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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: persona & religion

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  • Michael Hurley
    ... Indeed. And actually, I d love to get a copy of the Wycliffite Bible to improve my Lollard portrayal. I ve not really had a chance to look, but does anyone
    Message 1 of 49 , Feb 1, 2008
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      At 1:48 PM -0800 on 1/22/08, Rebecca Klingbeil wrote:

      >Wyclif's vernacular anyway. ;) <joke!>

      Indeed. And actually, I'd love to get a copy of the Wycliffite Bible
      to improve my Lollard portrayal. I've not really had a chance to
      look, but does anyone know if there's a version currently in print?

      >Actually, some of you might find the book _The Book: A
      >History of the Bible_ a very interesting read. It is
      >written by a man who was for years Sotheby's medieval
      >manuscript expert (his name escapes me at the moment).

      I think I'll need to pick up that book, actually. Sounds quite good.
      Another interesting book about the period is "Who Murdered Chaucer"
      by Terry Jones (yes, of Monty Python fame). It paints a completely
      different picture of Richard II's reign as king of England than
      accepted history generally produces. It, among other things discusses
      the Wycliffites and other literary and religious luminaries of the
      day. Quite enjoyable read.
      --
      Auf wiedersehen!
      Michael
      ______________________________________________________
      "..Um..Something strange happened to me this morning."

      "Was it a dream where you see yourself standing in sort
      of Sun God robes on a pyramid with a thousand naked
      women screaming and throwing little pickles at you?"

      "..No."

      "Why am I the only person that has that dream?"

      -Real Genius
    • bec_tonkin
      ... Hours or a Bible of the late 15th C.? For the type of Bible, the Latin Vulgate would be available to England in 1470-1500. Even printed copies. A whole
      Message 49 of 49 , Feb 23, 2008
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        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, julian wilson <smnco37@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Gentles of The List,
        > while this thread is current - may I add another question?
        > Can anyone recommend a modern facsimile of a medieval Book of
        Hours or a Bible of the late 15th C.?

        For the type of Bible, the Latin Vulgate would be available to
        England in 1470-1500. Even printed copies. A whole Bible would be
        more expensive and less common than a Psalter (the Psalms). Amazon
        has plain modern printed Latin Vulgate Bibles for sale. You can also
        get facsimile Gutenberg bibles (http://www.greatsite.com/facsimile-
        reproductions/gutenberg-1455.html) but I think $9,500 might be e bit
        more than you'd want to pay...
        There are facsimile editions online, here's links to a couple:
        http://www.humi.keio.ac.jp/treasures/incunabula/B42/
        http://www.bl.uk/treasures/gutenberg/homepage.html
        It might be worth looking in a Catholic bookstore to see what they
        have or could order in.
        Alternatively, digital editions are relatively common, and you could
        print one out for personal use. Google around for one.

        Books of Hours were often used by lay people, more so than Bibles,
        but modern versions suffer from similar problems as Bibles -
        facsimiles are made with very high quality and are exorbitantly
        expensive, and making one yourself is very time consuming. Cheap ones
        don't seem to be around.
        The Artz Hours are online here:
        http://littlepeople.net/artzhours/
        A facsimile edition of the Simon Bening (c.1500) Book of Hours is
        available from the New York Public Library, but it says POA, which I
        would say means $$$.
        http://www.libraryshop.org/flowershours.html
        There is a Hypertext book of hours online at
        http://medievalist.net/hourstxt/home.htm
        which is useful in understanding how much and what is in a book of
        hours, if you decided to have a go at making one yourself.
        This site is also useful:
        http://www.candesign.com/pwhaynes/

        If you are not too concerned with having an extremely accurate book,
        one way to go might be to get the text of what you would like to see
        on display - either the Bible, the Psalms, or a Book of Hours, print
        it yourself in a suitable font, and hand-decorate it. Same method as
        used by Gutenberg, just rather different technology...

        Hope that helps,
        Rebecca

        PS - searching back through the archives here might bring up some
        useful info too.

        > As Christians in the Service of King Henry VII, my Lady and I
        have a small altar in our exhibition-level, period-furnished,
        sleeping tent, - and as an extra display item for this Seasion, I'm
        making a copy of a nice 15th C. little Prieu Dieu that I saw and
        measured-up in a Church in Venice in 2005; - and I'd love to gift my
        Lady with a facsimile prayer book to add to that little display.
        >
        > Listers' suggestions and recommendations will be gratefully
        received.
        >
        > In humble Service to The Light, and to Drachenwald,
        > Matthew Baker
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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