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RE: [Authentic_SCA] Re: table carpet

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  • Kammy
    I have a question dealing with table carpets, how big were they? Did they just fit the top of the table, or did they hang over the sides like table cloths?
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 3, 2008
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      I have a question dealing with table carpets, how big were they? Did they
      just fit the top of the table, or did they hang over the sides like table
      cloths?

      Also, what types of designs were used? Were they geometric designs? Or the
      floral types that we think of in Turkish carpets today? Would it have been
      feasible for a Scottish household to have table carpets that were panels of
      knotwork?

      Any help or pointers to books would be helpful.

      In Service to the Dream;

      Anne Cameron

      . . . when are you going to understand that being normal is not a virtue, it
      rather denotes a lack of courage. -- Aunt Franny, Practical Magic
    • Cynthia J Ley
      The Bradford shows various hunting and fishing scenes, with a pretty architectual rail across the top and bottom edges. Check under Victoria and Albert Museum,
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 3, 2008
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        The Bradford shows various hunting and fishing scenes, with a pretty
        architectual rail across the top and bottom edges. Check under Victoria
        and Albert Museum, images, catalog #T.31-1914. The V&A is also pretty
        good about giving dimensions. This particular piece has a marked slant to
        it, probably generated by the fact that it's worked entirely in tent
        stitch, which is slanted.

        It's my general impression that they were placed on tabletops with no
        overhanging bits. They were an exercise in status, and what good are
        status symbols if folks can't ooo and ahh over them? 8-)

        Arlys (I know, dig up those sources already!) ;-)

        On Mon, 3 Mar 2008 14:47:39 -0700 "Kammy" <klchinnock@...>
        writes:
        > I have a question dealing with table carpets, how big were they? Did
        > they
        > just fit the top of the table, or did they hang over the sides like
        > table
        > cloths?
        >
        > Also, what types of designs were used? Were they geometric designs?
        > Or the
        > floral types that we think of in Turkish carpets today? Would it
        > have been
        > feasible for a Scottish household to have table carpets that were
        > panels of
        > knotwork?
        >
        > Any help or pointers to books would be helpful.
        >
        > In Service to the Dream;
        >
        > Anne Cameron
        >
        > . . . when are you going to understand that being normal is not a
        > virtue, it
        > rather denotes a lack of courage. -- Aunt Franny, Practical Magic
        >
        >
        >
      • Katherine Throckmorton
        ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 3, 2008
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          On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 5:10 PM, Cynthia J Ley <cley@...> wrote:

          > The Bradford shows various hunting and fishing scenes, with a pretty
          > architectual rail across the top and bottom edges. Check under Victoria
          > and Albert Museum, images, catalog #T.31-1914. The V&A is also pretty
          > good about giving dimensions. This particular piece has a marked slant to
          > it, probably generated by the fact that it's worked entirely in tent
          > stitch, which is slanted.
          >
          > It's my general impression that they were placed on tabletops with no
          > overhanging bits. They were an exercise in status, and what good are
          > status symbols if folks can't ooo and ahh over them? 8-)
          >
          > Arlys (I know, dig up those sources already!) ;-)
          >
          > On Mon, 3 Mar 2008 14:47:39 -0700 "Kammy" <klchinnock@...<klchinnock%40comcast.net>
          > >
          > writes:
          >
          > > I have a question dealing with table carpets, how big were they? Did
          > > they
          > > just fit the top of the table, or did they hang over the sides like
          > > table
          > > cloths?
          > >
          > > Also, what types of designs were used? Were they geometric designs?
          > > Or the
          > > floral types that we think of in Turkish carpets today? Would it
          > > have been
          > > feasible for a Scottish household to have table carpets that were
          > > panels of
          > > knotwork?
          > >
          > > Any help or pointers to books would be helpful.
          > >
          > > In Service to the Dream;
          > >
          > > Anne Cameron
          > >
          > > . . . when are you going to understand that being normal is not a
          > > virtue, it
          > > rather denotes a lack of courage. -- Aunt Franny, Practical Magic
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • oisswafford
          ... Did they ... table ... designs? Or the ... have been ... panels of ... virtue, it ... Wow, I had no idea so many people would be interested. Here are some
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 3, 2008
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            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Kammy" <klchinnock@...> wrote:
            >
            > I have a question dealing with table carpets, how big were they?
            Did they
            > just fit the top of the table, or did they hang over the sides like
            table
            > cloths?
            >
            > Also, what types of designs were used? Were they geometric
            designs? Or the
            > floral types that we think of in Turkish carpets today? Would it
            have been
            > feasible for a Scottish household to have table carpets that were
            panels of
            > knotwork?
            >
            > Any help or pointers to books would be helpful.
            >
            > In Service to the Dream;
            >
            > Anne Cameron
            >
            > . . . when are you going to understand that being normal is not a
            virtue, it
            > rather denotes a lack of courage. -- Aunt Franny, Practical Magic


