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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: replica SCA-period bottles & wines

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  • Cynthia J Ley
    On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 05:48:51 -0000 Joan Mielke Yost ... ____________________________________________________________ Sweepstakes!!! Enter for your chance to
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 22, 2008
      On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 05:48:51 -0000 "Joan Mielke Yost"
      <joan.mielke.yost@...> writes:
      > Finding good glassware and ceramics is an obsession of mine because
      > in
      > a former incarnation I was an historical archaeologist. To my
      > knowledge, wine was served at table from jugs, not bottles. Glass
      > bottles did not come into wider use until the late 16th century, but
      >
      > the earliest ones were 10-12" around, squat and globular with a
      > relatively short neck. They were handblown and made of very thick
      > (1/2"+)dark green glass. They had a rough pontil scar on the
      > bottom,
      > but unlike later bottles, they did not have a "push up" or "kick
      > up."
      >
      > This link has two pictures of stoneware bottles, as well as a green
      > globular bottle. http://www.earlyglass.com/
      >
      > The Museum of London has a wonderful pictoral catalogue. There are
      > only a few medieval glass items, but take a look at the 17th and
      > 18th
      > century page for lots of bottle designs. While the bottles are
      > dated,
      > at earliest, 1601, the forms go back further.
      > http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/ceramics/pages/glass.asp
      >
      > Jehanne
      >
      >

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    • i_odlin
      ... Has anyone in the US bought from these folks before? They have some magnificent items on offer, but I m curious about how well cross-world purchasing
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 23, 2008
        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Michael Hurley <mephit@...> wrote:
        > Also, Medieval Design ( http://www.medievaldesign.com/indexengl.html
        > ) sells some bottles in their glass section.

        Has anyone in the US bought from these folks before? They have some
        magnificent items on offer, but I'm curious about how well cross-world
        purchasing works with these folks.

        Not to mention how good their stuff really is.

        Thank you.
        -Iain of Malagentia
      • Tiffany Brown
        ... Buller wines in Rutherglen, Victoria, Australia produces a malmsey. It is a very pleasant amber coloured fortified wine, reminiscent of a tokay. I have no
        Message 3 of 17 , Jun 23, 2008
          2008/6/21 julian wilson <smnco37@...>:
          > If anyone knows of modern vineyards which are still producing the same categories of wines as were imported into England between say 1450AD and 1509AD, - would you be good enough to pass that info along to us? It would be so cool to serve something like Rhenish*, malmsey*, and claret* at our feast table,

          Buller wines in Rutherglen, Victoria, Australia produces a malmsey. It
          is a very pleasant amber coloured fortified wine, reminiscent of a
          tokay. I have no idea how similar it is to European Malmseys, let
          alone period ones, but shiraz grown in the same region (due to the
          soil and climate) is known to be very full bodied and strong, even for
          an Australian shiraz (which themselves are known for their vigor).

          The winery's website is here:
          http://www.buller.com.au/index.html
          and a page about the malmsey is here:
          http://www.buller.com.au/source/pdf_wine_web/FO_Malmsey-web.pdf

          I have no idea if they will ship small quantities overseas, or if they
          have any european distributors, but they are a medium sized winery,
          not a small boutique (they sell in national liquor chains in
          australia) and their website has a special section for international
          orders which encourages enquiries.

          Of course, I'd find it very strange if someone in Europe wasn't still
          producing these wines, but they may not be as internet enabled or
          export orientated as Australian wineries..

          good luck, and I would appreciate hearing anything further you find
          out about how various wines available today compare to their medieval
          and renaisance counterparts,

          Teffania



          --
          . ___
          {o,o} The blog you are not looking for
          |)__) is definitely not at
          -"-"- http://teffania.blogspot.com
        • Beth and Bob Matney
          ... I do not know of wines available quite that old. Though I have seen claret for sale, I have no idea how it compares to 15th-16th century types of that
          Message 4 of 17 , Jun 23, 2008
            At 02:10 PM 6/20/2008, Matthew Baker wrote:

            >If anyone knows of modern vineyards which are still producing the
            >same categories of wines as were imported into England between say
            >1450AD and 1509AD, - would you be good enough to pass that info
            >along to us? It would be so cool to serve something like Rhenish*,
            >malmsey*, and claret* at our feast table, to complement redacted
            >medieval "dishes". Wikipedia says what they* are without giving any
            >idea if they are still produced anywhere!

            I do not know of wines available quite that old. Though I have seen
            claret for sale, I have no idea how it compares to 15th-16th century
            types of that name. The oldest wines that I have personally seen were
            some 150 or so years old Madeiras. There are also some quite good
            blends (incorporating actual antique stock) reproducing types of
            Madeira from the early 18th-19th century that are surprisingly
            reasonable in price (partnership between a bottler in New York and
            producer on Madeira). Madeira was popular early because it travels
            and keeps well. The Island was re-discovered and settled in the
            early 15th C. but wine production and export became important in the
            17th C and this may make it too late for your purposes.

            Beth Matney
          • Robert Van Rens
            I ve purchased from Medieval Design before...my experiences with thier dress accessories, etc. have been very good. Custome contact can be tricky, due to the
            Message 5 of 17 , Jun 23, 2008
              I've purchased from Medieval Design before...my experiences with thier dress accessories, etc. have been very good. Custome contact can be tricky, due to the time difference, but I very much like the items I have purchased from them.

              Eadric the Potter Rob Van Rens www.ironwoodpottery.com
            • lorddonal
              MODERATOR NOTE - As a courtesy to our many members who receive their list mail in digest form, we request that you not top-post over previous messages and that
              Message 6 of 17 , Jun 24, 2008
                MODERATOR NOTE - As a courtesy to our many members who receive their list mail in digest form, we request that you not top-post over previous messages and that you delete any text from previous messages that does not require repetition. Thank you. Jehanne de Wodeford, Pacific Time Zone Moderator.

                Message order edited:
                --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Beth and Bob Matney
                <bmatney@...> wrote:
                >
                > At 02:10 PM 6/20/2008, Matthew Baker wrote:
                >
                > >If anyone knows of modern vineyards which are still producing the
                > >same categories of wines as were imported into England between
                > >say 1450AD and 1509AD, - would you be good enough to pass that
                > >info along to us?

                Rhenish wine was a clear white wine that is produced from the Rhine
                Valley.

                Malmsey was a strong, sweet white wine from Greece, originally from
                Monemvasia in the Peloponnese.

                Claret was a light red wine from Bordeaux.

                Donal O'Brien
              • digital.princess
                Greetings! I hope this is somewhat helpful... http://www.mittelalterglas.de/
                Message 7 of 17 , Jun 24, 2008
                  Greetings!
                  I hope this is somewhat helpful...
                  http://www.mittelalterglas.de/
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