, but it was free. You might check and see if your college has an entomology department with a beekeeping program.

      Genevieve

      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "christopher" <chris_kletke@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello,
      >
      > I am trying to do a candle making demonstration with our SCA group for our museum comes to life event. I am going to be making tallow and bees wax candles as both were period. Tallow part I'm fine with but finding a good source of bees wax has been hard that isn't an arm and a leg since I'm a poor college student. So any advice on finding inexpensive bees wax suppliers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
      >
      >
      > Chris
      >
    • gardinladi
      This may be a long shot, but do you know anyone who is on the Altar Guild or helps out at their church who still uses beeswax candles? As a teenager ours still
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 18, 2012
        This may be a long shot, but do you know anyone who is on the Altar Guild or helps out at their church who still uses beeswax candles? As a teenager ours still did, and the pillar candles were used until they were an inch or two high and too short for the holders then discarded or possibly given away.

        --Dame Jocelyn of Lutterworth




        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "christopher" <chris_kletke@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello,
        >
        > I am trying to do a candle making demonstration with our SCA group for our museum comes to life event. I am going to be making tallow and bees wax candles as both were period. Tallow part I'm fine with but finding a good source of bees wax has been hard that isn't an arm and a leg since I'm a poor college student. So any advice on finding inexpensive bees wax suppliers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
        >
        >
        > Chris
        >
      • christopher
        Ok I with your advice I found some really great sources of bees wax a few local bee keepers are going to give me their excess wax as it s for a good cause of
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 19, 2012
          Ok I with your advice I found some really great sources of bees wax a few local bee keepers are going to give me their excess wax as it's for a good cause of educating the public although I'll have to process the wax to make it usable should be an interesting experience. My next question is books or websites that show the method of making them and the history of candles so that I can give a synopsis of what historical wicks were used and how to construct them as I haven't really made any before. SO would you recommend any websites books that would give such information. Thanks again for all your advice I really appreciate it.

          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "gardinladi" <gardinladi@...> wrote:
          >
          > This may be a long shot, but do you know anyone who is on the Altar Guild or helps out at their church who still uses beeswax candles? As a teenager ours still did, and the pillar candles were used until they were an inch or two high and too short for the holders then discarded or possibly given away.
          >
          > --Dame Jocelyn of Lutterworth
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "christopher" <chris_kletke@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello,
          > >
          > > I am trying to do a candle making demonstration with our SCA group for our museum comes to life event. I am going to be making tallow and bees wax candles as both were period. Tallow part I'm fine with but finding a good source of bees wax has been hard that isn't an arm and a leg since I'm a poor college student. So any advice on finding inexpensive bees wax suppliers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
          > >
          > >
          > > Chris
          > >
          >
        • Diane Dooley
          Now you have me curious. If you ve never done this before, why choose it as a thing to demonstrate? I ve dipped candles before at a colonial village, and while
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 19, 2012
            Now you have me curious. If you've never done this before, why choose it as a thing to demonstrate? I've dipped candles before at a colonial village, and while *I* thought it was neat, I was that sort of weird kid. I'm not sure it would have sucked me in at a college demo. Not that I'm trying to dissuade you; I'm just curious as to the thought process.

            Tasha

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Jul 19, 2012, at 12:50, "christopher" <chris_kletke@...> wrote:

            > Ok I with your advice I found some really great sources of bees wax a few local bee keepers are going to give me their excess wax as it's for a good cause of educating the public although I'll have to process the wax to make it usable should be an interesting experience. My next question is books or websites that show the method of making them and the history of candles so that I can give a synopsis of what historical wicks were used and how to construct them as I haven't really made any before. SO would you recommend any websites books that would give such information. Thanks again for all your advice I really appreciate it.
            >
            > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "gardinladi" <gardinladi@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > This may be a long shot, but do you know anyone who is on the Altar Guild or helps out at their church who still uses beeswax candles? As a teenager ours still did, and the pillar candles were used until they were an inch or two high and too short for the holders then discarded or possibly given away.
            > >
            > > --Dame Jocelyn of Lutterworth
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "christopher" <chris_kletke@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hello,
            > > >
            > > > I am trying to do a candle making demonstration with our SCA group for our museum comes to life event. I am going to be making tallow and bees wax candles as both were period. Tallow part I'm fine with but finding a good source of bees wax has been hard that isn't an arm and a leg since I'm a poor college student. So any advice on finding inexpensive bees wax suppliers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Chris
            > > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • christopher
            MESSAGE SNIPPED BY MODERATOR SO AS NOT TO REPEAT THE FOUR PRECEDING POSTS. Well our group decided to do it and sounded interesting to me and I have about 4
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 19, 2012
              MESSAGE SNIPPED BY MODERATOR SO AS NOT TO REPEAT THE FOUR PRECEDING POSTS.

              Well our group decided to do it and sounded interesting to me and I have about 4 months to perfect my skills so I signed up to do it
            • Jessica M
              Just saw the post, I use beeswax to seal my period cheese. I buy it from here- http://www.cheesemaking.com/BeeswaxOnePound.html $12 a pound, if you need more
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 19, 2012
                Just saw the post, I use beeswax to seal my period cheese. I buy it from here- http://www.cheesemaking.com/BeeswaxOnePound.html

                $12 a pound, if you need more then a few contact them for a possible discount. Remember that you can charge a supply fee to students if they are keeping what they make in class...

                -Galiena

                --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "christopher" <chris_kletke@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello,
                >
                > I am trying to do a candle making demonstration with our SCA group for our museum comes to life event. I am going to be making tallow and bees wax candles as both were period. Tallow part I'm fine with but finding a good source of bees wax has been hard that isn't an arm and a leg since I'm a poor college student. So any advice on finding inexpensive bees wax suppliers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
                >
                >
                > Chris
                >
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