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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Years covered by SCA

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  • Marianne Perdomo
    ... Or peacock. The word for both in Spanish (in which it appears in some recipes), pavo , is the same for turkey and peacock/peahen. Modernly this
    Message 1 of 80 , Dec 30, 2008
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      >
      > As far as the turkey is concerned, you can always pretend it's a
      > goose :-)
      >

      Or peacock. The word for both in Spanish (in which it appears in some
      recipes), 'pavo', is the same for turkey and peacock/peahen. Modernly this
      distinction is made by calling the peacock "royal" (pavo real) as opposed to
      plain "pavo" which is turkey.

      I guess they looked similar enough that the same word was "inherited", much
      like it happened with the word "pumpkin", as Christina wrote. Amusing, huh?
      :) Of course, actual turkey could have been served in the 16th c. - just
      that it wasn't a normal thing, as far as I'm aware.

      But I personally find it silly for people to criticize late-periodness when
      it's both clearly part of the game and, even worse, there's much, much worse
      out there... like all those 20-21st century things that look medieval to
      some, but just aren't like anything actually used in medieval times.

      Incidentally I do 1470s, but I'm seriously toying with the idea of doing
      1590s French or Venetian to go with some dances we're doing lately. If
      anyone does go that late, I'd love to now you're out there. :)

      Cheers!


      Leonor / Marianne


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    • Katherine Throckmorton
      I ve been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at feasts. It isn t the fact that they aren t period. Its more the fact that it seems
      Message 80 of 80 , Jan 5, 2009
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        I've been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at
        feasts. It isn't the fact that they aren't period. Its more the fact that
        it seems that when things like potatoes, tomatoes, chocolate and turkey were
        served, they would have been a novelty. These foods would have been new and
        exotic and serving them at a feast would have made a statement. Serving
        them as a ordinary part of a feast, with no effort to get people to think
        about how 16th century people would have seen these foods has the effect of
        pulling us into the modern world, where a dish of mashed potatoes is
        commonplace.

        -Katherine


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