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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Splits in Skirts

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  • Antonia di Benedetto Calvo
    ... AFAIK, there is no evidence for contrasting-coloured gussets in period (although you do see it occasionally in SCA-wear). -- Antonia di Benedetto Calvo ...
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 10, 2010
      curious_workmanship wrote:
      > I've still got a lot to learn when it comes to authenticity, but it occurred to me that perhaps what looks like a split in a skirt exposing an underskirt might actually be a gusset of a contrasting fabric? I know that adding a gusset is the basic way to increase fullness at the hip in a tunic-type garment, and that particoloring was cool and that fabric was expensive, so perhaps this would be a more period way to achieve that split-skirt look? Now I'm curious about it.
      >

      AFAIK, there is no evidence for contrasting-coloured gussets in period
      (although you do see it occasionally in SCA-wear).


      --
      Antonia di Benedetto Calvo

      -----------------------------
      Habeo metrum - musicamque,
      hominem meam. Expectat alium quid?
      -Georgeus Gershwinus
      -----------------------------
    • Quokkaqueen
      ... Depending on how dodgy your skills are at dyeing fabric, you may accidentally wind up with gores a different shade than the tunic body.
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 11, 2010
        <<snip>>
        > AFAIK, there is no evidence for contrasting-coloured gussets in period
        > (although you do see it occasionally in SCA-wear).
        <<snip>>

        Depending on how dodgy your skills are at dyeing fabric, you may accidentally wind up with gores a different shade than the tunic body.
        (Or, how well the dyes were preserved over time, which is what I suspect is what gives the yellow-green Guddal tunic more yellowish sleeves and a gore -- about halfway down here -- http://home.broadpark.no/~jantaule/div%20om%20middelalderen/diverse_om_middelalderen.htm )

        For a clearer example of uneven dyeing giving slightly different shades of colour, see a modern reconstruction of a tunic here:
        http://www.vesteraalen.info/gavlen_skjoldehamndrakten_2_09.JPG
        from http://www.vesteraalen.info/reportasje_andoy_skjoldeforedrag_09.htm


        But that's different to having _contrasting_ gores. The only examples I can think of are within the SCA period (pre-1600), but aren't European (they're 16th century Korean).

        ~Asfridhr
        (Who has one dress in particular that is fading very unevenly, and is now a weird combination of lavender and blue-grey.)
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