Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Learning to be a period painter (my goal update)

Expand Messages
  • Jewel
    I write this to the group to get comments, ideas, and suggestions on how to prepare for this goal, because I cannot begin yet, but will want to begin as soon
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 15, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I write this to the group to get comments, ideas, and suggestions on
      how to prepare for this goal, because I cannot begin yet, but will
      want to begin as soon as my eyesight is good enough to do so.

      My goal as a scribe in the SCA from the beginning was to look, act,
      and work as a period illuminator would. This includes tools,
      materials, and mannerism. However, scribing in the way it is in the
      SCA (manuscript-style scrolls) was mainly done by monks, and so
      manuscript-style scrolls are not appropriate artistic projects for a
      lady illuminator, who would in period do it for pleasure alone (if at
      all...it was frowned upon, but Julienne doesn't care...she does it
      anyway). So, I have decided to concentrate on a different type of
      painting, which would be panel paintings.

      A few years back, I read Il Libro dell' Arte with enthusiasm, and fell
      in love with the author's instructions and manner of teaching. In
      Julienne's time, this book would have just been written in Italy a few
      years ago, and Julienne's husband, while out soldiering, could have
      obtained a copy of it from Italy and sent it back to her. As
      Julienne's husband supports her artistic desires, he quite possibly
      would have done this as a very special present to her.

      Now, this is a very long-term goal, and I hope to follow Il Libro
      dell' Arte as close to the letter as possible. The first step is
      sketching on little wooden panels with silverpoint, so that's where
      I'm starting...I have a silverpoint kit that I obtained from Guild
      Mirandola at Pennsic, and as soon as my eyesight is corrected (and it
      must...it simply must!), I will begin my path in sketching. I'd like
      to gather any and all tools together as soon as possible, so that I
      will be ready to begin immediately.

      Here is where I need ideas and suggestions. Which Master(s) should I
      copy in my learning to draw? What Masters were there to copy in the
      1390's, and who would be most influential in that time? What other
      resources would be available to a lady who wanted to learn to draw and
      paint? Would she have a private teacher? Would she apprentice herself
      to someone?

      In the SCA, are there any panel painters and/or people who draw and
      paint, but don't do scrolls? I know of Master Tristan Alexander, who
      is a wonderful painter who does much more than scrolls, including
      Trump L'Oiel...are there others? I'm curious, but also know that
      learning from the Masters of the modern Middle Ages will be just as
      useful as learning from the Masters of the historical Middle Ages, and
      I am truly going to be the lowest of students for several years in
      this process, as I learn how to draw all over again.

      Comments, suggestions, ideas, and questions are welcome! I'm excited
      about this new idea, and look forward to many years of learning to
      draw properly

      Vivat the Dream,
      Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping
      Scribe of Atlantia
    • Amy Heilveil
      I know of Master Tristan Alexander, who ... While his work ins quite lovely, Master Tristan Alexander of Atlantia works, to my knowledge, exclusively in
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 16, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I know of Master Tristan Alexander, who
        > is a wonderful painter who does much more than scrolls, including
        > Trump L'Oiel...are there others?

        While his work ins quite lovely, Master Tristan Alexander of Atlantia
        works, to my knowledge, exclusively in acrylics and does not use
        period materials. He also sees no problems with this and has no plans
        to try working with period materials, the last time I spoke with him.

        Cu Respectivo,
        Despina de la has had several discussions with him on the topic
      • Jewel
        Oh yes, I know this...but he has used some quite period techniques, and his teaching style is wonderful (I ve taken a few classes with him, and his class on
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 16, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Oh yes, I know this...but he has used some quite period techniques,
          and his teaching style is wonderful (I've taken a few classes with
          him, and his class on shading with washes is how I first learned how
          to do shading, and my first work based on his teaching was amazingly
          good).

          Master Tristan does indeed use only acrylics, and I doubt he'll ever
          use period pigments...he's not interested. But that just means he
          concentrates on other things, and I can look to someone else for
          pigment stuff, eh? :P

          Vivat the Dream,
          Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel
        • Ann Catelli
          Christine de Pisan, The Book of the City of Ladies, I.41.4: [snipped] I know a woman to day, named Anastasia, who is so learned and skilled in painting
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 18, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Christine de Pisan, The Book of the City of Ladies, I.41.4:
            [snipped] I know a woman to day, named Anastasia, who is so learned and skilled in painting manuscript borders and miniature backgrounds that one cannot find an artisan in all the city of Paris -- where the best in the world are found -- who can surpass her, nor who can paint flowers and details as delicately as she does, nor whose work is more highly esteemed, no matter how rich or precious the book is. People cannot stop talking about her. And I know this from experience, for she has executed several things for me which stand out among the ornamental borders of the great masters."
            trans by Earl Jeffrey Richards; Persea Books, NY, 1982

            I have never heard of an illuminator being frowned upon, though she be female. I will admit that I have not researched the topic.

