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Re: corduroy

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  • borderlands15213
    ... looks as ... If I recall correctly on this point, the difference between velvet and velveteen is the direction of the ribbing before cutting: velveteen
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 13, 2008
      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Catherine Olanich Raymond
      <cathy@...> wrote:
      >
      > as far
      > > as I have seen, there aren't any cut velvets that are only done in
      > > stripes in any pre-17th c portraits/drawings/wills/ect.
      >
      > I know of one that's late 16th. It's labeled "uncut velvet," but it
      looks as
      > though it has horizontal ribs:
      >
      > http://realmofvenus.renaissanceitaly.net/workbox/tex16-48.jpg
      >
      >
      > --
      > Cathy Raymond <cathy@...>
      >
      > "The heresy of one age becomes the orthodoxy of the next."
      > --Helen Keller

      If I recall correctly on this point, the difference between velvet and
      velveteen is the direction of the ribbing before cutting: velveteen
      makes the pile by looping the weft threads, in which case the ribs
      should have been running parallel to the selvedges, and velvet makes
      the pile by looping the warp threads, with the ribs formed
      horizontally before cutting.

      I'm less sure of my recall on the source for this next point, but I
      *believe* it was mentioned and illustrated in the MOL "Clothing and
      Textiles" volume. (If not, I apologize for not being able to cite the
      source.) There was, earlier than the sixteenth century, a pile fabric
      with horizontal ribbing stair-stepped in three levels:
      low-medium-high-medium-low-medium-high-medium-low, and so on. I am
      completely at a loss, though, as to whether the "low" level was
      low-pile, or no-pile.
      Not much help, I know, and not corduroy, either, but it might be worth
      looking at.

      It does seem to me, though, that if you're using a very fine wale
      corduroy, it would be less obviously modern fabric if you can use it
      with the wale running from side to side instead of up-and-down as we
      use it today. (I know that affects how it behaves, too.)

      Yseult the Gentle
    • gedney@OPTONLINE.NET
      The transplated Flemish and Dutch protestant Walloons in Norwich in the second half of the sixteenth century were responsible for introducing to England a
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 13, 2008
        The transplated Flemish and Dutch protestant 'Walloons" in Norwich in the second half of the sixteenth century were responsible for introducing to England a lot of innovative fabrics, collectively called at the time the "newe draperies." these incuded the introduction or refinement of fabrics such as bayes (baize), and Mockadoe ( a heavy kind of napped "velvet" made with a linen warp and piled worsted -combed, not carded, wool- warp, trimmed and stamped or burnt with design). I think that if you were looking for a period verion of Corduroy, that it might be found in the "newe draperies..." although many of these cloth types were not meant for clothing... mockadoe, from what I can tell, went mostly to furniture covering, for example...

        Capt Elias


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