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Re: When were "growth tucks" used in children's clothing?

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  • Carrie
    ... sleeves ... I personally do this after the time I made my daughter 4 new dresses and then she hit a growth spurt and they were no longer wearable and she
    Message 1 of 25 , Aug 5, 2008
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      > What are your thoughts on a wide hem, to be let out to lengthen the
      sleeves
      > and bottom hem?
      >
      > Catharine
      >
      I personally do this after the time I made my daughter 4 new dresses
      and then she hit a growth spurt and they were no longer wearable and
      she had only worn them once. Now I add extra length in the hem to be
      let down. I don't worry too much about the sleeves because most of
      what we wear here in Trimaris is short sleeved anyway so I just make
      them a little long the first time. I have found that the dresses last
      a little longer this way.

      Grainne mhic Neill
    • sue_clemenger
      ... then that the use of such a tuck would be appropriate on gowns at least from this era on? It seems to me that even if they weren t used for growth tucks
      Message 2 of 25 , Aug 10, 2008
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        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Catharine Decker <cdeckerwi@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Thank you! This is very interesting. Would it be safe to conclude
        then that the use of such a tuck would be appropriate on gowns at least
        from this era on? It seems to me that even if they weren't used for
        growth tucks per se, if they were used for decoration, then it would
        still be acceptable. No?
        >
        > Catharine
        >
        Hi, Catharine!
        I've got several images in a book on Sofonisba Anguissola (late
        16th/early 17th c. painter), in which she's depicting children, and
        IIRC, the skirts of the little girls distinctly show growth tucks. And
        these are princesses of the Spanish court, in fancy clothing, so we're
        definitely talking upper class.
        --Maire
      • sue_clemenger
        ... be ... up ... Jehanne, I ve got pictures of substantial tucks in children s skirts in late 16th century Spain. So it s not just skipping from the 15th to
        Message 3 of 25 , Aug 10, 2008
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          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Joan Mielke Yost"
          <joan.mielke.yost@...> wrote:
          >
          > Would it be safe to conclude then that the use of such a tuck would
          be
          > appropriate on gowns at least from this era on?
          >
          > Actually, no. As far as I have been able to learn, this particular
          > feature of women's dress is specific to 15th c. Spain. I does show
          up
          > again later, but not until after the 17th century.
          >
          > Jehanne
          >

          Jehanne, I've got pictures of substantial tucks in children's skirts in
          late 16th century Spain. So it's not just skipping from the 15th to
          the 18th centuries and in adult clothing....
          --Maire
        • Hera Davidson
          Hi I wouldn t necessarily say that the tucks on the infantas dresses are growth tucks, as these tucks also appear on the dresses of adult women, such as their
          Message 4 of 25 , Aug 10, 2008
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            Hi
            I wouldn't necessarily say that the tucks on the infantas dresses are growth tucks, as these tucks also appear on the dresses of adult women, such as their stepmother's.
            Cheers
            Hera
          • Rebecca Klingbeil
            ... For those who may be somewhat confused: Sofonisba Anguissola was one of 6 sisters, all painters, from Italy. Their father was extremely forward thinking
            Message 5 of 25 , Aug 10, 2008
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              --- sue_clemenger <sue_clemenger@...> wrote:

              > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Catharine
              > Decker <cdeckerwi@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > Thank you! This is very interesting. Would it be
              > safe to conclude
              > then that the use of such a tuck would be
              > appropriate on gowns at least
              > from this era on? It seems to me that even if they
              > weren't used for
              > growth tucks per se, if they were used for
              > decoration, then it would
              > still be acceptable. No?
              > >
              > > Catharine
              > >
              > Hi, Catharine!
              > I've got several images in a book on Sofonisba
              > Anguissola (late
              > 16th/early 17th c. painter), in which she's
              > depicting children, and
              > IIRC, the skirts of the little girls distinctly show
              > growth tucks. And
              > these are princesses of the Spanish court, in fancy
              > clothing, so we're
              > definitely talking upper class.
              > --Maire
              >
              >

              For those who may be somewhat confused: Sofonisba
              Anguissola was one of 6 sisters, all painters, from
              Italy. Their father was extremely forward thinking for
              his time and gave them education and training not
              normally available to women, even of their class. She
              spent time as a lady-in-waiting in the Spanish court,
              and is best known for her portraiture, especially of
              her sisters and family. She was limited in her ability
              to take on commissions of religious paintings, etc.,
              because she was unable to freely study anatomy or the
              drawing of nudes. She eventually married an Italian
              (and later as a widow another Italian).

              So, if you look her up, you must look under Italian
              artists - even though she did a number of portraits of
              the ladies of the Spanish court.

              Leofwynn Marchaunt
            • Joan Mielke Yost
              ... in late 16th century Spain. So it s not just skipping from the 15th to ... Thank you for the information. I haven t had access to later Spanish images.
              Message 6 of 25 , Aug 11, 2008
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                --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "sue_clemenger"
                <sue_clemenger@...> wrote:
                > Jehanne, I've got pictures of substantial tucks in children's skirts
                in late 16th century Spain. So it's not just skipping from the 15th to
                > the 18th centuries and in adult clothing....
                > --Maire
                >
                Thank you for the information. I haven't had access to later Spanish
                images.

                Fashion was ever fickle, as it is today. I wonder though, why this
                design detail does not show up in art from other regions as did other
                Spanish fashions.

                Jehanne
              • Ann Catelli
                Because the Spanish dressed funny. I.e., there was a distinct Spanish style for as far back as I ve seen Spanish clothing, not exactly like the core
                Message 7 of 25 , Aug 11, 2008
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                  Because the Spanish dressed funny. I.e., there was a distinct Spanish style for as far back as I've seen Spanish clothing, not exactly like the core England/France/Lowlands areas that are fairly easy for an English-speaker to research.

                  I'm sure those Spanish people who cared thought all through all the years that foreigners dressed funny, of course.

                  Copying a style, as the English were so fond of during Elizabeth's reign, rarely means actually wearing the whole outfit as the source would.

                  Ann in CT

                  > Fashion was ever fickle, as it is today. I wonder though, why this
                  > design detail does not show up in art from other regions as did other
                  > Spanish fashions.
                  >
                  > Jehanne
                • Joan Mielke Yost
                  ... Yes, they really did. Jehanne
                  Message 8 of 25 , Aug 11, 2008
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                    --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Ann Catelli <elvestoorder@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Because the Spanish dressed funny.

                    <Grin!>
                    Yes, they really did.

                    Jehanne
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