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ACTA ARCHAEOLOGICA issue on Viking Age online for download

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  • Karen Isaacson
    ACTA ARCHAEOLOGICA is distributed on behalf of the department of Archaeology at Copenhagen University, Denmark. Their November 2000 - Vol. 71 Issue 1 is
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 20, 2007
      ACTA ARCHAEOLOGICA is distributed on behalf of the department of
      Archaeology at Copenhagen University, Denmark. Their November 2000 -
      Vol. 71 Issue 1 is online and available for download in .pdf format
      here: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/toc/aar/71/1?cookieSet=1.
      Topics include The Early Viking Age in Norway, Viking Settlement in
      Shetland, and several others of note.

      EydĂ­s Gunnarsdottir
      mka Karen Isaacson
    • Rebecca Klingbeil
      I have been avidly looking at some digitalized medieval manuscripts on a website of the Heidelberg University Library (manuscripts from the Bibliotheca
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 20, 2007
        I have been avidly looking at some digitalized
        medieval manuscripts on a website of the Heidelberg
        University Library (manuscripts from the Bibliotheca
        Palatina). The front page of the website -
        http://www.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/helios/fachinfo/www/kunst/digi/engl_welcome.html

        - has an English version. Otherwise I am making due
        with a German/English dictionary.

        However, there are two words - titles of nobility -
        that I can't find the translation for, and I was
        hoping maybe someone could help me. (These are from
        titles for illustrations from the Codex Manesse from
        the 14th c.). Any help, please?

        These I know:
        Konig = King; Herzog = Duke; Graf = Count / Earl; Herr
        = Sir

        But what are "Markgraf" and "Schenk", please?

        Thanks for any help,
        Leofwynn
      • Amy Heilveil
        ... From page 22 of The Burgermeister s Daughter by Steven Ozment ISBN 0060977213 The title Schenk means cupbearer ... which originally described unfree
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 20, 2007
          >
          >
          > But what are "Markgraf" and "Schenk", please?
          >
          > Thanks for any help,
          > Leofwynn


          From page 22 of "The Burgermeister's Daughter" by Steven Ozment ISBN
          0060977213

          "The title Schenk means "cupbearer"... which originally described unfree
          servants of the Holy Roman Emperor, which dated back to the eighth
          century.... they then provided shelter and lodging whenever the Emperor
          came through their lands. In exchange for the use of royal land, they built
          and maintained castles on the emperor's behalf, from which, as virtual
          imperial governors, they monitored the emperor's possessions throughout the
          empire.... by the thirteenth century the lands and Schenks governed began to
          be treated as hereditary and the Schenks became locally powerful dynasties
          in their own right, even though in the hierarchy or imperial royalty they
          remained very small fish."

          The quote is broken from the page to contain the pertinent portions.. this
          is not an exact quote, as portions have been left out.

          I hope this is helpful,
          Smiles,
          Despina de la off to bed


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lyle H. Gray
          ... I think Markgraf would be the equivalent of Marquess/Marquis. Lyle -- Lyle H. Gray gray@cs.umass.edu -- text only, please
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 20, 2007
            On Tue, 20 Mar 2007, Rebecca Klingbeil wrote:

            > But what are "Markgraf" and "Schenk", please?

            I think "Markgraf" would be the equivalent of Marquess/Marquis.

            Lyle

            --
            Lyle H. Gray
            gray@... -- text only, please
            http://members.verizon.net/~vze3wwx7
            --
            Shared knowledge is preserved knowledge.
          • balanttina
            hello! Markgraf means border count, that is a count that was given authority in the border regions of Frankish lands, in present day Slovenia and Austria.
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 21, 2007
              hello!

              'Markgraf' means border count, that is a count that was given
              authority in the border regions of Frankish lands, in present day
              Slovenia and Austria. These regions were called border counties (in
              Slovenian krajina, marka (both singular)). Title Markgraf (and Graf)
              was introduced in the Frankish region of these lands and has been in
              use up until 14C, I think (should go consult some books for that
              information).

              I have never encountered 'Schenk'.

              lp, celestina (from slovenia, a some-time-lurker-here)
            • julian wilson
              balanttina wrote: SNIP Markgraf means border count, that is a count that was given authority in the border regions of Frankish
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 21, 2007
                balanttina <balanttina@...> wrote:
                SNIP

                'Markgraf' means border count, that is a count that was given authority in the border regions of Frankish lands, in present day Slovenia and Austria. These regions were called border counties (in Slovenian krajina, marka (both singular)). Title Markgraf (and Graf) was introduced in the Frankish region of these lands and has been in use up until 14C, I think (should go consult some books for that information).

                I have never encountered 'Schenk'.
                MORE COMMENT
                Hello, too, - in case the comparison may be helpful, think of the the English equivalent for "Markgraf" as being "Lord of The Marches" - the "Marches" being defined as the Border areas between medieval English territory, and adjoining Polities - []i.e. France and Aquitaine; Wales and England, and Scotland and England.

                "Schenk" is a new Title for me, too - and though I noticed it in my copy of the Manesse Codex, I haven't researched it yet.

                Yours In Service to The Light, and our Dream,
                Matthew Baker,
                dwelling in "old" Jersey





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