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Patching garments?

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  • Quokkaqueen
    Hi All, It s reached that stage in my garb wardrobe, where I need to start repairing things, mostly patching holes and tears in seams. I *know* that there are
    Message 1 of 17 , Oct 19, 2010
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      Hi All,

      It's reached that stage in my garb wardrobe, where I need to start repairing things, mostly patching holes and tears in seams. I *know* that there are garments out there with patches (the Y-piece on the Bocksten hood springs to mind), but what I'm having trouble is finding information on *how* garments were patched.

      I'm guessing that patches were sewn to the outside of the garment, but what happened on the inside? Were the edges of the repair hemmed facing inside the garment, or outside towards the patch? Were any special patching stitches used?

      Any help would be appreciated,
      ~Asfridhr
    • Heather Rose Jones
      My favorite place to start for patching techniques -- although it s a bit on the early side (7th c) -- is the Bernuthsfeld tunic. Almost more patches than
      Message 2 of 17 , Oct 19, 2010
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        My favorite place to start for patching techniques -- although it's a bit on the early side (7th c) -- is the Bernuthsfeld tunic. Almost more patches than original fabric. The most detailed look at it is in an article by Heidemarie Farke in NESAT 6.

        Heather Rose Jones

        On Oct 19, 2010, at 4:39 PM, "Quokkaqueen" <quokkaqueen@...> wrote:

        > Hi All,
        >
        > It's reached that stage in my garb wardrobe, where I need to start repairing things, mostly patching holes and tears in seams. I *know* that there are garments out there with patches (the Y-piece on the Bocksten hood springs to mind), but what I'm having trouble is finding information on *how* garments were patched.
        >
        > I'm guessing that patches were sewn to the outside of the garment, but what happened on the inside? Were the edges of the repair hemmed facing inside the garment, or outside towards the patch? Were any special patching stitches used?
        >
        > Any help would be appreciated,
        > ~Asfridhr
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > ----------------------------------------------------
        > This is the Authentic SCA eGroupYahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Terri Morgan
        ... ~Asfridhr I d be interested in learning that also. My first response, upon reading Asfridhr s speculation was to say, no, on the inside! because that is
        Message 3 of 17 , Oct 20, 2010
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          > I'm guessing that patches were sewn to the
          > outside of the garment, but what happened on
          > the inside? Were the edges of the repair
          > hemmed facing inside the garment, or outside
          > towards the patch? Were any special patching
          > stitches used?
          > Any help would be appreciated,
          ~Asfridhr

          I'd be interested in learning that also. My first response, upon reading
          Asfridhr's speculation was to say, "no, on the inside!" because that is the
          most common method I learned for darning/patching frayed fabric. But what I
          learned is modern... I never once gave a thought to what would have been a
          period practise.

          Hrothny
        • henrikofhavn
          Funny you should bring this up. I just got thru patching a pair of under trousers/ drawers. They are linen and have had several rips in them. Both in the half
          Message 4 of 17 , Oct 22, 2010
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            Funny you should bring this up. I just got thru patching a pair of under trousers/ drawers. They are linen and have had several rips in them. Both in the half feet ( at the heel) and in the butt/crotch joins where the seams are several layers thick and the fabric next to them gets split from stresses induced while riding horses.

            The whole garment is hand sewn with french and/or flat felled seams. The stitches are large - about 5 to 8 mm long, so some looseness in the seams exists. Whenever I get another tear, I remove the garment and repair it before washing it again. My method is to sew the rip together with edges just touching ( no overlap or gathering ). If a hole is present due to too much unraveling, or a piece is gone, I darn over it to consolidate the fabric. Then I find a scrap of fabric of the same color ( or close - I have a brown patch on a black garment , under the heel where it is hidden by my shoe) to make a patch from and cut it to overlap the repair area sufficiently. Then I sew it over the outside of the area and whip stitch the edges down, both to secure it in place as well as to prevent it from unraveling ( if it is worn under other layers, otherwise I would fold under the edges and make it neater).I then sew lines of running stitches about an inch apart all over the patch, to secure the center to the underlying fabric. It looks a bit crude, but works. I have been using this garment for nearly 10 years now, and so far I feel it is still got a lot more use left.

