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Invention of writing

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  • sparklingeyes1974@yahoo.com
    Greetings to the list. So I m reading my history of criminal justice book and am rather bothered at a section of text I m reading. I would welcome anyones
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 5, 2007
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      Greetings to the list.

      So I'm reading my history of criminal justice book and am rather bothered at a section of text I'm reading. I would welcome anyones thoughts on this ....


      "scribes invented writing in the 4th millennium BC using reds to inscribe pictographs or cunriform on flattened clumps of clay. These earliest forms of writing allowed not only record keeping but also promulgation laws. "

      For some reason that statement bugs me. Hasn't writing been around longer than that? Or am I just going nuts? Lol

      Lady Elizabeth
      Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile
    • Folo Watkins
      ... That s between you and your analyst, but the book seems to be about right. See http://www.ancientscripts.com/ws_timeline.html Cheers, Folo
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 5, 2007
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        >"scribes invented writing in the 4th millennium BC using reds to
        >inscribe pictographs or cunriform on flattened clumps of clay. These
        >earliest forms of writing allowed not only record keeping but also
        >promulgation laws. "
        >
        >For some reason that statement bugs me. Hasn't writing been around
        >longer than that? Or am I just going nuts?

        That's between you and your analyst, but the book seems to be about
        right. See http://www.ancientscripts.com/ws_timeline.html

        Cheers, Folo
      • Kevin Myers
        From: sparklingeyes1974@yahoo.com sparklingeyes1974@yahoo.com ... Typographical errors aside ( reds ? must mean reeds , and cuneiform rather than
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 5, 2007
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          From: "sparklingeyes1974@..." sparklingeyes1974@...

          >So I'm reading my history of criminal justice book and am rather bothered at a >section of text I'm reading. I would welcome anyones thoughts on this ....

          >"scribes invented writing in the 4th millennium BC using reds to inscribe >pictographs or cunriform on flattened clumps of clay. These earliest forms of >writing allowed not only record keeping but also promulgation laws. "

          >For some reason that statement bugs me. Hasn't writing been around longer >than that? Or am I just going nuts? Lol

          Typographical errors aside ('reds' ? must mean 'reeds', and 'cuneiform' rather than 'cunriform'), the statement seems to agree with what I've seen published in linguistics textbooks, writing has been around since about 4,000 BC. While cuneiform started out as a pictographic system, it evolved into a logographic and syllabic system.

          Cuneiform originated in Sumeria. However, it was the syllabic script that evolved out of Egyptian hieroglyphs that was eventually developed into a syllabary (one character=one syllable), which evolved into the Abjad (assigns a symbol to each consonant, but not to vowels) that was used by the Phonecians. This Abjad was in turn developed by the Greeks into an Alphabet (with vowels and consonants) that was in turn borrowed by the Romans into the alphabet we use now. The logosyllabographic system developed in china (logograms used for both their syllabic as well as their semantic values)came about a little later, about 1800 BC, many of the old chinese writings were on bronze sheets rather than clay tablets.

          For people who care, some of the above was borrowed from "An Introduction to the Languages of the World" by Anatole V. Lyovin, Oxford Univ. Press.

          You're not going nuts.

          -Cainnech ruach mcGuairi
          OL


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        • sparklingeyes1974@yahoo.com
          Ya I looked up some info on that too, well you know what they say ....... You learn someting new everyday. Today was my day hehe. Thanks Lady Elizabeth Sent
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 5, 2007
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            Ya I looked up some info on that too, well you know what they say ....... You learn someting new everyday. Today was my day hehe.

            Thanks
            Lady Elizabeth
            Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile
          • sparklingeyes1974@yahoo.com
            Ah ok thanks ... And looks like thr typeo was mine ....darn these blackberries and predictive typing Lady Elizabeth Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 5, 2007
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              Ah ok thanks ... And looks like thr typeo was mine ....darn these blackberries and predictive typing

              Lady Elizabeth
              Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile
            • Derek Estabrook
              (moderator note: Please sign all posts to this list. Thank you Despina) These simple records on clay that they were speaking of are actually dated far earlier
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 5, 2007
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                (moderator note: Please sign all posts to this list. Thank you Despina)

                These simple records on clay that they were speaking of are actually dated far earlier according to one site. 9000 B.C. is the date they give. 4th century B.C. is the date of some of the earliest writing systems that we have been able to identify. Doesn't necessarily mean they did not exist since I doubt it was a spontaneous revelation and probably existed long before archaeological evidence would show. The key I think is when was there a need for a written system to develop. People were not stupid and it would not have taken long once needed to develop a system.

                http://custom-writing.org/blog/time-out-for-your-brain/54.html

                http://www.delmar.edu/engl/instruct/stomlin/1301int/lessons/language/history.htm

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_writing






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              • Lilinah
                ... I think you ve got a typo in the above. I think you meant *4th millennium*, not *4th century*. Even writing systems such as Canaanite, which is not
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 6, 2007
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                  Unsigned wrote:
                  >These simple records on clay that they were speaking of are actually
                  >dated far earlier according to one site. 9000 B.C. is the date they
                  >give. 4th century B.C. is the date of some of the earliest writing
                  >systems that we have been able to identify.

                  I think you've got a typo in the above. I think you meant *4th
                  millennium*, not *4th century*.

                  Even writing systems such as Canaanite, which is not terribly
                  ancient, go back before the 2nd millennium BCE and Canaanite is
                  identifiable and readable.

                  --
                  Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
                  the persona formerly known as Anahita
                • Derek Estabrook
                  Yes, that was a typo. Sigrod Bjornson ... Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 6, 2007
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                    Yes, that was a typo.

                    Sigrod Bjornson


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