Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Viking Skull Cup

Expand Messages
  • avila629
    Does anyone know if Viking Skull Cups are a medieval urban legend or have some basis in fact? Does anyone have any idea about pics or ducumentation? I would
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 4, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Does anyone know if Viking Skull Cups are a medieval "urban legend" or
      have some basis in fact? Does anyone have any idea about pics or
      ducumentation? I would like to make one out of CLAY as a prize for
      largess and need a visual image. The only thing I was able to find was
      a post-SCA period reference to a skull cup Lord Byron had made from a
      skeleton found on his property. Not only is it OOP, but it's very
      dainty and hardly seems appropriate for a 10thC Norse raider.

      Thank you,
      Beah
    • John Groseclose
      At 5:38 PM +0000 4/4/07, avila629 wrote: Does anyone know if Viking Skull Cups are a medieval urban legend or have some basis in fact? Does anyone have any
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 4, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        At 5:38 PM +0000 4/4/07, avila629 wrote:
        Does anyone know if Viking Skull Cups are a medieval "urban legend" or
        have some basis in fact? Does anyone have any idea about pics or
        ducumentation? I would like to make one out of CLAY as a prize for
        largess and need a visual image. The only thing I was able to find was
        a post-SCA period reference to a skull cup Lord Byron had made from a
        skeleton found on his property. Not only is it OOP, but it's very
        dainty and hardly seems appropriate for a 10thC Norse raider.

        Thank you,
        Beah

        For what it's worth, Wikipedia says no, Norsemen did not drink from
        cups made from the skulls of their slain enemies.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viking#Skull_cups

        There are some articles linked from there.

        Iain
        --
        Inter spem curamque, timores inter et iras
        Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum:
        Grata supervenient, quae non sperabitur hora.
        De inimico non loquaris sed cogites
        Spam Delenda Est
      • Despair Bear
        ... Just off the top of my head I recall the Scandinavian story of Wayland the Smith, we was said to have killed his captor s sons and furnished a drinking cup
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 4, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          --- John Groseclose <iain@...> wrote:

          > At 5:38 PM +0000 4/4/07, avila629 wrote:
          > Does anyone know if Viking Skull Cups are a medieval
          > "urban legend" or
          > have some basis in fact? Does anyone have any idea
          > about pics or
          > ducumentation? I would like to make one out of CLAY
          > as a prize for
          > largess and need a visual image. The only thing I
          > was able to find was
          > a post-SCA period reference to a skull cup Lord
          > Byron had made from a
          > skeleton found on his property. Not only is it OOP,
          > but it's very
          > dainty and hardly seems appropriate for a 10thC
          > Norse raider.
          >
          > Thank you,
          > Beah


          Just off the top of my head I recall the Scandinavian
          story of Wayland the Smith, we was said to have killed
          his captor's sons and furnished a drinking cup from
          their skulls and given it to his captor as a "gift".
          You can probably guess how well that went over.


          Godric




          ____________________________________________________________________________________
          Bored stiff? Loosen up...
          Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
          http://games.yahoo.com/games/front
        • Beth Lokey
          The Tibetans have used human skull caps in religious objects. Some have carvings on them. You might try looking at those modern examples to give you an idea of
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 5, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            The Tibetans have used human skull caps in religious objects. Some have
            carvings on them. You might try looking at those modern examples to give
            you an idea of what they might have looked like. Go to
            http://www.azibaza.com/ and search for skulls. I think you have to click
            on "View by Pictures" to see them, otherwise you just get text.

            Mina





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Melissa Phifer
            I don t think the History Channel is a good resource...but who knows. I think it was on the special The Dark Ages or Barbarians II but they talked about
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 5, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              I don't think the History Channel is a good resource...but who knows.

              I think it was on the special "The Dark Ages" or "Barbarians II" but
              they talked about some raider who killed the king, took his wife and
              made a cup from his skull and would make her drink from it.

              I think she ended up killing him. Go women!

              Sorry I can't remember the name!

              -Elspeth the Lighthearted.
            • Lilinah
              ... While it is true that Tibetan monks made sacred ritual cups from the skulls of dead monks, many of those for sale today are part of the appalling traffic
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 5, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Mina wrote:
                >The Tibetans have used human skull caps in religious objects. Some have
                >carvings on them. You might try looking at those modern examples to give
                >you an idea of what they might have looked like. Go to
                >http://www.azibaza.com/ and search for skulls. I think you have to click
                >on "View by Pictures" to see them, otherwise you just get text.

                While it is true that Tibetan monks made sacred ritual cups from the
                skulls of dead monks, many of those for sale today are part of the
                appalling traffic in human body parts that has been going on in
                India. And I wouldn't purchase a modern one.

                Also, i think there isn't much of a relationship between Tibet and Scandinavia.

                --
                Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
                the persona formerly known as Anahita
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.