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Re: Years covered by SCA

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  • xina007eu
    ... Ham, while I m a veg. (called pythagoraeans at the time and though unfashionable) and won t eat it, is period and should be welcomed as such. Any attempt
    Message 1 of 80 , Dec 30, 2008
      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "asackville@..."
      <asackville@...> wrote:
      >
      > My Late Period friend, so am I. I am Late Period 1570's England.
      Ham, while I'm a veg. (called pythagoraeans at the time and though
      unfashionable) and won't eat it, is period and should be welcomed as
      such. Any attempt to surpress it is intollerance and the concept of
      early period cutoff at about 1600 should be brought up if such
      inattention to documentation should be bandied. Take note that I
      could care less about a start date but that intollerance about thngs
      that would have been recognised after 1500 being intollerably late is
      inexcusable. I am an Elizabethan and if I want to have pumpkin and
      turkey for my Christmas feast than it is NOT out of period. PROVE TO
      ME IT ISN'T. Pumpkins and turkeys came over from the New World in the
      early part of the 16th Century. Henry VIII ate pumpkin pie. It's
      documented. Tell me it's not and back it up with better than
      Wikipedia. Challenge set. Your game.
      >
      > Fionnuala
      >
      >
      > ____________________________________________________________
      > Want more money in your pocket? Click to consolidate student loans.
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      >

      Hi Fionnuala,

      there were pumpkins in the Old World, even though the ones we have
      now are derived from New World varieties. The ancient Romans and
      Greeks ate punmpkins. Apicius includes recipes for cooking pumpkins.
      Seneca the Younger even wrote a poem about the Emperor Claudius being
      transformed into a pumpkin.

      I think modern strawberries are also descended from Southern American
      varieties, but of course they had strawberries in period, they had
      the small wild ones native to Europe.
      And we also have to eat orange carrots even though carrots in period
      were not orange, but usually whitish or yellowish (the orange
      varieties date back to the 17th century IIRC), and most of the other
      kinds of fruit and vegetables we eat are not like their period
      counterparts.
      However, we have to take the varieties we can get nowadays.

      Brussels sprouts, on the other hand, are definitely not period, they
      were only created in the early 19th century, which should be a relief
      for those of us who hate Brussels sprouts.

      As far as the turkey is concerned, you can always pretend it's a
      goose :-)

      I hope you had a great Christmas!

      Best regards,

      Christina
    • Katherine Throckmorton
      I ve been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at feasts. It isn t the fact that they aren t period. Its more the fact that it seems
      Message 80 of 80 , Jan 5, 2009
        I've been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at
        feasts. It isn't the fact that they aren't period. Its more the fact that
        it seems that when things like potatoes, tomatoes, chocolate and turkey were
        served, they would have been a novelty. These foods would have been new and
        exotic and serving them at a feast would have made a statement. Serving
        them as a ordinary part of a feast, with no effort to get people to think
        about how 16th century people would have seen these foods has the effect of
        pulling us into the modern world, where a dish of mashed potatoes is
        commonplace.

        -Katherine


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