            I don't know how period my method is, but since it's not out for others to see, I'm content.

            Henrik of Havn

            ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Quokkaqueen" <quokkaqueen@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi All,
            >
            > It's reached that stage in my garb wardrobe, where I need to start repairing things, mostly patching holes and tears in seams. I *know* that there are garments out there with patches (the Y-piece on the Bocksten hood springs to mind), but what I'm having trouble is finding information on *how* garments were patched.
            >
            > I'm guessing that patches were sewn to the outside of the garment, but what happened on the inside? Were the edges of the repair hemmed facing inside the garment, or outside towards the patch? Were any special patching stitches used?
            >
            > Any help would be appreciated,
            > ~Asfridhr
            >
          • Quokkaqueen
            I found an example, so I ll answer my own question, too! In Lovlid, Dan Halvard. 2009. Nye Tanker om Skjoldehamnfunnet (Bergen University)
            Message 5 of 17 , Oct 23, 2010
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              I found an example, so I'll answer my own question, too!

              In Lovlid, Dan Halvard. 2009. "Nye Tanker om Skjoldehamnfunnet" (Bergen University)
              http://www.lofotr.no/pdf/Skjoldhamnfunnet/Nye%20tanker%20om%20Skjoldehamnfunnet.pdf

              pp. 96-7 describes the patches on the shirt from Skjoldehamn, in Norway:

              "Med unntak av lapp 3 er alle lappene utvendige. De utvendige lappene har for det meste blitt brettet inn før de har blitt sydd på, men enkelte steder har man latt de være ubrettet. Lappenes sømmer er oftest til dels grove kastesømmer i forskjellige garntyper, der Z2S er det vanligste."

              "With the exception of patch number 3, all of the patches are on the outside. The outside patches had mostly been folded-in before being sewn on, but in some places they were flat. The patch seams are usually roughly overcast in different yarn types, where Z2S is the most common."

              "Kastestingsømmer fra vrangen har også blitt brukt for å feste hullenes sårkanter til den overliggende lappen (f. eks. på lapp 6)."

              "Overcast stitches from the wrong side also has been used to fasten the edges of a hole to an overlaid patch (for example, patch no. 6)."

              The shirt was re-dated in the same thesis from 1050 to 1090 CE (pp. 147-152).

              ~Asfridhr
            • Quokkaqueen
              ... Thank-you, I had completely forgotten about Der Männerkittel aus Bernuthsfeld, and in hindsight it is obvious! ~Asfridhr
              Message 6 of 17 , Oct 23, 2010
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                <<snip>>
                > My favorite place to start for patching techniques -- although it's a bit on the early side (7th c) -- is the Bernuthsfeld tunic. Almost more patches than original fabric. The most detailed look at it is in an article by Heidemarie Farke in NESAT 6.
                >
                > Heather Rose Jones
                <<snip>>

                Thank-you, I had completely forgotten about "Der Männerkittel aus Bernuthsfeld," and in hindsight it is obvious!

                ~Asfridhr
              • Karen
                There s also the patches in a garment worn by the beggar in the story of St. Martin, on an altarpiece painted in 1496, now at the Landesmuseum Ferdinandeum in
                Message 7 of 17 , Oct 23, 2010
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                  There's also the patches in a garment worn by the beggar in the story of St.
                  Martin, on an altarpiece painted in 1496, now at the Landesmuseum Ferdinandeum
                  in Austria:
                  http://tarvos.imareal.oeaw.ac.at/server/images/7003321.JPG


                  Karen Larsdatter
                  www.larsdatter.com
                • Scott
                  Surely we have some experts on patching on this list. Heather Rose Jones or Robin of Netherton should be able to answer our questions, Are they on line? My
                  Message 8 of 17 , Oct 24, 2010
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                    Surely we have some experts on patching on this list. Heather Rose Jones or
                    Robin of Netherton should be able to answer our questions,

                    Are they on line? My favorite clothing article is a no go-Hewather Rose
                    Jones' presentation at Kalamazoo "Getting into women's underwear."

                    I had expected far more males to show interest: it got mo=inbe roight
                    away;p however,
                    I not only have know the author for decades but also am a charter member of
                    the SSS (Soiled Senior Citizens).

