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Re: baby clothes patterns: Uncledom

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  • tasha_medvedeva
    ... I ve always seen it spelled armsceye -- it means armhole. ... {snip} ... Before you cut the neckhole, of course. Pin a square larger than the desired
    Message 1 of 20 , Feb 21, 2007
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Rosie" <Rosie_0801@...> wrote:
      >
      > > You can take measurements off of her clothes, but I'd say only use
      > it for
      > > the shoulder width, length, and arm length... not for the arm
      > sythe, around
      > > the arm, or for around the body (unless you're going to build in
      > pleats that
      > > you can remove if she's bigger than you made it).
      >
      > What does arm sythe mean?

      I've always seen it spelled armsceye -- it means armhole.

      >
      > > Babies really need the underarm gusset. You'll also want to make
      > > the garments so that they button at the neck or in the back, since
      > > babies generally have really large heads and for something made of
      > > linen to fit over the head but stay on the shoulders, it's much
      > > simpler to just make it button a couple of times either in the
      > > front or on the shoulder.
      >
      > What size gusset do you think? I'm only a beginner seamstress, so
      > don't have the experience to judge. I use 10cm squares for myself.
      > I'm thinking of making keyhole necks so her head will fit through.
      > How does one do the facing for that though?
      {snip}
      > Rosie- Oh the joys ahead :)
      >

      Before you cut the neckhole, of course. Pin a square larger than the
      desired neckhole onto the right side of the tunic, centered left to
      right, with 2/3 of the fabric in front of the shoulder line and 1/3 to
      the back (your neck is not centered front to back on your shoulders,
      after all). Trace the exact shape of the neckhole onto the facing
      fabric, then stitch around the outside of it with the presser foot
      riding along the edge of the tracing. Then clip out the hole, flip
      the facing to the inside, press, and top stitch.

      If you want a keyhole, draw a line, and stitch along the edge, a
      couple of stitches across the bottom, and back up, then continue along
      the circle.

      For contrasting facings, pin the fabric to the inside of the tunic.
      Obviously, this is best done before the side seams are stitched. I
      like to do it before I put on the sleeves -- less fabric to wrangle
      through the sewing machine.

      Tasha
    • Elizabeth Walpole
      ... I m guessing somebody s spellchecker has been at work on that one and turned it from armsceye to arm scythe. Elizabeth ... Elizabeth Walpole | Elizabeth
      Message 2 of 20 , Feb 21, 2007
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        >> What does arm sythe mean?
        >
        > I've always seen it spelled armsceye -- it means armhole.
        >
        I'm guessing somebody's spellchecker has been at work on that one and turned
        it from armsceye to arm scythe.
        Elizabeth
        --------------------------------------------
        Elizabeth Walpole | Elizabeth Beaumont
        Canberra, Australia | Politarchopolis, Lochac
        http://au.geocities.com/e_walpole/
      • mary_m_haselbauer
        Bibs are period. I can t recall having seen a picture of one but there s a literary mention cited in Orme s Medieval Children. The ones I made were a square of
        Message 3 of 20 , Feb 22, 2007
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          Bibs are period. I can't recall having seen a picture of one but
          there's a literary mention cited in Orme's Medieval Children. The ones
          I made were a square of terry cloth with two flatwoven ties.
          I'm only posting this picture of the kiddo to illustrate the bib.
          Really. :)
          http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d79/BabyGirlH/HPIM2716.jpg

          Soft linen would have been more period but the terry cloth catches a
          whole lot more.

          One of the linen underdresses I made for her had a slit for a neckhold
          that went from middle of her chest to the middle of her back. Then the
          overdress had more of a boatneck. Between the two of them her
          shoulders were covered and I didn't have to fuss with any buttons. The
          thing about a keyhold neck on a very little baby is that the front
          slit has to go down to the bellybutton to be big enough for the head.

          Cheers,
          Slaine
          B3R Calontir




          > What size gusset do you think? I'm only a beginner seamstress, so
          > don't have the experience to judge. I use 10cm squares for myself.
          > I'm thinking of making keyhole necks so her head will fit through.
          > How does one do the facing for that though? Just the same way as
          > usual? Also thought the apron dress idea would be good too. That way
          > she can smear stuff all over herself during the day, and I can just
          > pop on another so she'll look respectable for dinner :)
          > Rosie- Oh the joys ahead :)
          >
        • Sandra Dodd
          -= The thing about a keyhold neck on a very little baby is that the front -=- Put the slit in the back and work ties into the facing, or use ribbon and fasten
          Message 4 of 20 , Feb 22, 2007
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            -= The
            thing about a keyhold neck on a very little baby is that the front -=-

            Put the slit in the back and work ties into the facing, or use ribbon
            and fasten the ribbons by sewing one long ribbon in such a way that
            both ends are out.

            (Thinking of how to describe this in words, having done it several
            times...)

            Picture a 24" long ribbon.

            Lay it vertically along the edge of the opening of the garment,
            pinned in the middle, both ends loose. Sew down the middle 3" or so.
            and the two ends are loose now, 10" or so long (knot the ends or make
            a diagonal cut).

            Do the same on the other side, and you can make two bows.

            You can do that twice on something long, and not just for baby
            clothes but for overdresses for older children so that as they get
            older they can just be tied more loosely.

            There are some photos of babies in garb, but not patterns, here:
            http://sandradodd.com/duckford/children
            Nothing shows that tie-fastening thing specifically, but it's solid
            and attractive. The ribbons have never come off.

