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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Years covered by SCA

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  • Cynthia J Ley
    Begging your pardom, Gregory, but corn in Britishese actually means any kind of grain, not just wheat. It can also mean barley or oats. Arlys ...
    Message 1 of 80 , Dec 30, 2008
      Begging your pardom, Gregory, but "corn" in Britishese actually means any
      kind of grain, not just wheat. It can also mean barley or oats.

      Arlys

      On Tue, 30 Dec 2008 14:04:05 -0800 Greg Lindahl <lindahl@...> writes:
      > On Tue, Dec 30, 2008 at 09:56:56PM +0000, Marianne Perdomo wrote:
      >
      > > The same thing happens with "corn" from time to time. You will see
      > > references to medieval corn which is actually wheat, not maize.
      >
      > I guess you live in the US? Outside the US, you still see references
      > to corn, meaning wheat. I see it all the time in the Economist,
      > which
      > is a magazine mostly written by British correspondents.
      >
      > -- Gregory
      >
      >

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    • Katherine Throckmorton
      I ve been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at feasts. It isn t the fact that they aren t period. Its more the fact that it seems
      Message 80 of 80 , Jan 5, 2009
        I've been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at
        feasts. It isn't the fact that they aren't period. Its more the fact that
        it seems that when things like potatoes, tomatoes, chocolate and turkey were
        served, they would have been a novelty. These foods would have been new and
        exotic and serving them at a feast would have made a statement. Serving
        them as a ordinary part of a feast, with no effort to get people to think
        about how 16th century people would have seen these foods has the effect of
        pulling us into the modern world, where a dish of mashed potatoes is
        commonplace.

        -Katherine


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