                    I have a plethora of white triskles on one garment that are looking worn and
                    grungy and my seamstress wife has the talent but not the back

                    stamina to even look at them; therefore, I shall be doing the stitches. My
                    last hand-stitched garment was a seersucker shirt in 1957.

                    It lasted me five years.



                    Colm Dubh
                  • LJonthebay
                    ... Please see message 58509: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Authentic_SCA/message/58509 Saionji no Hana West Kingdom
                    Message 9 of 17 , Oct 24, 2010
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                      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Scott" <Scat@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Surely we have some experts on patching on this list. Heather Rose Jones or
                      > Robin of Netherton should be able to answer our questions,
                      >
                      > Are they on line?

                      Please see message 58509:

                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Authentic_SCA/message/58509

                      Saionji no Hana
                      West Kingdom
                    • Heather Rose Jones
                      ... I would also like to note, I am not an expert on patching -- I m an expert at remembering the citations for odd bits of information I ve run across over
                      Message 10 of 17 , Oct 25, 2010
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                        On Oct 24, 2010, at 10:57 PM, LJonthebay wrote:

                        >
                        >
                        > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Scott" <Scat@...> wrote:
                        >>
                        >> Surely we have some experts on patching on this list. Heather Rose Jones or
                        >> Robin of Netherton should be able to answer our questions,
                        >>
                        >> Are they on line?
                        >
                        > Please see message 58509:
                        >
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Authentic_SCA/message/58509

                        I would also like to note, I am not an "expert on patching" -- I'm an expert at remembering the citations for odd bits of information I've run across over the years.

                        Tangwystyl
                      • Marianne Perdomo
                        Thanks to all for a very interesting conversation on a topic I hadn t thought of :) Cheers! Marianne [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        Message 11 of 17 , Oct 25, 2010
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                          Thanks to all for a very interesting conversation on a topic I hadn't
                          thought of :)

                          Cheers!

                          Marianne


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • George A. Trosper
                          ... Beggars are well known--very reasonably--for exaggerating and emphasizing their bodily deformities and lacks, so I wouldn t be surprised if the very
                          Message 12 of 17 , Oct 27, 2010
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                            On 10/23/2010 4:56 PM, Karen wrote:
                            > There's also the patches in a garment worn by the beggar in the story of St.
                            > Martin, on an altarpiece painted in 1496, now at the Landesmuseum Ferdinandeum
                            > in Austria:
                            > http://tarvos.imareal.oeaw.ac.at/server/images/7003321.JPG
                            >
                            >
                            > Karen Larsdatter
                            > www.larsdatter.com
                            Beggars are well known--very reasonably--for exaggerating and
                            emphasizing their bodily deformities and lacks, so I wouldn't be
                            surprised if the very obvious patching here were part of a similar pattern.

                            --George/Gerard
                          • xina007eu
                            Hi Asfridhr, the tunic of St Francis of Assisi that can be seen in the basilica at Assisi has been patched multiple times, and I think different stitches were
                            Message 13 of 17 , Oct 28, 2010
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                              Hi Asfridhr,

                              the tunic of St Francis of Assisi that can be seen in the basilica at Assisi has been patched multiple times, and I think different stitches were used. I remember reading that some of the pieces seem to have come from the tunic of St Clare, and that these patches are sewn on with a special stitch, but I can't find the reference at the moment.

                              With a multiple-layer garment (e.g. an Elizabethan doublet) you will only have to stitch the patch on the outside if the inner layers are intact. The doublet of Don Garzia de' Medici (a young man from one of the wealthiest families in Europe) has a patch on one elbow, which indicates that patching and repairing garments was not restricted to the lower classes.