            Wow, I had no idea so many people would be interested. Here are some
            links I could find - they are mostly images. The info I could find
            about how they were made mostly covered tent stitch, there was only
            one or two sources that talked about turkey stitch.

            http://www.sca.org.au/pipermail/wcob/2003-October/002217.html - info
            on the Lochac carpet and links about half way down

            http://www.geocities.com/keridwenthemouse/rowanycarpet.htm - info
            about the Rowany Carpet done in Lochac

            http://www.bayrose.org/wkneedle/Articles/Canvaswork1.html - info on
            how to do turkey work and bibliography for the book I first found
            mention of the carpets in: Elizabethan Treasures: The Hardwick Hall
            Textiles

            I'm sure Arlys has more documentation but that may get you started.
            It's what got me started.

            YIS
            Gwenlliana
          • Cynthia J Ley
            I hunted in a lot of places--basically every embroidery book I could lay my little paws on. Most useful was John L. Nevinson s _Catalogue of English Domestic
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 3, 2008
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              I hunted in a lot of places--basically every embroidery book I could lay
              my little paws on. Most useful was John L. Nevinson's _Catalogue of
              English Domestic Embroidery of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries_.
              London: Victoria and Albert department of Textiles, 1938; Chapter I.

              Some books to look for:

              Beck, Thomasina. The Embroiderer's Story, 1995.
              Benn, Elizabeth, ed. Treasures From the Embroiderer's Guild Collection,
              1991.
              Christie, Grace. Embroidery and Tapestry Weaving, 1928.
              Digby, George Wingfield. Elizabethan Embroidery, 1963.
              Jourdain, M. History of English Secular Embroider, 1912.
              Swain, Margaret. Scottish Embroidery: Medieval to Modern.

              Search engines: Google is your friend.

              Arlys


              On Tue, 04 Mar 2008 01:18:25 -0000 "oisswafford" <oisswafford@...>
              writes:
              > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Kammy" <klchinnock@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > I have a question dealing with table carpets, how big were they?
              > Did they
              > > just fit the top of the table, or did they hang over the sides
              > like
              > table
              > > cloths?
              > >
              > > Also, what types of designs were used? Were they geometric
              > designs? Or the
              > > floral types that we think of in Turkish carpets today? Would it
              > have been
              > > feasible for a Scottish household to have table carpets that were
              > panels of
              > > knotwork?
              > >
              > > Any help or pointers to books would be helpful.
              > >
              > > In Service to the Dream;
              > >
              > > Anne Cameron
              > >
              > > . . . when are you going to understand that being normal is not a
              > virtue, it
              > > rather denotes a lack of courage. -- Aunt Franny, Practical Magic
              >
              >
              > Wow, I had no idea so many people would be interested. Here are
              > some
              > links I could find - they are mostly images. The info I could find
              > about how they were made mostly covered tent stitch, there was only
              > one or two sources that talked about turkey stitch.
              >
              > http://www.sca.org.au/pipermail/wcob/2003-October/002217.html - info
              >
              > on the Lochac carpet and links about half way down
              >
              > http://www.geocities.com/keridwenthemouse/rowanycarpet.htm - info
              > about the Rowany Carpet done in Lochac
              >
              > http://www.bayrose.org/wkneedle/Articles/Canvaswork1.html - info on
              > how to do turkey work and bibliography for the book I first found
              > mention of the carpets in: Elizabethan Treasures: The Hardwick Hall
              >
              > Textiles
              >
              > I'm sure Arlys has more documentation but that may get you started.
              >
              > It's what got me started.
              >
              > YIS
              > Gwenlliana
              >
              >
              >
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