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Re: Headwear for late13th century/early 14th century question

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  • Elisabeth Hänsler
    Samia - Thank you so much! I am going to have to find the original images online now : ) I d swore I d never make another fingerloop braid ever again... but
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 8, 2008
      Samia - Thank you so much! I am going to have to find the original
      images online now : )

      I'd swore I'd never make another fingerloop braid ever again... but it
      appears I truly have a reason to now.

      If anyone else happens upon anything else, please let me know : )

      YIS,

      Elisabeth Hänsler
    • Samia al-Kaslaania
      You could try the tablet weaving technique that uses the weft as the edge stitching. :) I don t know how to explain it better, but it s featured in Crowfoot s
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 8, 2008
        You could try the tablet weaving technique that uses the weft as the
        edge stitching. :) I don't know how to explain it better, but it's
        featured in Crowfoot's _Textiles and Clothing_ . :)

        Samia
      • Cindy Myers
        ... There s a surviving cap that when worn produces a look just like the images shown on that website. I can t tell if the web-author made her interpretation
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 8, 2008
          > Samia - Thank you so much! I am going to have to find the original
          > images online now : )
          >
          > I'd swore I'd never make another fingerloop braid ever again... but it
          > appears I truly have a reason to now.
          >
          > If anyone else happens upon anything else, please let me know : )
          >
          > YIS,
          >
          > Elisabeth Hänsler
          >

          There's a surviving cap that when worn produces a look just like the
          images shown on that website. I can't tell if the web-author made
          her interpretation as a cap, or if it's a shaped piece of flat fabric
          tied about the head.

          For a full discussion on the surviving cap, and instructions for
          making one, see:

          Camilla Luise Dahl and Isis Sturtewaggen
          "The Cap of St. Birgitta" (p 99-142) in _Medieval Clothing and
          Textiles Vol 4_
          Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale Owen-Crocker. The Boydell Press,
          2008.

          http://www.boydelland brewer.com

          A friend of mine made one based on this article, and has been wearing
          it in the kitchen ever since. It looks adorable. :)

          --Emmelyne de Marksbury
        • Elisabeth Hänsler
          Thank you to everyone for their input. I love this cap/coif - I truly prefer it over the typical turbans I see people wearing usually. I am going to make
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 8, 2008
            Thank you to everyone for their input. I love this cap/coif - I truly
            prefer it over the typical "turbans" I see people wearing usually. I
            am going to make one based off of both of the sources provided... I
            will use a fingerloop braid because I have not learned to tablet weave
            yet.

            I will p ost my results as soon as I finish it... which has to be
            within the next two weeks. Joy, joy... but it is all good :)

            YIS,

            Elisabeth Hänsler
          • mary_m_haselbauer
            I had made one of those hats with from the temporo nostro website and I love it. However it went missing in my house and I started playing around with a one
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 8, 2008
              I had made one of those hats with from the temporo nostro website and I
              love it. However it went missing in my house and I started playing
              around with a one yard square piece of cloth and came up with something
              simplier that looks like the Mac bible image they are trying to
              reproduce.

              The square of cloth lays on my shoulders like a cape. I bring the two
              corners on my shoulders up under my hair and tie it at the top of my
              forehead. This looks really silly. :)

              Then I take the bottom edge which is hanging in the middle of my back
              and bring it up over my hair and lay it on my forehead on top of the
              knot. The other two free corners are pulled past my ears and tied
              behind my head. Really it is simple! It is actually more comfortable to
              tie this under my hair but it doesn't look as much like the 13th c
              images.

              Slaine
            • Cindy Myers
              ... You might not have to do either, if you don t want to. (Tablet weave or fingerloop braid.) The St. Birgitta coif is tied with a strip of linen that
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 8, 2008
                > Thank you to everyone for their input. I love this cap/coif - I truly
                > prefer it over the typical "turbans" I see people wearing usually. I
                > am going to make one based off of both of the sources provided... I
                > will use a fingerloop braid because I have not learned to tablet weave
                > yet.
                >

                You might not have to do either, if you don't want to. (Tablet weave
                or fingerloop braid.)

                The St. Birgitta coif is tied with a strip of linen that continues up
                and around, binding the face opening as well. For the tie, it is
                folded and stitched (apx 1 cm in width.) Originally, the tie was
                probably stitched to the opposite side, forming a loop long enough to
                cross in the back and wrap around the head as seen in other
                illustrations of similar coifs.

                So it would seem that you have another option, and one based on an
                extant coif.

                Hope that helps,

                Emmelyne de Marksbury
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