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fashion history/costuming books

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  • Kate
    Hello All, Due to an extremely successful book sale, we (the librarians) have been given the priveledge to choose 5 books to be purchased for our library
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 27, 2010
      Hello All,
      Due to an extremely successful book sale, we (the librarians) have been given the priveledge to choose 5 books to be purchased for our library system in an area of our interest. This is a rare thing, as usually books must be chosen within our dept (mine is the Children'd Dept.) I want to update our fashion history/costuming books. If there was one "drop-dead, can't do without" book in this genre, what would it be? Please let me know your top one of two picks, as I want my books to help Scadians/reenactors in our community.
      Thanks,
      Kate W./Inga of Lyndhaven
    • Folo Watkins
      ... Speaking from the perspective of an Early Middle Ages reenactor: Ewing, Þor. Viking Clothing. Owen-Crocker, Gail. Dress in Anglo-Saxon England, Second
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 27, 2010
        >Due to an extremely successful book sale, we
        >(the librarians) have been given the priveledge
        >to choose 5 books to be purchased for our
        >library system in an area of our interest. This
        >is a rare thing, as usually books must be chosen
        >within our dept (mine is the Children'd Dept.) I
        >want to update our fashion history/costuming
        >books. If there was one "drop-dead, can't do
        >without" book in this genre, what would it be?
        >Please let me know your top one of two picks, as
        >I want my books to help Scadians/reenactors in our community.

        Speaking from the perspective of an Early Middle Ages reenactor:
        Ewing, Þor. Viking Clothing.
        Owen-Crocker, Gail. Dress in Anglo-Saxon England, Second Edition.

        These are both several years old, so you may
        already have them in your system, but I've found
        them so good that I have two copies so I can lend
        out one to members of my group!

        Cheers, Folo
        www.micelfolcland.org
      • Dianne
        If there was one drop-dead, can t do without book in this genre, what would it be? Please let me know your top one of two picks, as I want my books to help
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 28, 2010
          If there was one "drop-dead, can't do without" book in this genre, what would it be? Please let me know your top one of two picks, as I want my books to help Scadians/reenactors in our community.


          1. Anything by Janet Arnold

          2. The Tudor Tailor


          Laurensa

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Trish
          ... would it be? Please let me know your top one of two picks, as I want my books to help Scadians/reenactors in our community. ... I second that. ~Trish
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 28, 2010
            >If there was one "drop-dead, can't do without" book in this genre, what
            would it be? Please let me know your top one of two picks, >as I want my
            books to help Scadians/reenactors in our community.
            >1. Anything by Janet Arnold
            >2. The Tudor Tailor
            >Laurensa

            I second that.

            ~Trish
            http://www.trishstuff.com




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Kim Mitchell
            I can very highly recommend The Medieval Tailor s Assistant, by Sarah Thursfield. Ms. Thursfield is a highly respected researcher in her field, with the
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 28, 2010
              I can very highly recommend "The Medieval Tailor's Assistant, by Sarah Thursfield. Ms. Thursfield is a highly respected researcher in her field, with the added bonus that she is a dedicated historical interpreter as well. She recognizes how things were done, and is also able to present her material in a manner that is easy to understand by the 21st century tailor, or sempstress. Her techniques are not narrow in scope, and many can be documented through to the later years of the SCA period as well. http://www.amazon.com/Medieval-Tailors-Assistant-Garments-1200-1500/dp/0896762394.

              Caroline Johnson's new book, "The King's Servants", also comes highly recommended. Edited by Ninya Mikhaila and Jane Malcolm-Davies, it is a treasure trove for those wishing to sew clothes worn in the style of Henrician menfolk who were not gentry or upper class. http://www.amazon.com/Kings-Servants-Dress-Accession-Henry/dp/0956267408/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267400914&sr=1-3

              A tough choice to make, but one that I am sure many of us wish had!

              Lady Jane Devereux
              Shire of Glaedenfeld
              Kingdom of Meridies
            • megatrope
              MODERATOR NOTE: As a courtesy to those members who receive their list mail in digest form, we request that you do not top post. Please trim portions of
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 1, 2010
                MODERATOR NOTE: As a courtesy to those members who receive their list mail in digest form, we request that you do not top post. Please trim portions of previous posts that do not require repetition. Thank you.
                Jehanne de Wodeford, Pacific Time Zone Moderator.
                (REPEATED MESSAGES DELETED)

                I concur with "The Medieval Tailor's Assistant" and add that many of the extant pieces she references are further discussed in the Museum of London's "Textiles and Clothing", which is also a wonderful resource.

                I also can't live without "Fashion in the Age of the Black Prince" by Stella Newton.

                Cecilia
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