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On the bottom of chausses...

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  • JL Badgley
    So I m noticing a lot of paintings of people where it seems they have no shoes on, just chausses (or hose), even though they are clearly out in the field.
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 8, 2009
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      So I'm noticing a lot of paintings of people where it seems they have
      no shoes on, just chausses (or hose), even though they are clearly out
      in the field. This leaves me to wonder:

      a) Did the feet of said garments wear through quickly?
      b) Did they put some sort of sole on them?
      c) Am I seeing something drawn, not done.
      d) Are there "invisible" shoes--that is, shoes of the same color that
      the chausses/hose are made out of?
      e) Something else?

      Anyone have theories? I'm noticing this particularly in pictures of
      the Crusades.


      -EGL
    • christopher chastain
      MODERATOR NOTE: As a courtesy to the many members who receive their list mail in digest form, we request that you not top-post (stick your response to the top
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 8, 2009
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        MODERATOR NOTE: As a courtesy to the many members who receive their list mail in digest form, we request that you not top-post (stick your response to the top of one or more messages that came before it). Thank you. Jehanne de Wodeford, Pacific Timezone Moderator.
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        To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
        From: tatsushu@...
        Date: Tue, 8 Sep 2009 23:09:27 +0700
        Subject: [Authentic_SCA] On the bottom of chausses...

        So I'm noticing a lot of paintings of people where it seems they have
        no shoes on, just chausses (or hose), even though they are clearly out
        in the field.

        [snipped]
        Anyone have theories? I'm noticing this particularly in pictures of
        the Crusades.

        Budget cuts?

        Yours in Humble Service,
        Pomestnik Dmitrii Zarekoi Ivanov
        �To be a warrior is not a simple matter of wishing to be one. It is rather an endless struggle that will go on to the very last moment of our lives. Nobody is born a warrior, in exactly the same way that nobody is born an average man. We make ourselves into one or the other.�






        To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
        From: tatsushu@...
        Date: Tue, 8 Sep 2009 23:09:27 +0700
        Subject: [Authentic_SCA] On the bottom of chausses...





        So I'm noticing a lot of paintings of people where it seems they have
        no shoes on, just chausses (or hose), even though they are clearly out
        in the field. This leaves me to wonder:

        a) Did the feet of said garments wear through quickly?
        b) Did they put some sort of sole on them?
        c) Am I seeing something drawn, not done.
        d) Are there "invisible" shoes--that is, shoes of the same color that
        the chausses/hose are made out of?
        e) Something else?

        Anyone have theories? I'm noticing this particularly in pictures of
        the Crusades.

        -EGL








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      • quokkaqueen
        ... Page 115 of Shoes and Patterns from the Museum of London series, says: Hose fitted with soles seem to have been worn from the middle
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 8, 2009
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          <<snip>>
          > b) Did they put some sort of sole on them?
          <<snip>>

          Page 115 of "Shoes and Patterns" from the Museum of London series, says:

          "Hose fitted with soles seem to have been worn from the middle of the 12th century, if not earlier.... Manuscripts show the majority of wearers of short tunics in long footed hose of stout woollen material or leather -- King John had a pair of cow hide... -- not joined at the top but held up by strings attached to the belt...."

          But that is a reference to the upper-class, not working peasants. However, putting soles on your hose would make them last longer than a fabric bottom, _and_ if you're walking in a relatively stone-less field and you have fairly thick feet-soles already, then maybe it was more comfortable and cost-effective to wear fabric hose with leather shoes that could be patched, then wear your one decent pair of leather shoes for when you're walking somewhere with more gravel or stones or paving?

          Just a guess though, since from experience even relatively thin leather turnshoes make walking on gravel much more tolerable, but would also wear the soles out quicker.

          ~Asfridhr
        • Tiffany Brown
          ... I have a pair of poor quality linen hose, and worn with a a thin pair of turnshoes with a large hole in the heel, I ve worn a hole in these hose twice in
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 8, 2009
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            2009/9/9 JL Badgley <tatsushu@...>:
            > a) Did the feet of said garments wear through quickly?

            I have a pair of poor quality linen hose, and worn with a a thin pair
            of turnshoes with a large hole in the heel, I've worn a hole in these
            hose twice in just one evening of a few dances on hard packed ground.
            I know next time I'll use sturdier fabric, as i'm sure medieval people
            soon learned, but I do think fabric would wear through fairly quickly.

            > b) Did they put some sort of sole on them?

            Yes. That leather soles were added to cloth hose seems to be one of
            these statements that is very widely stated (especially for 12th C,
            especially for knights a horseback), but I haven't tracked down a
            really solid source for yet. Probably because my main focus is
            archeological remains, and if the fabric has rotted away, it just
            looks like a shoe sole, so I need to look at literary sources.

            > c) Am I seeing something drawn, not done.
            > d) Are there "invisible" shoes--that is, shoes of the same color that
            > the chausses/hose are made out of?

            Look for the lead outline under the drawing, when you can get high
            resolution pictures. Sometimes you'll see a fine horizontal line
            above the ankle whihc has not been reproduced in the ink and
            colouring - ie the artist who is colouring in may not have been hte
            same as hte one who did the original sketching, and may have
            misinterpreted.

            I don't think actual same coloured shoes are likely to be common, but
            artist mistakes/ misinterpretatins/hurried shortcuts etc are.

            > e) Something else?

            Also check carefully for footless hose - these seem to have existed,
            so are a possible thing you coulds see. Some look like stirrup pants.

            Hose could be worn with pattens (or clogs) without a shoe, both
            pattens and clogs are around in this time frame and I get the feeling
            the 15th C fashion for pattens without shoes didn't come out of
            nothing. Woven straw sandals or low leather "bog shoes" are also an
            option, but not one I've found evidence for yet.

            From my recollections, most pictures of peasants in the fields had
            bare legs, so be cautious where you have black and white or outline
            drawings, rather than rather obvious green legs etc.

            Some example pictures might help confirm your interpretation as well
            as illuminate us?

            Teffania
            --
            . ___
            {o,o} The blog you are not looking for
            |)__) is definitely not at
            -"-"- http://teffania.blogspot.com
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