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Re: REALLY looooong tippets and kids...

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  • xina007eu
    ... veracity, ... having ... the ... Such a tippet , when attached to the shoulder of a dress, is called a ribbon of childhood (in German, Gängelband , a
    Message 1 of 17 , May 2, 2007
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Kim C" <ysabel_delille@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Sadly, I do not remember the source, so cannot vouch for its
      veracity,
      > but I seem to recall hearing/reading something about little kids
      having
      > extra long tippets (14th century, France/England) so their parents
      > could use them as leashes for going to the market and out and about
      > without losing them in the crowd. From what I remember, also, they
      > would be sort of tied or pinned up in the back when not in use as
      > a "leash". Can anyone substantiate this? Or any other practice at
      the
      > time to keep kids reigned (pun intended) in?
      >
      > ~Ysabel de Lille
      > Getting ready for the camping season with an almost 4-yr old and a
      > recently mobile 1 year old
      >

      Such a "tippet", when attached to the shoulder of a dress, is called
      a "ribbon of childhood" (in German, "Gängelband", a word that is
      still used metaphorically today although most people don't know what
      it originally meant). Often the toddlers also wore a kind of padded
      headband so they didn't hurt their heads when they fell. There are
      some Dutch 17th century paintings where an adult is shown holding a
      toddler by these ribbons. A very cute 18th century porcelain
      representation is here:
      http://www.tafelkultur.de/bamberg8a.jpg

      16th and 17th century tombs on the British Isles often show female
      mourners with what are either hanging sleeves or ribbons of childhood
      knotted or pinned up behind their backs. Unfortunately, one cannot
      always tell whether a specific mourner is supposed to be a woman or a
      small girl - the representations are often very stylized, and they
      all wear the same clothes. They tend to be graded in size, and I
      suppose the smallest ones at the back are usually children.

      There is a kind of "baby walker" in Shakespeare's birthplace, a
      contraption a baby was strapped into and then could walk round and
      round a wooden pillar - it's years since I was there, so I don't
      remember it very clearly, but you might find pictures of it online.
      It might look a bit cruel but IIRC it was in the kitchen and kept the
      baby away from the fire and the sharp knives. I am not sure when it
      dates from.

      Hope that helps!

      Best regards,

      Christina
    • lonewolfyca
      Hail! My son is the same as your youngest. At first when we tried the harness, he didn t like it because he couldn t run free. But our first venture with it
      Message 2 of 17 , May 2, 2007
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        Hail!

        My son is the same as your youngest. At first when we tried the
        harness, he didn't like it because he couldn't run free. But our first
        venture with it was actually March Crown in Red Bluff (West Kingdom).
        I know that it wasn't really a "period" item [it's a little monkey,
        its arms wrap around his chest and clasp together, and the long tail
        is actually the leash] but he was so distracted by all the interesting
        things at Court and on the Eric (and especially on the Merchant's
        row!) that he didn't care. It looked more like we were carrying
        around a favored pet, anyway -- and we loved the cute comments we got
        {"Watch out, lad, there's a monkey on your back!")

        And now.. he wants it on as soon as he sees it, and gets really mad if
        you try to take it off of him (and I'm so grateful, since we're off to
        Beltane Coronation in Cloverdale this weekend!). So if you see a two
        year old boy wearing a monkey, please say hi to us -- it's only our
        second event, and we'd love some new friends to talk with, and learn
        from (I would LOVE to get ideas for better garb than what I have)!

        Bright Blessings,
        Adrienne and Ian of Ravenshore

        > Just wanted to share a bit about harness's for children. My oldest was
        > quite offended as a toddler when I introduced a harness...she seemed to
        > think that it was quite beneath her dignity to be so ensnared. But my
        > youngest LOVED it. In fact, each time she was "harnessed" she "became"
        > an animal and acted accordingly. Everyone smailed to see my little girl
        > meowing adorably or prancing like a pony, but do you realize how long
        > it takes to do your grocery shopping with an alligator? (yes, crawling
        > on her belly, growling ominiously at all passers by) reading your posts
        > brought back many memories and I thank you!
        > Anna
        >
      • Sandra Dodd
        -=-Often the toddlers also wore a kind of padded headband so they didn t hurt their heads when they fell. -=- I saw that called a pudding. There s a
        Message 3 of 17 , May 2, 2007
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          -=-Often the toddlers also wore a kind of padded
          headband so they didn't hurt their heads when they fell. -=-

          I saw that called "a pudding." There's a painting of a kid with one
          on, somewhere...

          AElflaed of Duckford
          Outlands

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ranvaig@columbus.rr.com
          ... In English, they are sometimes called Leading Strings . I noticed anyone mention that term. Usually they fasten to the arm scye or shoulder of the dress,
          Message 4 of 17 , May 2, 2007
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            >Such a "tippet", when attached to the shoulder of a dress, is called
            >a "ribbon of childhood" (in German, "Gängelband", a word that is
            >still used metaphorically today although most people don't know what
            >it originally meant).

            In English, they are sometimes called "Leading
            Strings". I noticed anyone mention that term.
            Usually they fasten to the arm scye or shoulder
            of the dress, not the sleeve like a tippet would.

            Ranvaig
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