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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Speaking "forsoothly"

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  • Sandra Dodd
    -=-one of the really fascinating things about it is the noticeable change in language from the first edition, to the second. You can see a definite trend
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 22, 2007
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      -=-one of the really fascinating things about it is the noticeable
      change in language from the first edition, to the second.
      You can see a definite trend toward standardized spelling, grammar
      and word usage.
      Those twenty or so years seemed to have been a period of furious
      evolution from early modern to modern English.-=-



      It could've been just a more exacting or anal editor.

      AElflaed

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    • Exstock
      You can use http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/ to look up passages/read chapters in the King James version (use the drop-down menu.) For those interested in
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 22, 2007
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        You can use http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/ to look up passages/read chapters in the King James version (use the drop-down menu.) For those interested in Spanish, you can also look things up in the Reina Valera Antigua version, which is sort of the Spanish equivalent of the King James.

        Also, forget the 16th & 17th centuries--I want _15th_ century English:
        http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/midengpub2www?specfile=/lv2/english/mideng/www/mideng.o2w&act=text&offset=10075549&textreg=2&query=

        -E House


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      • gedney@OPTONLINE.NET
        ... No.. for one thing I dont think they used a publishing house style with an editor checking the manuscript... Bourne was pretty much self published, though
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 22, 2007
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          > It could've been just a more exacting or anal editor.

          No.. for one thing I dont think they used a publishing house style with an editor checking the manuscript... Bourne was pretty much self published, though he used a printer, the printer was a common "fleet street" type direct printer.

          Capt Elias


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        • Sandra Dodd
          -=-Also, forget the 16th & 17th centuries--I want _15th_ century English:-=- That s generally considered to be late Middle English, isn t it? Maybe
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 22, 2007
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            -=-Also, forget the 16th & 17th centuries--I want _15th_ century
            English:-=-

            That's generally considered to be late Middle English, isn't it?
            Maybe designations have changed.

            One note for those wanting to speak forsoothly: "thee" and "thou"
            should not be used to those superior in rank. Don't address the king
            that way, nor your knight if you're a squire, etc. That is the
            familiar, and should only be used to servants, tradesmen (unless
            you're a customer who can only afford a very small purchase),
            children, dogs, and God.

            It doesn't make much sense to speakers of modern English that God was
            addressed familiarly rather than formally, but it makes sense to
            speakers of French and Spanish and several other languages.

            AElflaed

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          • julian wilson
            Gentles of the List, This simple veteran soldier commends him unto you, and thanks most heartilie all who have contributed answers and conysaunce upon this
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 22, 2007
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              Gentles of the List,
              This simple veteran soldier commends him unto you, and thanks most heartilie all who have contributed answers and conysaunce upon this matter. For his part - now having much reading to accomplish, by your generosity of spirit in sharing your knowledge; - you may terminate this thread, if so be you wish it, for his "cup runneth o'er"..

              In humble Service,
              Matthew Baker


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