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Re: 16th century trim

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  • SCA
    Sorry for my absence! I am a beginner at embroidery, Lady, but always willing to try. My husband is English, so that s the way we go for him no matter what
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 11 11:06 PM
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      Sorry for my absence! I am a beginner at embroidery, Lady, but always willing to try. My husband is English, so that's the way we go for him no matter what style I'm wearing.

      Chimera

      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Susan Meitzler <nerdgirl@...> wrote:
      >
      > OK 1545 from what area? And do you sew or can you embroider or do any
      > other fabric arts?
      > Lady Magdalena Von KDT
      >
      > On Jun 11, 2011, at 1:15 AM, SCA wrote:
      >
      > > Hi folks,
      > >
      > > I am trying to decide on what sort of trim I can use on my hubby's
      > > new doublet. Any suggestions for a nobleman's outfit around 1545?
      > > There is so much out there, I am feeling a bit confused on what
      > > would be appropriate!
      > >
      > > Chimera
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • SCA
      Sorry for the delay. Thank you for the advice, Susana. I did get some trim that has a running hart and floral scrolling. Chimera
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 11 11:08 PM
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        Sorry for the delay. Thank you for the advice, Susana. I did get some trim that has a running hart and floral scrolling.

        Chimera

        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Susanne Hibbert <thl.susana@...> wrote:
        >
        > When I want to find some "period looking" trim I find paintings of the time
        > frame, in color if possible, and I take a photo copy and blow up a part of the
        > painting showing the trim in detail. Then I take the the results with me to pick
        > out trim. I keep in mind the correct width of the trim and the general way it
        > looks. I also measure and add a bit more for the amount I will need for each
        > particular outfit. After a while your eye will get use to seeing useable trims,
        > and those that you should not use. Some times I see a trim that is usable and
        > get it, hoping to be inspired. Same goes for carrying a folder full of beautiful
        > portraits.....sometime the store's trims just jump out and look very much like
        > something shown in a portrait. I do not relie on memory since I might be buying
        > 10,20, or 30 yards of trim. After a while you might be able to tell what amount
        > you need. It is the same way with buttons. Some garments need a certain number
        > all the time. I love the expression on a new clerks face when I ask "how many
        > more can I get at you others stores and have them hold all of them for delivery
        > or pick up. When you need 40 buttons, you need 40 buttons!
        > There is also a good book called "Tak V Bowes Departed" a 15th Century Braiding
        > Manual examined. Many of the braid directions are do-able and where used in the
        > early 16th century for trim on doublet. If you do not want to make your own, it
        > is a good source of the kind of braiding to look for that would be "passable".
        > Susana
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: SCA <sca_chimera@...>
        > To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Fri, June 10, 2011 11:15:52 PM
        > Subject: [Authentic_SCA] 16th century trim
        >
        >
        > Hi folks,
        >
        > I am trying to decide on what sort of trim I can use on my hubby's new doublet.
        > Any suggestions for a nobleman's outfit around 1545? There is so much out there,
        > I am feeling a bit confused on what would be appropriate!
        >
        > Chimera
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Susanne Hibbert
        Chimera, I do hope you will make an attempt at making your own trim. I is time well spent. Trim can be re-used for another garment if you are careful to hand
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 12 7:58 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Chimera,
          I do hope you will make an attempt at making your own trim. I is time well spent. Trim can be re-used for another garment if you are careful to hand sew in place. It is easier to take out that machined on trim.
          Happy garment making
          THL Susana de el castillo
          Barony of Arn Hold



          ________________________________
          From: SCA <sca_chimera@...>
          To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, August 12, 2011 12:08 AM
          Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: 16th century trim


           
          Sorry for the delay. Thank you for the advice, Susana. I did get some trim that has a running hart and floral scrolling.

          Chimera

          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Susanne Hibbert <thl.susana@...> wrote:
          >
          > When I want to find some "period looking" trim I find paintings of the time
          > frame, in color if possible, and I take a photo copy and blow up a part of the
          > painting showing the trim in detail. Then I take the the results with me to pick
          > out trim. I keep in mind the correct width of the trim and the general way it
          > looks. I also measure and add a bit more for the amount I will need for each
          > particular outfit. After a while your eye will get use to seeing useable trims,
          > and those that you should not use. Some times I see a trim that is usable and
          > get it, hoping to be inspired. Same goes for carrying a folder full of beautiful
          > portraits.....sometime the store's trims just jump out and look very much like
          > something shown in a portrait. I do not relie on memory since I might be buying
          > 10,20, or 30 yards of trim. After a while you might be able to tell what amount
          > you need. It is the same way with buttons. Some garments need a certain number
          > all the time. I love the expression on a new clerks face when I ask "how many
          > more can I get at you others stores and have them hold all of them for delivery
          > or pick up. When you need 40 buttons, you need 40 buttons!
          > There is also a good book called "Tak V Bowes Departed" a 15th Century Braiding
          > Manual examined. Many of the braid directions are do-able and where used in the
          > early 16th century for trim on doublet. If you do not want to make your own, it
          > is a good source of the kind of braiding to look for that would be "passable".
          > Susana
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: SCA <sca_chimera@...>
          > To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Fri, June 10, 2011 11:15:52 PM
          > Subject: [Authentic_SCA] 16th century trim
          >
          >
          > Hi folks,
          >
          > I am trying to decide on what sort of trim I can use on my hubby's new doublet.
          > Any suggestions for a nobleman's outfit around 1545? There is so much out there,
          > I am feeling a bit confused on what would be appropriate!
          >
          > Chimera
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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