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Introduction from a new member

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  • Jewel S.
    Unto the group are greetings sent from Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping, on this fifth day before Ides, Anno Societatis XVIII. Good gentles of
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 9, 2008
      Unto the group are greetings sent from Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping, on this fifth day before Ides, Anno Societatis XVIII.

      Good gentles of the group,

      I am Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, a twenty-three year-old Parisian, now living in Germany with my husband, Baron Wulfstan Egweald, who is currently away at war.

      My birthday is September 21, 1369. I was born in Paris to a Parisian father and a Toulouse mother, both deceased. I have two siblings living, and two who rest in peace, but I don't see my siblings much anymore, as my brother is a soldier and my sister left France to be a governess.

      As a French lady in Germany, I am a bit lost, but am trying hard to learn the ways of this new land. I have been here for about a year and a half, and have tried to take on the local fashions and mannerisms, but feel out of sorts.

      I hope to, in this group, learn more about the German fashions, culture, and mannerisms so I can begin to settle into my new life here.

      My hobbies are painting, embroidery, seamstressing, playing music on various instruments, and working beside the manor's steward, as I love to organize daily life and celebrations alike.
      -----------------------
      Mundane Informatin: So that's Julienne...as you can see, she's more than just a name to me. I am working hard to come up with as many details about her life as possible, at the same time connecting her life with mine. Mundanely, my name is Jewel Shuping, and I am the wife of Eric Shuping (Baron Wulfstan in the SCA). I am 23, and we have been married 1 1/2 years. He is in the Army, currently deployed in Iraq, 10 months down, 5 to go. I currently live in the Barony of Tir-y-don, in the Kingdom of Atlantia (Hampton, Virginia), but will return to the Barony of Windmaster's Hill (Fayetteville, NC) when my husband returns on deployment.

      In the SCA, I enjoy the hobbies listed for Julienne, but mainly focus on illumination, with my goal being to be able to sit at an event and look like a true scribe would, from period pigments and vellum to the proper tools (no modern shortcuts) and a proper scribal desk.

      Mundanely, I am currently unemployed due to an eye injury that will keep me unemployed for at least 6 more months, so right now, I have to keep myself busy with hobbies...as a research geek, I figured this would be the perfect time to do the research for my persona development to make her truly real...and so here I am. I hope to find information to make Julienne a truly wonderful persona, but also would love to help others with their research, as I truly LOVE research, and I have nothing but time!

      Vivat the Dream,
      Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping
      Scribe of Atlantia
    • julian wilson
      On Sat, 9/8/08, Jewel S. wrote: Unto the group are greetings sent from Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping, on this fifth
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 10, 2008
        On Sat, 9/8/08, Jewel S. <avani_pari2@...> wrote:
        Unto the group are greetings sent from Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel
        Shuping, on this fifth day before Ides, Anno Societatis XVIII.

        RESPONSE
        Jewel [Gentle Lady Julienne],
        one rejoices to see your committment to detailing your background and personal history, the more because you base her in the Kingdom where this humble veteran soldier  resides, on the Southern Outer March of Insulæ Draconis, Drachenwald.
        One does one's best to compose many of one's own SCA-themed e-mail messages in such period "Early Modern En glish", and using the Blackadder ITC font; for, - most gentles having been exposed to Shakespeare's Works -  it does help the atmosphere; and is a simple way to contribute to The Dream.
        At any SCA event in ID, I always use "Early Modern English" while in my late-15thCentury Enclish persona [who "awakes" when I don my garb] - since that speech seems to have become the "lingua-franca" of the Society - easing the problem of communication between so many personas from times and places where other tongues would have been spoken, historically.
        Do keep-it-up; the more you practice the language, the easier it becomes, as I have found.
         
        One small point, however - surely it is A.S. XLIII [43] in the Arabic notation] and not XVIII [18]?.
         
        Yours in service,
        Julian Wilosn,
        [aka Lord Matthew Baker,
        dwelling in "old Jersey", and playing in "West Dragonshire" for the nonce].


