Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Greetings, introduction and request

Expand Messages
  • neeveofredriver
    Salutation Lords and Ladies. I am happy to have stumbled upon this group. I hope I will be as useful to this group as I presume it will be to me. My name
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 16, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Salutation Lords and Ladies. I am happy to have stumbled upon this group. I hope I will be as useful to this group as I presume it will be to me.

      My name (pending heraldic approval) is Nem of AnAbhainn Rua. My persona of choice is that of a Lady holding lands in County Meath, Ireland in the middle 11th century. I chose this area for its proximity to the famous landmark Newgrange as well as the city of Dublin with its Viking invaders and trade routes. I chose the period just after the famous campaign and death of the legendary Brian Boru.

      My theory was that I would find ample sources for the details of daily life, but, I find myself in academic doldrums. I would be grateful for helpful links and other resources, especially those with germain images.

      Yours in Service and Gratitude,
      Nem of AnAbhainn Rua
      [Caryn Thomas]
    • NickD611@aol.com
      Greetings from another inhabitant of early-period Ireland.  I don t think I ve posted here before, so introductions are in order. In the SCA I am Dubdarach
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 16, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Greetings from another inhabitant of early-period Ireland.  I don't think I've posted here before, so introductions are in order.

        In the SCA I am Dubdarach macLongaidh, Aire Déso chieftain of Ráth Druim Dearg (Red Ridge Fort), on the southern coast of Munster.  Not as impressive as it sounds, by the way;  Aire Déso is the lowest rank of "full" Irish nobility, I only have about a half-dozen free clients, and they never seem to pay their taxes... Insolent imaginary commoners!

        The first thing I'll say about early-period Ireland is, it's not for those who are afraid of putting together puzzles.  Early Ireland is probably among the least-well excavated places in western Europe.  That said, there is information out there, you're just not going to find piles of it like you would for, say, Anglo-Saxon England.

        A gem of information on what has been dug up from early Ireland, is Lloyd Laing's "Archeaology of Late Celtic Britain and Ireland, C.400-1200 A.D." (ISBN: 0416659705).  I have the 1975 edition, but there's an updated version out there that incorporates more recent archeaological finds and theories.  Most of the pictures are black-and-white photos or line drawings, but I found if I type the name of a particular artifact into my search engine, I can usually find good color photos online.

        For social and political structures and daily life, I'd recommend Nerys Patterson's "Cattle Lords and Clansmen, The Social Structure of Early Ireland" (ISBN: 0268008000).  It makes t
        he notoriously complex Irish legal system (which governed almost all aspects of daily life, including the material possessions of the various grades of commoner and noble) understandable for those of us without Ph.Ds.

        For clothing I know of two good sources.  First is H.F. McClintock's "Old Irish and Highland Dress, with Notes on That of the Isle of Man"  It's hard to find decently priced copies of this book, since it's been out of print for years, but scotpress.com has a digital version (this link takes you right to the page: http://scotpress.com/catalog/books-about-scotland-tartan-textiles-clothing-c-25_34/old-irish-and-highland-dress-p-93) for $20.00 that you can buy as either a pdf download or on cd.

        The second book on clothing I'd recommend is Mairead Dunlevy's "Dress in Ireland" (ISBN: 1898256845)  Early medieval Ireland is only a small part of this book, but the information it does have is good.

        It's also convienient that you've placed yourself near the trading center of Dublin.  If you can't find what the Irish had for a particular item, you can look to nearby cultures like the Norse or Ango-Saxons.  The nobility would have enjoyed impressing the commoners, and eachother, with exotic foreign imports.  Of course I'd say use that strategy in moderation, since imports would still be in the minority among the average noble's material goods.

        Those are the main sources my mentors have given me, and they've helped greatly to clarify my image of early medieval Ireland.  Hopefully they'll serve you=2
        0just as well.

        Sláinte,
        Dubdarach macLongaidh

























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • julian wilson
        My Lady, - if you are seeking information concerning histoiric Ireland, why not contact Baron and Master Etienne Fevre - one of the founding forces behind the
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 16, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          My Lady, -
          if you are seeking information concerning histoiric Ireland, why not contact Baron and Master Etienne Fevre - one of the founding forces behind the SCA Shires in Ireland?
          Here's his e-mail address
          John Prendergast <etiennesca@...>
          If he is unable to answer your questions personally,
           he will certainly be able to direct you to other sources.
          YiS,
           Lord Matthew Baker

          --- On Tue, 16/6/09, neeveofredriver <neeveofredriver@...> wrote:

          From: neeveofredriver <neeveofredriver@...>
          Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Greetings, introduction and request
          To: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, 16 June, 2009, 7:24 PM

          Salutation Lords and Ladies.  I am happy to have stumbled upon this group..  I hope I will be as useful to this group as I presume it will be to me..

          My name (pending heraldic approval) is Nem of AnAbhainn Rua.  My persona of choice is that of a Lady holding lands in County Meath, Ireland in the middle 11th century.  I chose this area for its proximity to the famous landmark Newgrange as well as the city of Dublin with its Viking invaders and trade routes.  I chose the period just after the famous campaign and death of the legendary Brian Boru. 

          My theory was that I would find ample sources for the details of daily life, but, I find myself in academic doldrums.  I would be grateful for helpful links and other resources, especially those with germain images. 

          Yours in Service and Gratitude,
          Nem of AnAbhainn Rua
          [Caryn Thomas]



          ------------------------------------

          ----------------------------------------------------
          This is the Authentic SCA eGroupYahoo! Groups Links





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Beth and Bob Matney
          ... Well actually, the problem is not so much the excavations, but funding for the reports... In addition to bits and pieces from archaeology reports and a few
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 16, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            At 04:22 PM 6/16/2009, Dubdarach macLongaidh wrote:
            >Greetings from another inhabitant of
            >early-period Ireland. I don't think I've
            >posted here before, so introductions are in order.
            >
            ><snip>
            >
            >The first thing I'll say about early-period
            >Ireland is, it's not for those who are afraid of
            >putting together puzzles. Early Ireland is
            >probably among the least-well excavated places
            >in western Europe. That said, there is
            >information out there, you're just not going to
            >find piles of it like you would for, say, Anglo-Saxon England.
            ><snip>

            Well actually, the problem is not so much the
            excavations, but funding for the reports...

            In addition to bits and pieces from archaeology
            reports and a few primary sources, I would also
            mention several other resources:

            Wincott Heckett, Elizabeth. Viking Age
            Headcoverings from Dublin. Dublin: Royal Irish
            Academy, 2003. ISBN: 0954385551 9780954385552 OCLC: 55214944

            The PhD dissertation:
            Fitzgerald, Maria Amelia. Textile production in
            prehistoric and early medieval Ireland.
            (Manchester Metropolitan University, 2000.) DXN039210 BLDSC ethos 326250
            is finally available for free download. The EThOS
            homepage is http://ethos.bl.uk/Home.do
            It could of used a more thorough proofreading,
            but is worth the read. It is also particularly
            useful for it's discussion of law resources for costume.

            Fitzgerald also did a MA thesis on Irish costume,
            but I have been unable to acquire it as yet.

            Regards,
            Beth Matney
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.