Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

corduroy

Expand Messages
  • oisswafford
    Greetings to the list, I have a question that I m sure has been asked before but the archive search keeps giving server errors. I was looking through my
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 10, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings to the list,

      I have a question that I'm sure has been asked before but the archive
      search keeps giving server errors. I was looking through my fabric
      bin and found 6 yards of fine wale corduroy that I originally planned
      to make a cloak out of. I made a wool cloak so now I'm trying to find
      something to use the corduroy for.

      Is there an appropriate use for corduroy in period at all? My persona
      is 1530-1550 English but I'm open to all options at this point.

      Thanks for your help.

      Gwenlliana.
    • Trish Mickelsen
      MODERATOR NOTE - As a courtesy to our members who receive their list mail in digest form, we ask that you not top post. Please trim text from the previous post
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 10, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        MODERATOR NOTE - As a courtesy to our members who receive their list mail in digest form, we ask that you not top post. Please trim text from the previous post that does not require repetition. Thank you. Jehanne de Wodeford, Pacific Time Zone Moderator.

        MESSAGE ORDER REVERSED AND EDITED:
        From: oisswafford <oisswafford@...>
        > Is there an appropriate use for corduroy in period at all? My persona
        > is 1530-1550 English but I'm open to all options at this point.


        I used a no wale corduroy for a tunic for my lord husband.  He is an archer & wears a turtle neck shirt undeneath in the cooler weather.  He really looked great in it.
         Hugs & Kisses,
        Trish
      • jubileel_insaneone
        Most sources state that corduroy was first made in Manchester, England in the (late?) 17th c. It was a popular working class fiber in the 18th c. So, too
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 11, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Most sources state that corduroy was first made in Manchester, England
          in the (late?) 17th c. It was a popular "working class" fiber in the
          18th c. So, too late for SCA purposes.

          Uncut corduroy is, basically a velvet/een. (They have a lot of it a
          Joann's and I've gotten it for a little over $2 a yard before there.
          Great stuff if you just want the look without spending a lot more on
          authentic fibers.) I've heard the argument that, since uncut corduroy
          is (like) velvet, that corduroy is really just cut velvet but, as far
          as I have seen, there aren't any cut velvets that are only done in
          stripes in any pre-17th c portraits/drawings/wills/ect.

          -Isabella D'Angelo
          >
        • Chris Laning
          ... I don t know this of my own knowledge, but the costume director for my high-authenticity Renaissance Faire guild allowed us to wear no- wale corduroy (but
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 11, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            On Nov 11, 2008, at 6:54 AM, jubileel_insaneone wrote:

            > Most sources state that corduroy was first made in Manchester, England
            > in the (late?) 17th c. It was a popular "working class" fiber in the
            > 18th c. So, too late for SCA purposes.


            I don't know this of my own knowledge, but the costume director for
            my high-authenticity Renaissance Faire guild allowed us to wear no-
            wale corduroy (but not the striped kind) as a reasonable
            approximation of "fustian" although the fiber content is not the
            same. Unfortunately it's sometimes rather hard to find the no-wale
            sort, especially in nice colors, as a lot of it seems to go from the
            mills straight to upholstery companies, bypassing fabric stores
            completely ;(

            As I understand it, while cotton fabric wasn't completely unknown in
            our period, cotton seems to have been much more common as loose fiber
            stuffing over most of Europe than as thread or cloth. With short,
            very slippery fibers, cotton is more difficult to spin reliably than
            either linen or wool, and reliable, fine, strong cotton thread wasn't
            widely available until (IIRC) the late 18th or early 19th century.
            It's not until then, for instance, that you start seeing a lot of
            lace knitting in cotton.

            P.S. Useless knowledge bit: If I'm recalling correctly (I'd have to
            search the archives of H-costume where this has been discussed
            extensively), corduroy and velveteen are both made with extra filling
            threads (weft) forming the pile, while in true velvets it's warp
            threads that make the pile.

            ____________________________________________________________

            O (Dame) Christian de Holacombe, OL - Shire of Windy Meads
            + Kingdom of the West - Chris Laning <claning@...>
            http://paternoster-row.org - http://paternosters.blogspot.com
            ____________________________________________________________
          • Catherine Olanich Raymond
            as far ... I know of one that s late 16th. It s labeled uncut velvet, but it looks as though it has horizontal ribs:
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 11, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              as far
              > as I have seen, there aren't any cut velvets that are only done in
              > stripes in any pre-17th c portraits/drawings/wills/ect.

              I know of one that's late 16th. It's labeled "uncut velvet," but it looks as
              though it has horizontal ribs:

              http://realmofvenus.renaissanceitaly.net/workbox/tex16-48.jpg


              --
              Cathy Raymond <cathy@...>

              "The heresy of one age becomes the orthodoxy of the next."
              --Helen Keller




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • borderlands15213
              ... looks as ... If I recall correctly on this point, the difference between velvet and velveteen is the direction of the ribbing before cutting: velveteen
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 13, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Catherine Olanich Raymond
                <cathy@...> wrote:
                >
                > as far
                > > as I have seen, there aren't any cut velvets that are only done in
                > > stripes in any pre-17th c portraits/drawings/wills/ect.
                >
                > I know of one that's late 16th. It's labeled "uncut velvet," but it
                looks as
                > though it has horizontal ribs:
                >
                > http://realmofvenus.renaissanceitaly.net/workbox/tex16-48.jpg
                >
                >
                > --
                > Cathy Raymond <cathy@...>
                >
                > "The heresy of one age becomes the orthodoxy of the next."
                > --Helen Keller

                If I recall correctly on this point, the difference between velvet and
                velveteen is the direction of the ribbing before cutting: velveteen
                makes the pile by looping the weft threads, in which case the ribs
                should have been running parallel to the selvedges, and velvet makes
                the pile by looping the warp threads, with the ribs formed
                horizontally before cutting.

                I'm less sure of my recall on the source for this next point, but I
                *believe* it was mentioned and illustrated in the MOL "Clothing and
                Textiles" volume. (If not, I apologize for not being able to cite the
                source.) There was, earlier than the sixteenth century, a pile fabric
                with horizontal ribbing stair-stepped in three levels:
                low-medium-high-medium-low-medium-high-medium-low, and so on. I am
                completely at a loss, though, as to whether the "low" level was
                low-pile, or no-pile.
                Not much help, I know, and not corduroy, either, but it might be worth
                looking at.

                It does seem to me, though, that if you're using a very fine wale
                corduroy, it would be less obviously modern fabric if you can use it
                with the wale running from side to side instead of up-and-down as we
                use it today. (I know that affects how it behaves, too.)

                Yseult the Gentle
              • gedney@OPTONLINE.NET
                The transplated Flemish and Dutch protestant Walloons in Norwich in the second half of the sixteenth century were responsible for introducing to England a
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 13, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  The transplated Flemish and Dutch protestant 'Walloons" in Norwich in the second half of the sixteenth century were responsible for introducing to England a lot of innovative fabrics, collectively called at the time the "newe draperies." these incuded the introduction or refinement of fabrics such as bayes (baize), and Mockadoe ( a heavy kind of napped "velvet" made with a linen warp and piled worsted -combed, not carded, wool- warp, trimmed and stamped or burnt with design). I think that if you were looking for a period verion of Corduroy, that it might be found in the "newe draperies..." although many of these cloth types were not meant for clothing... mockadoe, from what I can tell, went mostly to furniture covering, for example...

                  Capt Elias


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.