        ---

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jewel
        Good Lord Baker, Surely you have caught me in a typo of the worst kind! Indeed, it is XLIII, not XVIII...perhaps I am time-traveling more than I should
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 10, 2008
          Good Lord Baker,

          Surely you have caught me in a typo of the worst kind! Indeed, it is
          XLIII, not XVIII...perhaps I am time-traveling more than I should (*grin*)

          About the language, thoug I do work to learn how to speak forsoothly
          (trying to remember to say 'mayhaps' instead of maybe and anything
          other than 'cool'), when I speak of wishing to learn the language, I
          truly do mean German. My husband is mundanely of German origin, lived
          in Germany for a while (and played in Drachenwald...he was so
          overjoyed to meet up with Her Majesty, Fiona, at Pennsic this year),
          and is fluent in German. For both my mundane life (it would mean so
          much to my husband for me to learn German) and for my persona (it'd be
          fabulous to be able to insert little German phrases, to add to the
          feel of who Julienne is...I do add French phrases here and there). I
          feel that knowing the language of the country my persona would be in
          would also help me research more primary sources, since translations
          can be wrong.

          As well, I have huge interest in girdle books and plan to make myself
          a full Book of Hours in a girdle book...all in German.

          All the same, speaking forsoothly is also important to me, as I do not
          plan to speak German to everyone (just with the people I know are
          fluent)...but imagine a lady going forth to an SCA king of English
          persona and bringing along a translator...it would bring a lot of show
          to court, or other such moments. There was a guy at Pennsic who went
          forth in court as a bararian and had to be translated for, but that
          was mostly silliness, because he was supposedly a mastadon-hunting
          caveman (*snicker*)

          Thank you for the welcome, and I hope to be able to bring much to this
          group. I am enjoying it so far.

          Vivat the Dream,
          Lady Julienne fille Gaspard, mka Jewel Shuping
        • Chris Laning
          To Julian and Julienne, greeting! I have thought for some time that I should revive and revise the class I used to teach on speaking 16th-century English.
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 10, 2008
            To Julian and Julienne, greeting!

            I have thought for some time that I should revive and revise the
            class I used to teach on speaking 16th-century English. Interest in
            it in the Society tends to come and go, but I do think there are
            folks interested, even though much of my own SCA experience is in
            groups that don't spend their time "in persona" at events.

            My own first exposure to it was at Renaissance Faire (one of the more
            authentic ones, I hasten to say, not the kind that includes elves,
            vampires and barbarians!) where the participants try to be "in
            persona" anytime the public is present. I taught their English
            classes there for a few years and have done so occasionally since. I
            focus on documentable English, rather than "speaking forsoothly",
            since they aren't necessarily interchangeable. Too many of the people
            I run across are under the erroneous impression that excessive
            floweriness of speech equals "period style" <sigh>.

            Unfortunately for the learner, I can't recommend any of the Faire-
            related resources out there (and there are lots!). Much of it is
            based on hearsay, or hearing other people attempt to speak
            "Elizabethan" English, rather than on any actual study. And Faire,
            being its own "culture," has developed its own "lingo" over the
            years, some of which is surprisingly close to 16th-century English
            and some of which is far, far distant from anything authentic.

            I can, however, recommend a couple of good books. They are both
            textbooks, but the second one is fairly accessible reading --
            unfortunately that's the one that's out of print. I'm told you can
            still find it, though. The first is more academic but also quite
            fascinating.

            1. Early Modern English, by Charles Barber. 1997, Edinburgh
            University Press. ISBN 0-7486-0835-4
            (Probably the best easily available introduction.)

            2. A Way With Words: The language of English Renaissance literature,
            by Gert Ronberg. 1992, Edward Arnold, ISBN 0-340-49307-0.
            (A bit livelier and easier to read than Barber; unfortunately out of
            print, look for it used.)

            I haven't had the time to contribute recently, but there is a group
            on the Tribes network called "Faire-Spoken" <http://tribes.tribe.net/
            fairespoken> that I'm sure would welcome you if you're interested.
            There's also a group of people in the Barony of Carolingia (East
            Kingdom) who had weekly workshops for part of last year in which they
            both studied and spoke early modern English, and I was quite
            impressed with how well they did (much better than most of what I've
            heard at Faire).

            ____________________________________________________________
            O (Dame) Christian de Holacombe, OL - Shire of Windy Meads
            + Kingdom of the West - Chris Laning <claning@...>
            http://paternoster-row.org - http://paternosters.blogspot.com
            also known as
            Christian Ashley, gentlewoman to Lady Stafford
            Guild of St. George, Northern California
            ____________________________________________________________
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