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RE: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Years covered by SCA

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  • Jessica Ackerman
    MODERATOR NOTE: As a courtesy to our many members who receive this list in digest form, we ask that you not top post. Please trim text from previous posts that
    Message 1 of 80 , Dec 28, 2008
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      MODERATOR NOTE: As a courtesy to our many members who receive this list in digest form, we ask that you not top post. Please trim text from previous posts that does not require repetition. Thank you. Jehanne de Wodeford, Pacific Time Zone Moderator.

      MESSAGE ORDER REVERSED AND EDITED:

      From: Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com On Behalf Of Madeleine Delacroix
      I get that all the time, I am primarily 1570ish Venice(I know, I have a late period French name, don't ask) in the winter and 1500 Venice in the summer and I go from there, I keep getting asked why I would want to be that late....why?, because I like the clothes...

      When discussing our (then) upcoming Yule Court feast, it was mentioned that
      we'd be having ham, and turkey, which is out of period. I commented that
      turkey was period for me (1500ish Southern Spain). And I was informed I was
      SOOOOOOOO late period. ::sigh:: If I'm late period, I'd hate to think what
      my Elizabethan friends are.

      ~Alexandra Vazquez de Granada
    • Katherine Throckmorton
      I ve been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at feasts. It isn t the fact that they aren t period. Its more the fact that it seems
      Message 80 of 80 , Jan 5, 2009
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        I've been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at
        feasts. It isn't the fact that they aren't period. Its more the fact that
        it seems that when things like potatoes, tomatoes, chocolate and turkey were
        served, they would have been a novelty. These foods would have been new and
        exotic and serving them at a feast would have made a statement. Serving
        them as a ordinary part of a feast, with no effort to get people to think
        about how 16th century people would have seen these foods has the effect of
        pulling us into the modern world, where a dish of mashed potatoes is
        commonplace.

        -Katherine


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