            Ann in CT
            Cecilia Dollmaker


            --- On Sat, 8/16/08, Jewel <avani_pari2@...> wrote:

            > a lady illuminator, who would in period do it for pleasure
            > alone (if at all...it was frowned upon
            > Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping
          • Jewel
            MODERATOR NOTE - Please do not top post to this list, as a courtesy to our members who receive their email in digest form. Please be sure to snip any portion
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 19, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              MODERATOR NOTE - Please do not top post to this list, as a courtesy to our members who receive their email in digest form. Please be sure to snip any portion of the previous message that does not require repetition. Thank you. Jehanne de Wodeford, Pacific Time Zone Moderator

              Message order reversed and edited:

              --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Ann Catelli <elvestoorder@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Christine de Pisan, The Book of the City of Ladies, I.41.4:
              > [snipped] I know a woman to day, named Anastasia, who is so learned
              and skilled in painting manuscript borders and miniature backgrounds
              that one cannot find an artisan in all the city of Paris -- where the
              best in the world are found -- who can surpass her, nor who can paint
              flowers and details as delicately as she does, nor whose work is more
              highly esteemed, no matter how rich or precious the book is. People
              cannot stop talking about her. And I know this from experience, for
              she has executed several things for me which stand out among the
              ornamental borders of the great masters."
              > trans by Earl Jeffrey Richards; Persea Books, NY, 1982

              I have not read that book, though I really want to. But from what I
              read, it is the first work by a woman in praise of women, and was
              written in defense of women, to argue why ladies should be allowed to
              lead in society, and talks about such things as women going to school
              like men and other topics that today would classify it as a "women's
              rights" book. Christine de Pizan was, in her time, a curiousity. She
              was widowed at 25 with three children, and was the first woman to earn
              a living as a writer...

              Christine de Pizan is only 6 years older than Julienne fille Gaspard,
              and Julienne has heard of her, but never met her...Julienne thinks
              Christine is a wonderfully brave woman, and would love to meet and
              become friends with her, but Julienne would never have the courage to
              work as a writer herself.

              It was frowned upon, but Christine de Pizan did it anyway (she was a
              women's right activist of the Middle Ages), and Julienne did too :P
              (Mundanely, Christinie is one of my favourite people in history, and I
              use some of her life to model Julienne's life after, and want to be
              very much like her...)

              Vivat the Dream,
              Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping
              Scribe of Atlantia
            • xina007eu
              ... at ... Hi Julienne, there are medieval illuminations of women painting, and Vasari even mentions a female sculptor so it seems that not even this field was
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 20, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Jewel" <avani_pari2@...> wrote:
                >
                > I write this to the group to get comments, ideas, and suggestions on
                > how to prepare for this goal, because I cannot begin yet, but will
                > want to begin as soon as my eyesight is good enough to do so.
                >
                > My goal as a scribe in the SCA from the beginning was to look, act,
                > and work as a period illuminator would. This includes tools,
                > materials, and mannerism. However, scribing in the way it is in the
                > SCA (manuscript-style scrolls) was mainly done by monks, and so
                > manuscript-style scrolls are not appropriate artistic projects for a
                > lady illuminator, who would in period do it for pleasure alone (if
                at
                > all...it was frowned upon, but Julienne doesn't care...she does it
                > anyway). So, I have decided to concentrate on a different type of
                > painting, which would be panel paintings.
                >

                Hi Julienne,

                there are medieval illuminations of women painting, and Vasari even
                mentions a female sculptor so it seems that not even this field was
                closed to women. The sculptor was a nun I think and I can imagine
                that a nunnery would draw freely upon the skills of the ladies in it
                to generate some income.
                Later (16th century) there are several famous women painters (e.g.
                Sofonisba Anguissola, Katharina de Hemessen), and I can't imagine
                them being around without previous examples.

                So good louck with your project!

                Best regards,

                Christina
              • Jewel
                ... Do you have to have any links or sources for these references? I d love to see them! Vivat the Dream, Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 20, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  >> there are medieval illuminations of women painting, and Vasari even
                  > mentions a female sculptor so it seems that not even this field was
                  > closed to women. The sculptor was a nun I think and I can imagine
                  > that a nunnery would draw freely upon the skills of the ladies in it
                  > to generate some income...<snip>
                  > Christina
                  >

                  Do you have to have any links or sources for these references? I'd
                  love to see them!

                  Vivat the Dream,
                  Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.