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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Random music question

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  • Lyle H. Gray
    ... I ve got it listed as a piece by Henry Purcell, who was a late 17th century composer. Lyle -- Lyle H. Gray gray@cs.umass.edu -- text only, please
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 7, 2007
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      On Wed, 7 Mar 2007, Terri Morgan wrote:

      > A while ago I learned a 'charming' duet sung as a round that
      > started with the words, "When Cecilia was learning on her
      > spinet to play," - slightly risqu� and I loved singing it
      > with Master John Littleton to make people laugh but now I
      > wonder... is the song even in our 'time period' or is it a
      > later-than-1600 piece?
      >
      > It's that early morning woke-up-with-a-song-in-my-head sort
      > of wondering.
      >
      > Does anyone know?

      I've got it listed as a piece by Henry Purcell, who was a late
      17th century composer.

      Lyle

      --
      Lyle H. Gray
      gray@... -- text only, please
      http://members.verizon.net/~vze3wwx7
      --
      Shared knowledge is preserved knowledge.
    • glaukopisathene
      My source lists the composer as John Isum (c. 1680-1726), who lived slightly later than Purcell. So the song isn t period by any means, but it s definitely a
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 7, 2007
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        My source lists the composer as John Isum (c. 1680-1726), who lived
        slightly later than Purcell. So the song isn't period by any means,
        but it's definitely a lesser evil than some of the other "bawdy" songs
        that are commonly performed at events...


        Vittoria

        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Lyle H. Gray" <gray@...> wrote:
        >
        > On Wed, 7 Mar 2007, Terri Morgan wrote:
        >
        > > is the song even in our 'time period' or is it a
        > > later-than-1600 piece?

        >
        > I've got it listed as a piece by Henry Purcell, who was a late
        > 17th century composer.
        >
      • Sandra Dodd
        There are songs that aren t good for arts competitions because they re out of period, but that are still old enough to be evocative of the period. A song
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 7, 2007
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          There are songs that aren't good for arts competitions because
          they're out of period, but that are still old enough to be evocative
          of the period. A song about sailors might be a great bardic circle
          piece, or fantastic for singing after a small feast so people can
          beat on the tables and sing along. But *which* song about sailors?
          One of the female-in-disguise pieces might be great, but something
          about whaling and New Zealand... not great. <g>

          I use dishes that "aren't period." Period dishes are in museums.
          But if I choose a goblet and a plate that remind me of Renaissance
          paintings, they'll probably remind others of that too.

          Another Laurel was showing me some shoes she got at Walmart that look
          like period shoes. HOW COOL! I was wearing shoes Richard of
          Wolfswood made; hers looked as cool as mine did. Not that I don't
          love mine, but the thing is that appearances and impressions are
          worthwhile considerations.

          Some people rate documentability higher than they do appearance or
          courtesy. We don't need to agree on what the order of priority
          should be, we just need to remember that different people have
          different priorities.

          On the spinet song question, and on cornucopia type questions, one
          excellent source is the Oxford English Dictionary. If a term is
          clearly out of period, you can date writings by that, sometimes. If
          the word "cornucopia" was being used, then the idea was still
          current. As it means "horn of plenty," it's not likely to have been
          referring to something other than that image. It's the name for an
          image, for a motif.

          A spinet was a little harpsichord, and nowadays refers to a small
          piano. For a while, back in the every-home-had-a-reed-organ day,
          there were spinet organs. But there weren't spinets before 1600.
          There were clavichords and harpsichords.. Those words aren't going
          to fit into that song. <g> And "organ" is just a little too... meaty
          a term to put into a sexual innuendo song...

          I would go "time and place" on a song like that, and use it at less
          informal times.

          AElflaed
          Outlands
        • Cynthia J Ley
          That s interesting. I show it as being by John Hum (or Hume), c. 1600. If this attribution is correct, then for all intents and purposes I think you could use
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 7, 2007
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            That's interesting. I show it as being by John Hum (or Hume), c. 1600. If
            this attribution is correct, then for all intents and purposes I think
            you could use it, considering the primary English Renaissance styles
            (madrigal and ayre) didn't die out until about 1620 or so.


            Arlys

            On Wed, 7 Mar 2007 08:23:04 -0500 (EST) "Lyle H. Gray"
            <gray@...> writes:
            > On Wed, 7 Mar 2007, Terri Morgan wrote:
            >
            > > A while ago I learned a 'charming' duet sung as a round that
            > > started with the words, "When Cecilia was learning on her
            > > spinet to play," - slightly risqu� and I loved singing it
            > > with Master John Littleton to make people laugh but now I
            > > wonder... is the song even in our 'time period' or is it a
            > > later-than-1600 piece?
            > >
            > > It's that early morning woke-up-with-a-song-in-my-head sort
            > > of wondering.
            > >
            > > Does anyone know?
            >
            > I've got it listed as a piece by Henry Purcell, who was a late
            > 17th century composer.
            >
            > Lyle
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