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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Elizabethan menu?

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  • Ii Saburou Katsumori (Joshua B.)
    ... I m looking at what I have. Unfortunately, I m not sure that I have any specifically Elizabethan menus that I could find, but there are some more broad
    Message 1 of 7 , May 7, 2007
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      On 5/3/07, Anora Marchaunt (Christa ) <anorathepain@...> wrote:
      > I'm hoping for a little help, I'm trying to put together an example of
      > a typical daily menu and a feast day munu at court during Elizabeths
      > reign.....
      > Any ideas??
      > Anora

      I'm looking at what I have. Unfortunately, I'm not sure that I have
      any specifically 'Elizabethan' menus that I could find, but there are
      some more broad 'Tudor' menus. Hopefully these will help.

      From "The Tudor Kitchens", released by Hampton Court Palace, the
      following is a description of the dinner on an ordinary Monday and
      Wednesday for the Treasurer and Comptroller (this work focuses mainly
      on the time of Henry VIII):

      First Course:

      Bread (cheat and manchet): 10
      Ale: 4 gallons
      Wine: 3 pitchers
      Flesh for Potage-
      Beef: 1 mess
      Mutton: 1 mess
      Veal or capons: 2 messes
      Rabbit: 2 messes

      Second Course:
      Herons: 1 mess
      Cocks, plovers, pigeons: 1 mess
      Baked meate: 1 mess
      Fruit
      Butter

      It goes on to say "A course was more like a buffet meal than a modern
      course of one dish and only parts of it were fully eaten. The waste
      was passed down to the servants and their waste to the beggars at the
      gate. Waste was an important built in part of any royal meal. No-one
      could be expected to drink a gallon of ale (even though Tudor ale was
      very weak) and almost a flaggon of wine."

      The menu they used in the recreation at Hampton Court Palace at the
      time of the printing was:

      First Course:
      Cheat and manchet bread
      Beer and ale
      Wine
      Chines of beef with vinegar sauce (roast beef)
      Pestells of red deer (venison pies)
      Baked carp in wine with prunes
      Butter and eggs
      Wafers

      Second Course:
      Boiled Mutton
      Swan
      Cocks
      Roast boar with a pudding
      Cream of almonds
      Wafers
      Machpanes (marzipan)

      The small book further mentions that "both boiled meat and meat stock
      were essential parts of the Tudor diet".

      "The Tudor Kitchen Cookery Book" contains the following recipes and redactions:
      Roast Pork with raisin and rosemary stuffing (To roste a pig; British
      Library Sloane MS.234.b.fl7)
      Apple sauce for roast pork (Pigge sauce; A Proper New Booke of Cookery, 1575)
      Whole baked salmon with spices and prunes (Baked carp; The Good
      Housewife's Jewell, 1585)
      Lamb stew with chicken, quails and raisins (For to stewe mutto; A
      Proper New Booke of Cookery, 1575)
      Tudor bread sauce (A sauce for rosted rabbet; The Good Housewife's Jewell, 1585)
      Apple fritters (Fritters; The Good Housewives Treasure, 1588)
      Gooseberry tart with saffron pastry (Tart of gooseberries; A Proper
      New Booke of Cookery, 1575)
      Pears with spiced honey syrup (Wardens in Conserve; A Prper New Booke
      of Cookery, 1575)
      Gilded marzipan cake (Marchpane; The Treasurie of Commodious Conceits
      and Hidden Secrets, 1584)
      Hippocras (Ippocras; The Treasurie of Commodious Conceits and Hidden
      Secrets, 1584)

      "Shakespeare's Kitchen" mentions that "Feasts with fifty or more
      separate dishes were common for special events, but guests were not
      expected to try all fifty dishes. The assortment of dishes was
      presented so that each person could find something he or she liked.
      In 1617, Frayn Moryson, a travel writer, wrote of this English custom,
      'The English tables are not furnished with many dishes, all for one
      mans diet, but severaly for many mens appetite,...that each may take
      what hee likes."


      This might be an interesting source
      Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books (1888--with excerpts from two
      manuscripts) http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=cme;idno=CookBk

      The books I have:

      "Tudor Cookery: Recipes & History"
      "Shakespeare's Kitchen: Renaissance Recipes for the Contemporary Cook"
      "The Tudor Kitchens Cookery Book"
      "The Tudor Kitchens"
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