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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Hand sewing

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  • Brad Moore
    I have to agree with Ann, I admire all who hand sew, but personally I have always found it to be tedious.  I make a lot of garb, but most of it is made on the
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 17, 2011
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      I have to agree with Ann, I admire all who hand sew, but personally I have always found it to be tedious.  I make a lot of garb, but most of it is made on the machine.  I hand finish the bits which will show, but I've always been far more interested in construction than in the act of sewing.  I like seeing how the pieces go together, but don't have the extra time for making it totally by hand.


      Brad Moore 

      "If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world."
      - J.R.R. Tolkien

      From: annakaiara <gakaiaraan@...>
      To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, October 16, 2011 9:41 AM
      Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Hand sewing


       
      All my garb is machine sewn. I enjoy the speed and have never found machine sewing, done properly, to be less sturdy than hand sewing. I do enjoy the research and have plain silk waiting for natural dyes that in the near future I will use for the first time :) I am seeking out patterns for embroidery that are period for my garb, and this I do by hand. I'm also starting out to learn about weaving trims in an attempt to get closer to period. That said, it will probably be added by hand and by machine both.

      But I am seriously impressed by those of you who hand sew your garb!!

      Ann Seeton

      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Kareina Talvi Tyt�r <kareina.sca@...> wrote:
      > I, too, love hand sewing. I do not own a piece of
      > machine sewn garb....




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    • Tiffany Brown
      ... There are a few things about the fine details of the construction that you can only really experience by doing the sewing by hand. But in order to do this,
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 17, 2011
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        On 18 October 2011 05:00, Brad Moore <mamluk@...> wrote:

        > I hand finish the bits which will show, but I've always been far more
        > interested in construction than in the act of sewing. I like seeing how the
        > pieces go together, but don't have the extra time for making it totally by
        > hand.
        >

        There are a few things about the fine details of the construction that you
        can only really experience by doing the sewing by hand. But in order to do
        this, you need good handsewing, teh right materials, preferably no deadline
        for finishing and really good reports about the type of sewing you are
        trying to copy. Oh, and to find handsewing calming instead of an exercise in
        patience. It can be quite difficult to get all these prerequisites together
        at the same time.

        For a counter example though, I recall seeing a young lad from annother
        reenactment organisation trying to handsew his garments very very badly. It
        wasn't just that his skill was extremely unpractised, but that no-one had
        shown him how to do a single stitch type. He spent a lot of time making a
        garment which I'm sure would only last 2 wears (as I watched in astonishment
        and tried to show him some sewing tips). To my mind, this wasn't better
        recreation because the durability of the finished product (for everyday
        garments) is very much a part of the medievalness of a garment, and the
        fineness of the sewing is a contributor to this. If he's sewed the garment
        on a machine (or at least the main seams) the product would have been more
        medieval in that it would be fit for purpose than the poorly handsewn
        product. That said, he was learning a bit about wielding a needle
        (including bad habbits), but a lot less than a medieval girl learning at her
        mother's knee would.

        Teffania

        --
        . ___
        {o,o} The blog you are not looking for
        |)__) is definitely not at
        -"-"- http://teffania.blogspot.com


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      • Virginia Richards-Taylor
        I think hand sewing has one clear major advantage when doing it at an event: you don t have to hide (or look for an electricity source). There s also the issue
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 18, 2011
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          I think hand sewing has one clear major advantage when doing it at an event: you don't have to hide (or look for an electricity source). There's also the issue of material. With a nicely fulled, hand-woven wool twill, if machine sewn the seam and fabric looks something like a frankenstein's monster, puffy and odd. With hand stitching one can achieve an almost invisible join, if careful (and done in sunlight- I wouldn't try it by firelight with any fabric with a pattern). I think so much of it has to do with the material you are sewing. I wouldn't trust some finer gauzes to a machine when I wanted to hem a veil, and turning corners is hard even by hand. I'm perfectly willing to use my machine to join furs, but I want to attach them to the fabric by hand so that they lie properly. I think it's a question of which materials you are dealing with at any time- and practice, and technique (as others have said).

          I'll admit that I dearly love my modern needles though- thorn and bone may be more authentic, but I prefer the metal ones.
          Tchipakkan


          Feeling gratitude and not expressing it is like wrapping a present and not giving it --William Arthur Ward






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        • xina007eu
          Hi all, See the following article by Janet Arnold: An Edinburgh tailor s story in Costume, London, #10, 1976, pp 74 - 85. Janet Arnold (J.A. in the quote
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 19, 2011
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            Hi all,

            See the following article by Janet Arnold:
            "An Edinburgh tailor's story" in Costume, London, #10, 1976, pp 74 - 85.
            Janet Arnold (J.A. in the quote below) talks to Daniel Nelson (D.N.):

            "J .A. I remember an old tailor who taught us at art college. He showed us the difference between a back stitched seam and a machine stitched seam. He pulled them both very hard, and the machine stitching broke in two places, but the hand stitching held firm.
            D.N. There's an elasticity in hand sewing which is missing in machine stitching. [...]"

            The rest of the article is also very interesting, e.g. it shows how to draw the shape of an armscye using your hand as a template.

            Best regards,

            Christina



            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "jewett_christine" <dystopic@...> wrote:
            >
            > The sturdiness of the hand sewn vs. the machine sewn has a lot more to do with the skill of the sewer than the process, I think, but the approach to a garment when you hand sew it seems to be different, and you can reach into fussy bits easier. Also, have tidier ends. But maybe that was just my machine sewing! :P There are merits to both ways of doing it. I just find hand sewing gets along a lot better with me. :P
            >
          • Kareina Talvi Tytär
            ... I once purchased a hand-made iron needle which I loved--it was so small and fine that it slipped easily through even tightly woven fabrics. Sadly, such
            Message 5 of 12 , Oct 19, 2011
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              At 22:16 18/10/2011, Tchipakkan wrote:
              >
              >I'll admit that I dearly love my modern needles though- thorn and
              >bone may be more authentic, but I prefer the metal ones.

              I once purchased a hand-made iron needle which I loved--it was so
              small and fine that it slipped easily through even tightly woven
              fabrics. Sadly, such needles, despite being a joy to work with, are
              NOT meant to take pressure in any other direction. I knew better than
              to use the point of that needle to pick at a stitch that has already
              been made in an attempt to untie a minor knot in the thread, but one
              afternoon in a moment's inattention, I tried to do it anyway, and
              snapped my favourite needle in half.

              --Kareina
              PS I just checked the web page of the merchant from whom I got the
              iron needle, and it looks like she is carrying bronze these
              days:
              <http://shop.pallia.net/index.php/en/component/jshopping/category/view/2?Itemid=135>http://shop.pallia.net/index.php/en/component/jshopping/category/view/2?Itemid=135
              no idea if they will be as delicate with respect to sideways tension
              as the iron one was, nor if they are as tiny as that needle was.

              mobile phone +46 70 253 2443
              http://kareina.livejournal.com/
              http://www.facebook.com/reia.chmielowski
              http://a-life-long-scholar.blogspot.com/


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