                              Best regards,

                              Christina



                              --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Quokkaqueen" <quokkaqueen@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi All,
                              >
                              > It's reached that stage in my garb wardrobe, where I need to start repairing things, mostly patching holes and tears in seams. I *know* that there are garments out there with patches (the Y-piece on the Bocksten hood springs to mind), but what I'm having trouble is finding information on *how* garments were patched.
                              >
                              > I'm guessing that patches were sewn to the outside of the garment, but what happened on the inside? Were the edges of the repair hemmed facing inside the garment, or outside towards the patch? Were any special patching stitches used?
                              >
                              > Any help would be appreciated,
                              > ~Asfridhr
                              >
                            • Heather Rose Jones
                              ... You re probably thinking of the article on those garments in: Flury-Lemberg, Mechthild. 1988. Textile Conservation and Research. Schriften der
                              Message 14 of 17 , Oct 28, 2010
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                                On Oct 28, 2010, at 3:48 AM, xina007eu wrote:

                                > Hi Asfridhr,
                                >
                                > the tunic of St Francis of Assisi that can be seen in the basilica at Assisi has been patched multiple times, and I think different stitches were used. I remember reading that some of the pieces seem to have come from the tunic of St Clare, and that these patches are sewn on with a special stitch, but I can't find the reference at the moment

                                You're probably thinking of the article on those garments in:

                                Flury-Lemberg, Mechthild. 1988. Textile Conservation and Research. Schriften der Abegg-Stiftung, Bern.

                                Tangwystyl
                              • CLEY
                                Isn t there a story that Francis wished his robe to be made of patches, as a token of humility? Or am I confused with someone else? Arlys
                                Message 15 of 17 , Oct 28, 2010
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                                  Isn't there a story that Francis wished his robe to be made of patches,
                                  as a token of humility?

                                  Or am I confused with someone else?

                                  Arlys
                                • LJonthebay
                                  ... Buddhist priests wear a patchwork mantle called a kesa (Japanese), jiasha (Chinese) or kasaya (Sanskrit). Originally pieced from dirty rags, they
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Oct 28, 2010
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                                    --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, CLEY <cley56@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Isn't there a story that Francis wished his robe to be made of patches,
                                    > as a token of humility?
                                    >
                                    > Or am I confused with someone else?

                                    Buddhist priests wear a patchwork mantle called a kesa (Japanese), jiasha (Chinese) or kasaya (Sanskrit). Originally pieced from dirty rags, they eventually became far more opulent as donors gifted temples with silks belonging to deceased relatives. At least one description I've read seems to indicate that the act of constructing a kesa from many small pieces was considered a devotional exercise.

                                    Ironically, when I started looking for images to post, I discovered that the Kyoto National Museum currently has an exhibition on kesa:
                                    http://www.kyohaku.go.jp/eng/tokubetsu/101009/tokubetsu.html
                                    If you scroll down, the kesa shown at the bottom of the article is pieced from silk and gold brocade.

                                    (Pieced garments also became fashionable in 16th century Japan. A number of surviving robes from that period are either pieced or decorated to look as if they are pieced from alternating blocks of fabric. There's also at least one example that bears an uncanny resemblance to a "crazy quilt.")

                                    Saionji no Hana
                                    West Kingdom
                                  • Quokkaqueen
                                    My first response, upon reading ... I found a mention of an item patched on the inside-- one of the hoods from Viking Age Dublin. E. Wincott
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Nov 5, 2010
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                                      <<snip>>
                                      My first response, upon reading
                                      > Asfridhr's speculation was to say, "no, on the inside!" because that is the
                                      > most common method I learned for darning/patching frayed fabric.
                                      <<snip>>

                                      I found a mention of an item patched on the inside-- one of the hoods from Viking Age Dublin.
                                      E. Wincott Heckett. 2003. "Viking Age Headcoverings from Dublin" (Dublin: Royal Irish Academy")
                                      pp. 44, 46:
                                      "In wool cap DHC32 (Pl. VII, Fig. 52) a large patch has been sewn to the inside of the right-hand part. The sides of the patch have been turned under and it has been slip-stitched to the inside of the cap. If the patch had been put on to over a hole, placing it like this on the inside would leave the rough edges of the tear exposed to view on the outside, which is contrary to usual sewing practice. Placing the patch as it is means that the smooth surface would have been against the wearer's ear. This may suggest that the patch was put on to provide extra protection and warmth, or to strengthen a threadbare rather than a torn area. It may also be that it was unimportant that ragged edges were left on the outside. This would be true if the cap was worn under another headcovering or indeed as a nightcap."

                                      There are other patches in there, too, but I thought this particular one on the inside might be interesting as a possible exception to the rule. :)

                                      ~Asfridhr
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