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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Needed: Books on Sewing Accessories

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  • Cynthia J Ley
    Check out: Andare, Mary. Old Needlework Boxes and Tools: Their Story and how to Collect Them. Lots of history, and a fun read. Groves, Sylvia. History of
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 3, 2007
      Check out:

      Andare, Mary. Old Needlework Boxes and Tools: Their Story and how to
      Collect Them.
      Lots of history, and a fun read.

      Groves, Sylvia. History of Needlework Tools and Accessories. Lots of
      history, lots of fun, lots of photos of period stuff.

      Arlys

      On Mon, 3 Sep 2007 16:32:11 -0600 "Jessica" <noinini@...> writes:
      > Greetings, All,
      >
      > I'm going to be doing some research on Needles and Pins in the 12th
      > Century.
      > Does anyone have any suggestions on where I would look? I have
      > three books
      > out from the library on general antique/historical sewing
      > accessories, but
      > I'd like to know if there's anything that I've overlooked.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Findabhair
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Tiffany Brown
      ... Definitely archaeological reports. For 12th C, the museum of London books are an easy place to start. The york archeology books are probably great too
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 4, 2007
        On 04/09/07, Heather Rose Jones <heather.jones@...> wrote:
        > Archaeological reports might be useful: small iron objects aren't likely to have survived
        > but bone or bronze might.

        Definitely archaeological reports. For 12th C, the museum of London
        books are an easy place to start. The york archeology books are
        probably great too (but no Libraries in Australia have any of them
        <sigh>) and should cover this period. Look for books that cover
        "small finds" "dress accessories" "metalwork" "household items"
        "textile items" especially.

        The trouble with pins is that it's really tricky to determine what is
        a sewing pin and what a pin used to fasten clothing. But since I often
        use sewing pins to fasten my clothing anyway, this difference may be
        moot. I imagine the sewing pins will generally be the plainer pins,
        and not the largest ones. Needles are a lot easier to be sure about,
        but watch out for large blunt bone, horn or antler needles. These
        would most likely be used for naalbinding, not sewing.

        The other point is that when I'm handsewing my 12th C garments, I
        don't commonly use more than half a dozen pins. I generally find it
        easier to match the seams together as I sew than have them pre pinned.
        I don't know if this is typical or not, but I really don't need many
        pins to handsew shapes that are mostly squares.

        Finally, there is a passage by Alexander Nequam translated in UT
        Holmes "Daily living in the 12th Century" that discusses what needles
        a maid should have. It's really a primary school primer designed to
        teach latin words, so the list may not be accurate in composition, but
        it should be giving a list of all the common types of needle (common
        enough to be known to a worldly clergyman) that existed at the time.

        Teffania
      • Sandra Dodd
        -=-http://www.metaldetectingtours.com/htm/ artifact_coin_finds_saxon_medieval.shtml-=- There s a thimble there and another one on the third page of the
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 4, 2007
          -=-http://www.metaldetectingtours.com/htm/
          artifact_coin_finds_saxon_medieval.shtml-=-

          There's a thimble there
          and another one on the third page of the Anglo-Saxon/Medieval section.

          AElflaed
          Outlands
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