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RE: [Authentic_SCA] On Feasting (was: on white and sweet potatoes)

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  • Jeff gedney
    ... But that presumes that the court and populace is entirely and only English. But only a minority of the populace is English, so I don t feel as much of a
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 5, 2009
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      > But this is a problem with any kind of presentation. E.g. How often
      > would English courts have had Middle Eastern cuisine? Heck, I wonder
      > how often English courts would have served German foods, or French, or
      > Italian.

      But that presumes that the court and populace is entirely and only English.
      But only a minority of the populace is English, so I don't feel as much of a
      disconnect when I, as an English persona, sit down to a German feast... I
      feel that I am just visiting Germany.
      Even a polyglot feast of period dishes from several places makes sense since
      our events have such a polyglot attendance.
      I generally don't find offense with any "ordinary" or even "festival"
      cuisine that hares to a period cuisine from a European or "European contact"
      culture.
      After all, according to Corpora, the event is supposed to recreate the
      milieu of a Medieval/Renaissance feast or festival day.

      But I just don't see how you can suppose that serving big dishes of New
      World foods, which would have been a remarkable rarity and only in the very
      latter part of period --just because a few reports of it winkles under the
      1601 (again, Corpora) cutoff-- creates that milieu.

      Capt Elias
    • Marianne Perdomo
      2009/1/6 Jeff gedney ... I was just about to say that... Anyway... my opinion is that European regional cuisine didn t vary that much. I
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 6, 2009
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        2009/1/6 Jeff gedney <gedney@...>

        > But that presumes that the court and populace is entirely and only English.


        I was just about to say that...

        Anyway... my opinion is that European regional cuisine didn't vary that
        much. I have seen very similar recipes in Nola, Le Menagier and Early
        Northern Cookbook. While it's difficult to have everyone have their bit in
        such a multi-period, multi-national recreation, I think there's a "core"
        that should form the basis of menus, and then occasionally you can have fun
        with something odd. The recipes mentioned in the herbal for potato/sweet
        potato sounded more like a medieval dish than normal boiled or fried
        potatoes people are used to having. So if my persona had to try them, she'd
        just probably assume it's some other kind of root vegetable - no big deal!
        I think the problem is the one mentioned before - when it's clearly modern.
        I'd avoid the roasted potatoes mentioned in the herball for that very
        reason, except perhaps at a very special occassion.

        Obviously my personal opinion ;)

        Leonor / Marianne


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      • Labhaoise O'Beachain
        This reminds me of my time in HI. We attended a tourist luau, where they served traditional foods in little pleated paper cups, usually used for relish....
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 6, 2009
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          This reminds me of my time in HI. We attended a tourist luau, where
          they served traditional foods in little pleated paper cups, usually
          used for relish.... plenty of hot dogs and the like were available.

          Then, through connections we attended a traditional luau... an entire
          day, with traditional entertainments provide by.... yes, each other,
          in the morning the hole was dug, the fire build, and the foods layered
          in....... That night, glistening young men danced the whole pig
          through the feast of all to oooh and aah over. Great steaming bowls of
          food were placed in circles of waiting diners, much that was served
          was unfamiliar to unrecognizable, although it was mostly readily
          available in the markets... as we drove home, my husband leaned over
          and asked....

          "what did they do with the pig?"

          Labhaoise
        • Hawkyns
          I m crossposting this to a couple of lists, my apologies if yiu receive it more than once. Does anyone have any evidence or documentation of the reflector oven
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 6, 2009
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            I'm crossposting this to a couple of lists, my apologies if yiu receive it more than once.

            Does anyone have any evidence or documentation of the reflector oven being used in period?  The earliest I have been able to date it is to a Flemish painting of about 1660.
             
            Thank you.
             
            Hawkyns,
            East


              

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