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15th century stitching?

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  • Kareina Talvi Tytär
    Greetings, I have put a fair bit of time into the study of seams & stitches, but only for the early periods (largely sources like the Hogom find and other
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 24, 2007
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      Greetings,

      I have put a fair bit of time into the study of seams & stitches, but
      only for the early periods (largely sources like the Hogom find and
      other Migration Period Textiles, Woven into the Earth, Dainish Bogs
      and Burials etc.). This wouldn't ordinarily be a problem, as I am
      happy to keep my own stitching to the early periods. However, one of
      the ladies in the Barony has asked me if I could help her with a
      project she's about to start. A friend of ours has challenged her to
      do her next piece of garb hand-sewn. I told her I'd be delighted to
      help, and then asked what she is making. She has decided to make a
      houpalande. I have no ideas what stitches and seam treatments were
      used that late in period, and I am at a point in my PhD project where
      I really can't spare the time to go looking (and the only one of the
      above titles I own is Woven into the Earth, which wouldn't go that
      late). Does anyone know off the top of their head what stitches and
      seam finishes she should be using for this project?

      Thanks,

      --Kareina
    • Kristen Dahle
      Do you have access to a copy of Textiles and Clothing? There are some good seam and hem diagrams on pages 156-157. The common running stitch seems to be a
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 24, 2007
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        Do you have access to a copy of Textiles and Clothing? There are some good seam and hem diagrams on pages 156-157. The common running stitch seems to be a good choice for joining the fabric together, with a stitch length of 2-3 mm. There are examples of seams formed by overstitching two edges together as well. Although I haven't tried this, I imagine it would work well with fulled wool and give a less bulky seam. Hems, particularly on woolen cloth, could be folded up once or twice and sewn with a hem stitch, a running stitch, or top-stitched.

        Pax,
        Elisa

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kristen Dahle
        Here s a link to Dame Helen s site which shows most of the stitches shown in T&C. Pax, Elisa http://www.damehelen.com/sewing/index.html [Non-text portions of
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 24, 2007
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          Here's a link to Dame Helen's site which shows most of the stitches shown in T&C.

          Pax,
          Elisa

          http://www.damehelen.com/sewing/index.html


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kareina Talvi Tytär
          ... Thanks! Does anyone know if there is any difference in stitching between the 14th century and the 15th century? --Kareina de la anything after the 12th
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 26, 2007
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            Elisa wrote:

            >Here's a link to Dame Helen's site which shows most of the stitches
            >shown in T&C.
            >
            >http://www.damehelen.com/sewing/index.html

            Thanks! Does anyone know if there is any difference in stitching
            between the 14th century and the 15th century?

            --Kareina de la anything after the 12th century is so off her radar
          • Cynthia J Ley
            ... With apologies, can you be more specific please? I missed part of this thread (eeg for punnage, sorry!) because my Yahoo groups were down. Are you speaking
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 26, 2007
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              > Thanks! Does anyone know if there is any difference in stitching
              > between the 14th century and the 15th century?
              >
              > --Kareina de la anything after the 12th century is so off her radar

              With apologies, can you be more specific please? I missed part of this
              thread (eeg for punnage, sorry!) because my Yahoo groups were down. Are
              you speaking of embroidery or sewing? Any country/culture in particular?

              Arlys
            • Kareina Talvi Tytär
              ... Oops, sorry, in an attempt to delete all but the relevant bits, I deleted some of the relevant bits too! My original query asked after what stitches &
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 27, 2007
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                >Arlys wrote:
                >With apologies, can you be more specific please? I missed part of this
                >thread (eeg for punnage, sorry!) because my Yahoo groups were down. Are
                >you speaking of embroidery or sewing? Any country/culture in particular?

                Oops, sorry, in an attempt to delete all but the relevant bits, I
                deleted some of the relevant bits too! My original query asked after
                what stitches & seam treatments would be appropriate for a houplande,
                since I'd been approached for hand-sewing help from a local lady who
                has been challenged by another friend to do her next project by hand,
                and the project she wants to do next is a houplande. All of my own
                research on sewing has been earlier period. I don't know if she is
                thinking of any particular country/culture when she said "houplande".

                One of the replies I received pointed me to a web page which showed
                14th Century stitches, so I replied to that note asking if the 14th
                century seams were sufficiently similar to the 15th century so as to
                be appropriate for the project in question. The lady who sent the
                link replied to let me know that it would be (thanks!).

                --Kareina
              • Elizabeth Walpole
                A friend of ours has challenged her to ... Methods of creating a seam and stopping cloth from ravelling didn t change a lot (though there were some
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 27, 2007
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                  <snip> A friend of ours has challenged her to
                  > do her next piece of garb hand-sewn. I told her I'd be delighted to
                  > help, and then asked what she is making. She has decided to make a
                  > houpalande. I have no ideas what stitches and seam treatments were
                  > used that late in period, and I am at a point in my PhD project where
                  > I really can't spare the time to go looking (and the only one of the
                  > above titles I own is Woven into the Earth, which wouldn't go that
                  > late). Does anyone know off the top of their head what stitches and
                  > seam finishes she should be using for this project?
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  >
                  > --Kareina
                  >
                  Methods of creating a seam and stopping cloth from ravelling didn't change a
                  lot (though there were some changes) until the invention of the sewing
                  machine, you might want to look at this article
                  http://heatherrosejones.com/archaeologicalsewing/index.html the techniques
                  are grouped by fabric type (as that's the most influential factor in how you
                  would sew a seam than the century). Not all the stitches are equally popular
                  but it gives you an idea of a wide variety of different stitches you can
                  use.
                  HTH
                  Elizabeth
                  --------------------------------------------
                  Elizabeth Walpole | Elizabeth Beaumont
                  Canberra, Australia | Politarchopolis, Lochac
                  http://au.geocities.com/amiperiodornot/
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