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Re: [Authentic_SCA] cornucopia ...

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  • John Groseclose
    ... I m still just a little confused - is your definition of a modern cornucopia hinged on whether or not the horn is a woven basket? Iain -- Inter spem
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 6, 2007
      At 11:28 PM -0500 3/6/07, Susan B. Farmer wrote:

      >Yes. That's the greco-roman illustration. However, unless you know
      >that's a cornucopia that she's holding, it's not obvious. The
      >"modern" cornucopis
      >http://growabrain.typepad.com/growabrain/cornucopia.gif
      >is what I'm looking for ... After the greco-roman period, are there
      >depictions of the cornucopia in period art? Or is it a motif that
      >basically disappears until the Victorian Age?

      I'm still just a little confused - is your definition of a "modern"
      cornucopia hinged on whether or not the "horn" is a woven basket?

      Iain
      --
      Inter spem curamque, timores inter et iras
      Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum:
      Grata supervenient, quae non sperabitur hora.
      De inimico non loquaris sed cogites
      Spam Delenda Est
    • Susan B. Farmer
      ... In the illustration that you showed, fruit and/or vegetables were not evident -- all that I saw was the horn itself. I don t care what the horn is made
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 6, 2007
        Quoting John Groseclose <iain@...>:

        > At 11:28 PM -0500 3/6/07, Susan B. Farmer wrote:
        >
        >> Yes. That's the greco-roman illustration. However, unless you know
        >> that's a cornucopia that she's holding, it's not obvious. The
        >> "modern" cornucopis
        >> http://growabrain.typepad.com/growabrain/cornucopia.gif
        >> is what I'm looking for ... After the greco-roman period, are there
        >> depictions of the cornucopia in period art? Or is it a motif that
        >> basically disappears until the Victorian Age?
        >
        > I'm still just a little confused - is your definition of a "modern"
        > cornucopia hinged on whether or not the "horn" is a woven basket?

        In the illustration that you showed, fruit and/or vegetables were not
        evident -- all that I saw was the horn itself. I don't care what the
        horn is made out of -- I'm looking for period depictions of a
        cornucopia that is a horn/basket with an abundance of produce -- not
        just a horn.

        jerusha
        -----
        Susan Farmer
        sfarmer@...
        University of Tennessee
        Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
        http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
      • Susan B. Farmer
        ... regardless of my inability to express myself properly, are there post greco-roman depictions of the cornucopia in SCA period art? Are there any from the
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 6, 2007
          Quoting John Groseclose <iain@...>:

          > After the greco-roman period, are there
          >> depictions of the cornucopia in period art? Or is it a motif that
          >> basically disappears until the Victorian Age?
          >
          > I'm still just a little confused - is your definition of a "modern"
          > cornucopia hinged on whether or not the "horn" is a woven basket?
          >

          regardless of my inability to express myself properly, are there post
          greco-roman depictions of the cornucopia in SCA period art? Are there
          any from the 16th century? or the 12th century?

          jerusha
          -----
          Susan Farmer
          sfarmer@...
          University of Tennessee
          Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
          http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
        • John Groseclose
          ... Greek: http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/Ploutos.html - as with many of the Greco-Roman depictions, the cornucopia contains wheat, not fruit or vegetables.
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 7, 2007
            At 11:59 PM -0500 3/6/07, Susan B. Farmer wrote:

            >In the illustration that you showed, fruit and/or vegetables were not
            >evident -- all that I saw was the horn itself. I don't care what the
            >horn is made out of -- I'm looking for period depictions of a
            >cornucopia that is a horn/basket with an abundance of produce -- not
            >just a horn.
            >
            >jerusha

            Greek: http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/Ploutos.html - as with many of
            the Greco-Roman depictions, the cornucopia contains wheat, not fruit
            or vegetables.

            See also:
            http://www.theoi.com/Gallery/K14.5.html
            http://www.theoi.com/Gallery/K14.6.html
            http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Dionysos_Ariadne_BM_311.jpg
            http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Livia_statue.jpg

            Since my own field of study was Greco-Roman mythology for a bit, I've
            got more knowledge about that period and its artwork than the later
            periods (well, except for 12th-15th century Scotland and the North
            Atlantic area).

            However:

            http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/exhibits/rubens/exhibition/myth1detail.html
            - while slightly post-period, this would seem to indicate that the
            imagery of the cornucopia hadn't been entirely forgotten in the
            interim.

            http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=943 -
            1530, Dosso Dossi. So, the imagery of the cornucopia was definitely
            used in contemporary artworks of the time.

            Hope this helps.

            Iain
            --
            Inter spem curamque, timores inter et iras
            Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum:
            Grata supervenient, quae non sperabitur hora.
            De inimico non loquaris sed cogites
            Spam Delenda Est
          • Amy Heilveil
            I ve seen cornocopia in a fair number of 15th century through modern artwork. A fair number in Italian book of hours pages. Hope this is helpful. Let me know
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 7, 2007
              I've seen cornocopia in a fair number of 15th century through modern
              artwork. A fair number in Italian book of hours pages.

              Hope this is helpful. Let me know if you need scans and I'll go through a
              few of my books and send them to you off list.

              Smiles,
              Despina de la baby got up at 4:30am today... ugh.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Lilinah
              ... Look into Renaissance Italy, as that was the time and place that revived of Greco-Roman imagery, philosophy, mythology, etc. (re-interpreted, of course) --
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 8, 2007
                jerusha wrote:
                >I know that the cornucopia is greco-roman -- what's the earliest
                >depiction of the "modern" cornucopia? Does it occur within the SCA
                >period? I'm not sure how to go about tracking something like this down.

                Look into Renaissance Italy, as that was the time and place that
                revived of Greco-Roman imagery, philosophy, mythology, etc.
                (re-interpreted, of course)

                --
                Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
                the persona formerly known as Anahita
              • Susan B. Farmer
                ... Thanks! jerusha ... Susan Farmer sfarmer@goldsword.com University of Tennessee Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
                Message 7 of 10 , Mar 8, 2007
                  Quoting Lilinah <lilinah@...>:

                  > jerusha wrote:
                  >> I know that the cornucopia is greco-roman -- what's the earliest
                  >> depiction of the "modern" cornucopia? Does it occur within the SCA
                  >> period? I'm not sure how to go about tracking something like this down.
                  >
                  > Look into Renaissance Italy, as that was the time and place that
                  > revived of Greco-Roman imagery, philosophy, mythology, etc.
                  > (re-interpreted, of course)
                  >

                  Thanks!
                  jerusha
                  -----
                  Susan Farmer
                  sfarmer@...
                  University of Tennessee
                  Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
                  http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
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