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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Looking for cookbooks

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  • Katherine Rowberd / Kirrily Robert
    ... What part of the 16th century is that from? You mention contemporary recipes in English sources but the combination of ingredients there isn t what I m
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 10, 2007
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      On Tue, Apr 03, 2007 at 08:08:23PM -0700, Heather Rose Jones wrote:
      > On the Welsh end, the only pre-1600 recipes -- in the formal sense --
      > that I've run across were published in:
      >
      > Bowen, D. J. 1954. "Y Gwasanaeth Bwrdd" in Bulletin of the Board of
      > Celtic Studies. 15:116-120.
      >
      > It includes two fairly brief extracts from 16th c. manuscripts that
      > are so similar in format, style, and content to contemporary recipes
      > in English sources that I would be astounded if they weren't direct
      > translations of some as yet unidentified (or more likely, lost)
      > English source. Here's an example
      >
      > mortraws brawn y wnair val hyn/ cymer gapwld a chic pork a verwer yn
      > ?a ai temprio a llaeth almons/ a thrwy y isgell y hvn dod ef wrth y
      > tan a dod yndo saffrwn a siwgr yna cymer laeth berwedic o?i ar y tan
      > a dod gyda melyn wie a chymysc hwynt yn ?a y gid a gwsnaytha allan.
      >
      > Mortrews of brawn are made so. One takes capon and pork
      > and boils it well and temper it with almond milk and with its own
      > sauce put it by the fire and put saffron thereto and sugar, then take
      > boiled milk over the fire and add egg yolks and mix them well
      > together and serve forth.

      What part of the 16th century is that from? You mention "contemporary
      recipes in English sources" but the combination of ingredients there
      isn't what I'm used to from 16th century English sources. Mind you,
      most of the ones I'm most familiar with are from the later part of the
      century. To my eyes, that recipe, with the almond milk and saffron,
      looks more medieval in style. But I guess it wouldn't be too surprising
      if the recipes were lagging behind a bit as they travelled west?

      K.

      --
      Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily Robert)
      katherine@...
      http://katrowberd.elizabethangeek.com/
    • Heather Rose Jones
      ... Both manuscripts are from mid-century -- but keep in mind that this is a date for the physical manuscript, not necessarily for the composition of the text.
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 11, 2007
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        On Apr 10, 2007, at 10:52 PM, Katherine Rowberd / Kirrily Robert wrote:

        > On Tue, Apr 03, 2007 at 08:08:23PM -0700, Heather Rose Jones wrote:
        >> On the Welsh end, the only pre-1600 recipes -- in the formal sense --
        >> that I've run across were published in:
        >>
        >> Bowen, D. J. 1954. "Y Gwasanaeth Bwrdd" in Bulletin of the Board of
        >> Celtic Studies. 15:116-120.
        >>
        >> It includes two fairly brief extracts from 16th c. manuscripts that
        >> are so similar in format, style, and content to contemporary recipes
        >> in English sources that I would be astounded if they weren't direct
        >> translations of some as yet unidentified (or more likely, lost)
        >> English source. Here's an example
        >>
        >> mortraws brawn y wnair val hyn/ cymer gapwld a chic pork a verwer yn
        >> ?a ai temprio a llaeth almons/ a thrwy y isgell y hvn dod ef wrth y
        >> tan a dod yndo saffrwn a siwgr yna cymer laeth berwedic o?i ar y tan
        >> a dod gyda melyn wie a chymysc hwynt yn ?a y gid a gwsnaytha allan.
        >>
        >> Mortrews of brawn are made so. One takes capon and pork
        >> and boils it well and temper it with almond milk and with its own
        >> sauce put it by the fire and put saffron thereto and sugar, then take
        >> boiled milk over the fire and add egg yolks and mix them well
        >> together and serve forth.
        >
        > What part of the 16th century is that from? You mention "contemporary
        > recipes in English sources" but the combination of ingredients there
        > isn't what I'm used to from 16th century English sources. Mind you,
        > most of the ones I'm most familiar with are from the later part of the
        > century. To my eyes, that recipe, with the almond milk and saffron,
        > looks more medieval in style. But I guess it wouldn't be too
        > surprising
        > if the recipes were lagging behind a bit as they travelled west?

        Both manuscripts are from mid-century -- but keep in mind that this
        is a date for the physical manuscript, not necessarily for the
        composition of the text.

        Tangwystyl
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