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Re: [Authentic_SCA] OT: taking care of "archaelogical" stuff

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  • Jeff Gedney
    first, make a record of where on your property you found them, and at what depth, if you can. include what you were doing when you found them. if possible,
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 30, 2010
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      first,
      make a record of where on your property you found them, and at what depth,
      if you can.
      include what you were doing when you found them.
      if possible, take pics of the objects in situ or at least the location of
      the find.
      second, some question: do you want to preserve these items or restore then?
      do you want to be able to handle them or purely preserve them like a museum
      might?




      --------------------------------------------------
      From: "Marianne Perdomo" <marianne@...>
      Sent: Thursday, September 30, 2010 4:58 AM
      To: "authentic_sca" <Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: [Authentic_SCA] OT: taking care of "archaelogical" stuff

      > Hello!
      >
      > In a country house we're rehabilitating, I've found some stuff buried...
      > It's not very old (likely to be early 20th century, late 19th century at
      > most) but it means a lot to me as it's part of the history of the house,
      > plus I like ethnographical stuff. However, I'm at a loss as to how to best
      > preserve it. Any clues?
      >
      > It's an old iron key, a baby-sized leather sandal and part of an adult's
      > shoe.
      >
      > Cheers!
      >
      >
      > Marianne
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > ----------------------------------------------------
      > This is the Authentic SCA eGroupYahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Marianne Perdomo
      Hello! 2010/9/30 Jeff Gedney ... Alas, I was moving soil that had already been moved by the construction workers, so that the location
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 30, 2010
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        Hello!

        2010/9/30 Jeff Gedney <gedney@...>

        >
        > first,
        > make a record of where on your property you found them, and at what depth,
        > if you can.
        > include what you were doing when you found them.
        >

        Alas, I was moving soil that had already been moved by the construction
        workers, so that the location is no longer indicative of where it was
        originally dumped . :( It's all a mix of soil with bits of old tiles, bits
        of new tile, bits of glass and pottery,... I suspect it came from an area
        behind the old kitchen (in the Canary islands traditionally kitchens were
        outbuildings).
        When possible I have noted where other things came from. I found, for
        example, the base of the pillar for the porch - I photographed it before
        moving it, kept it in a safe place and it's now doing its job again :)


        > second, some question: do you want to preserve these items or restore then?
        > do you want to be able to handle them or purely preserve them like a museum
        > might?
        >

        Preserve them like a museum might would be ideal (within my capability, of
        course, which excludes climate control, I'd say). Being able to handle them
        carefully would be a plus, but it isn't necessary. I just don't want them to
        fall apart. And they can look less a lump of stuff with soil, that's also
        good.

        Thank you!!!


        Marianne


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Marianne Perdomo
        To give you a better idea of the condition of the items I ve taken some photos. http://picasaweb.google.com/marianne.perdomo/Arqueologia_siberica For starters
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 30, 2010
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          To give you a better idea of the condition of the items I've taken some
          photos.

          http://picasaweb.google.com/marianne.perdomo/Arqueologia_siberica

          For starters I wonder whether removing soil would best be done with a brush,
          dry, or what...

          They key still feels heavy, for example, but I worry that cleaning the rust
          will remove most of "it", too. :/

          Cheers!


          Marianne


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • gedney@OPTONLINE.NET
          Here s what I would do: For the key, I would soak it for a week in a good oil, and gently brush the dirt off it with a soft toothbrush (placing it on a
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 30, 2010
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            Here's what I would do:

            For the key, I would soak it for a week in a good oil, and gently brush the dirt off it with a "soft" toothbrush (placing it on a supportive surface, not holding it in your hands).

            For the sandal and other artifact, carefully work off as much dirt as you can using a dry natural bristle paint brush (again, placing it on a supportive surface, not holding it in your hands).
            Then place the items in a shallow pan of neatsfoot oil, and rub gently with a soft cloth soaked in the oil to remove the dirt.
            Allow the neatsfoot oil to soak in well for a few days and then drain on brown paper, changing the paper regularly.
            When the paper stops getting oily move the items to a sealable box lined with acid free paper.
            You can get frame boxes with glass tops at a craft store, that will allow you to store these items and be able to view them witheout disturbing their environment.

            For any of the items don't be obsessive about removing ALL the dirt.
            A little dirt is OK

            Pay attention to the leather items on a regular basis, and check for signs of molding.
            If there is mold that develops, gently rub it off with a soft cloth soaked in neatsfoot oil.

            Label each find carefully with where, when and how you found it.

            If the key seemed to be really just rust, there are preservative resins you should use instead of oil.
            Same with the leather items.
            If the leather seems really fragile, like it is coming apart in a sort of powdery fashion as you are cleaning it while dry, then stop.
            dont do anything.
            You can probably take it to a local museum for advice.
            They can either recommend products you can use to conserve it, or they might well conserve it for you for a small fee or the right to exhibit it for a time.

            Since these items dont seem that old (from your first mail) I think it is probably not that far gone and the oil cleaning will be OK.
            but be alert to the condition of the item as you go.



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Marianne Perdomo
            Hello! Seems like very sensible advice, all :) Thanks! The only doubt is whether I ll be able to get neatsfoot oil here (I never heard the term until I got on
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 30, 2010
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              Hello!

              Seems like very sensible advice, all :) Thanks!

              The only doubt is whether I'll be able to get neatsfoot oil here (I never
              heard the term until I got on leatherwork English-language mailing lists). A
              friend has suggested olive oil...

              For the key... do you mean a good mineral oil, or the same kind of thing?

              Cheers!


              Marianne


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • gedney@OPTONLINE.NET
              Mineral oil is an excellent choice for the key. It neutral and is available widely. I would not go with Olive oil, or nut oils. They are complex have several
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 30, 2010
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                Mineral oil is an excellent choice for the key.
                It neutral and is available widely.
                I would not go with Olive oil, or nut oils.
                They are complex have several vegetative components, and can go rancid.
                You want an oil that will evaporate completely or oxidize to varnish, rather than turn to a gummy goo or go rancid.

                3in1oil is a good choice but it will evaporate rapidly requireing frequent reapplications.

                You should be able to get neatsfoot oil on line.
                http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-31028&TID=nextag5&EID=X1845001&catalog_code=1X845&zmam=1460880&zmas=1&zmac=36&zmap=X1-31028
                http://www.tandyleatherfactory.com/search/searchresults/21998-00.aspx?feature=Product_3&kw=neatsfoot
                are two places

                you can also use boiled linseed oil for the leather, though I dont like it as much.

                Brush clean the leather items and pack them away in a dry place wrapped in acid free paper until it arrives.
                Dont seal the container to prevent the accumulation of condensation.



                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Marianne Perdomo
                Date: Thursday, September 30, 2010 1:58 pm
                Subject: Re: [Authentic_SCA] OT: taking care of "archaelogical" stuff
                To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com

                > Hello!
                >
                > Seems like very sensible advice, all :) Thanks!
                >
                > The only doubt is whether I'll be able to get neatsfoot oil here
                > (I never
                > heard the term until I got on leatherwork English-language
                > mailing lists). A
                > friend has suggested olive oil...
                >
                > For the key... do you mean a good mineral oil, or the same kind
                > of thing?
                >
                > Cheers!
                >
                >
                > Marianne
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > ----------------------------------------------------
                > This is the Authentic SCA eGroupYahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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