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Speaking forsoothly about the modern world

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  • Joan Mielke Yost
    ... [I]t sometimes difficult for the more historically-oriented people to ... the Iraqi war... At a very small local event this weekend, I overheard people
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 11 12:59 PM
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Jewel" <avani_pari2@...> wrote:
      [I]t sometimes difficult for the more historically-oriented people to
      > maintain their level (someone comes up to you and wants to talk about
      the Iraqi war...

      At a very small local event this weekend, I overheard people
      complaining about vermin in their vegetable gardens, the integrity of
      their employers, and a converstation amoung veterans about how to deal
      with war injuries that caused a forced military discharge.

      Few speak in the languages of the middle ages, but their talk was all
      of the world that existed in the mundane middle ages as it does today.
      I realized that almost nothing I heard or said myself would have been
      misunderstood in the middle ages (at least in terms of topic, if not
      vocabulary).

      When it crossed my mind that I would have a lot of e-mail to catch up
      on when I returned home, my first thought was "e-mail? what on earth is
      that? internet? and what IS a computer?!) What a wonderful escape
      into the dream, for me.

      Jehanne
    • Chris Laning
      ... I ve had a good deal of fun with language exercises in my classes, where (for instance) everyone is challenged to translate their modern conversations
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 11 3:22 PM
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        Jehanne wrote:
        >At a very small local event this weekend, I overheard people
        >complaining about vermin in their vegetable gardens, the integrity of
        >their employers, and a converstation amoung veterans about how to deal
        >with war injuries that caused a forced military discharge.

        I've had a good deal of fun with language exercises in my classes, where (for instance) everyone is challenged to "translate" their modern conversations into some 16th-century equivalent. "Sorry I'm late -- had a flat," for example, translates into "My good grey mare cast a shoe."

        The one sentence that gave us the most trouble is "I lost my car keys." No 16th-century transportation device I can think of requires keys, whether it be horses, carts or shank's mare! I think what we finally settled on was to simply say "I have lost my keys and cannot go home without them."

        More funny language stories on request ;)

        Christian de Holacombe

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        0 Chris Laning
        | <claning@...>
        + Davis, California
        http://paternoster-row.org - http://paternosters.blogspot.com
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