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Re: Years covered by SCA

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  • wodeford
    ... What the Society s Governing Documents actually say: http://www.sca.org/docs/pdf/govdocs.pdf Period: The era used by the Society as the base for its
    Message 1 of 80 , Dec 27, 2008
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Madeleine Delacroix"
      <madeleinedelacroix@...> wrote:
      >
      > Greetings all,
      > A question has come up and since I can't get a actual answer from
      > those around me, I am going to ask here. I was under the impression
      > that the play dates were 600-1600, and yet I see Romans and Cavaliers,
      > which are pre and post those years.

      What the Society's Governing Documents actually say:

      http://www.sca.org/docs/pdf/govdocs.pdf

      Period: The era used by the Society as the base for its re-creation
      activities. The Society is based on the life and culture of the landed
      nobility of pre-17th Century Western Europe, focusing on the Middle
      Ages and the Renaissance. (Page 10 of the PDF)

      "II. EVENTS
      A. Society Events Defined
      The term "Society event" refers to tournaments, feasts, and other
      activities whereby participants can display the results of their
      researches into the culture and technology of the period in an
      environment which evokes the atmosphere of the pre-17th century
      European Middle Ages and Renaissance. It also refers to educational
      activities involving either one-time classes or ongoing Society
      university organizations, and meetings where participants share skills
      or discuss the business of the group."

      "B. Requirements for Participants at Society events
      Anyone may attend Society events provided he or she wears an attempt
      at pre-17th century clothing, conforms to the provisions in Corpora,
      and complies with any other requirements (such as site fees or
      waivers) which may be imposed. At business meetings and informal
      classes, the requirement to wear pre-17th century dress may be
      waived." (Page 15 of the PDF).

      And from the introduction, the rationale permitting
      non-Western-European personae and prohibiting the specialization of
      group branches in particular time periods or cultures: "For Society
      members, most of the world, and all of the centuries prior to the
      17th, can serve as a source for personal research. However, the
      further you go from the core of Medieval and Renaissance Europe, the
      less the environment we offer will resemble what someone of your time
      and country would find natural or homelike. For example, you can be an
      Asian or African guest at a European court, but you cannot expect
      others to share your special interests - like any long-term visitor in
      a foreign land, you are the one who will have to adapt to the customs
      you find around you. Since members have free choice of what areas they
      will explore, it follows that Society branches cannot decide to
      specialize in a specific time and place, since that would make it hard
      for members there to pursue their own interests in other times and
      places." (Page 9 of the PDF.)

      In short, there is no "start date" and the end date is supposed to be
      1601.

      Hope this helps,

      Jehanne de Wodeford
      West Kingdom
    • Katherine Throckmorton
      I ve been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at feasts. It isn t the fact that they aren t period. Its more the fact that it seems
      Message 80 of 80 , Jan 5, 2009
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        I've been thinking for awhile about why I object to New World foods at
        feasts. It isn't the fact that they aren't period. Its more the fact that
        it seems that when things like potatoes, tomatoes, chocolate and turkey were
        served, they would have been a novelty. These foods would have been new and
        exotic and serving them at a feast would have made a statement. Serving
        them as a ordinary part of a feast, with no effort to get people to think
        about how 16th century people would have seen these foods has the effect of
        pulling us into the modern world, where a dish of mashed potatoes is
        commonplace.

        -Katherine


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