            AElflaed




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          • Dianne & Greg Stucki
            ... Riiiight. And even though I have no babies left at home to dress (my youngest is 5, and they re all boys) I only looked to see the bib. ;-) She s precious.
            Message 5 of 20 , Feb 22, 2007
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              At 10:52 AM 2/22/2007, you wrote:
              >I'm only posting this picture of the kiddo to illustrate the bib.
              >Really. :)
              ><http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d79/BabyGirlH/HPIM2716.jpg>http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d79/BabyGirlH/HPIM2716.jpg


              Riiiight. And even though I have no babies left at home to dress (my
              youngest is 5, and they're all boys) I only looked to see the bib. ;-)

              She's precious. And I love the walker.

              Laurensa



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            • Rosie
              ... Argh! This sounds hard! No wonder I haven t put facings into any of my tunics yet! Cool, well I ll find someone who can deal with spacial problems since I
              Message 6 of 20 , Feb 22, 2007
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                > Before you cut the neckhole, of course. Pin a square larger than the
                > desired neckhole onto the right side of the tunic, centered left to
                > right, with 2/3 of the fabric in front of the shoulder line and 1/3 to
                > the back (your neck is not centered front to back on your shoulders,
                > after all). Trace the exact shape of the neckhole onto the facing
                > fabric, then stitch around the outside of it with the presser foot
                > riding along the edge of the tracing. Then clip out the hole, flip
                > the facing to the inside, press, and top stitch.
                > If you want a keyhole, draw a line, and stitch along the edge, a
                > couple of stitches across the bottom, and back up, then continue along
                > the circle.
                > For contrasting facings, pin the fabric to the inside of the tunic.
                > Obviously, this is best done before the side seams are stitched. I
                > like to do it before I put on the sleeves -- less fabric to wrangle
                > through the sewing machine.

                Argh! This sounds hard! No wonder I haven't put facings into any of my
                tunics yet! Cool, well I'll find someone who can deal with spacial
                problems since I can't at present, then we'll have the best dressed
                baby in, uh, our house...
                Thanks!
                Rosie
              • tasha_medvedeva
                ... {snip of instructions} ... Hard? Au contraire -- it s a hell of a lot easier than cutting the holes first and trying to sew them without them skewing and
                Message 7 of 20 , Feb 22, 2007
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                  --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Rosie" <Rosie_0801@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > Before you cut the neckhole, of course.
                  {snip of instructions}
                  >
                  > Argh! This sounds hard! No wonder I haven't put facings into any of my
                  > tunics yet! Cool, well I'll find someone who can deal with spacial
                  > problems since I can't at present, then we'll have the best dressed
                  > baby in, uh, our house...
                  > Thanks!
                  > Rosie
                  >

                  Hard? Au contraire -- it's a hell of a lot easier than cutting the
                  holes first and trying to sew them without them skewing and making you
                  swear.

                  Print out my instructions and try it with practice fabric. Follow
                  them exactly, with just a simple circle first, and I think you'll see
                  how simple they are. I'd post a tutorial with pictures, but I'm
                  leaving Sunday for a business trip and I have a lot to do between now
                  and then.

                  Tasha
                • Sandra Dodd
                  -=-Argh! This sounds hard! No wonder I haven t put facings into any of my tunics yet!-=- http://sandradodd.com/duckford/sewing There s a very clear diagram of
                  Message 8 of 20 , Feb 22, 2007
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                    -=-Argh! This sounds hard! No wonder I haven't put facings into any
                    of my
                    tunics yet!-=-

                    http://sandradodd.com/duckford/sewing

                    There's a very clear diagram of how the facings work, from an old
                    hippie sewing book from the 70's.

                    It really is easier than it sounds.

                    AElflaed of Duckford



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                  • tasha_medvedeva
                    ... My only argument with this method is that they have you cut and unpin, then repin the facing and sew it. I also think that they have a centered neckhole,
                    Message 9 of 20 , Feb 22, 2007
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                      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Sandra Dodd <Sandra@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > -=-Argh! This sounds hard! No wonder I haven't put facings into any
                      > of my
                      > tunics yet!-=-
                      >
                      > http://sandradodd.com/duckford/sewing
                      >
                      > There's a very clear diagram of how the facings work, from an old
                      > hippie sewing book from the 70's.
                      >
                      > It really is easier than it sounds.
                      >
                      > AElflaed of Duckford

                      My only argument with this method is that they have you cut and unpin,
                      then repin the facing and sew it. I also think that they have a
                      centered neckhole, which I find really uncomfortable and drafty. It's
                      a lot easier to sew the circle before you cut the hole, and IMO the
                      neckhole should be slid towards the front of the garment.

                      The pictures are helpful, though.

                      I'm going to look through my Flickr account; I think I might have
                      photos of how I do neck facings.

                      Tasha
                    • Sandra Dodd
                      -=-My only argument with this method is that they have you cut and unpin, then repin the facing and sew it. I also think that they have a centered neckhole,
                      Message 10 of 20 , Feb 22, 2007
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                        -=-My only argument with this method is that they have you cut and
                        unpin,
                        then repin the facing and sew it. I also think that they have a
                        centered neckhole, which I find really uncomfortable and drafty. It's
                        a lot easier to sew the circle before you cut the hole, and IMO the
                        neckhole should be slid towards the front of the garment.-=-

                        Yeah, I do it toward the front, and I cut and finish the outside
                        edge of the facing, while it's flat, and then sew it on, and *then*
                        cut the neck out of the main garment.

                        I usually face the facing and turn the whole thing to the outside...
                        but I don't want to frighten and dismay someone who's not done a
                        facing by talking about that.

                        Sandra

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                      • tasha_medvedeva
                        ... {snip} ... Found it, and I carved out some time to add captions and notes to the pictures. I would like to note that while I do use a sewing machine to
                        Message 11 of 20 , Feb 22, 2007
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                          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "tasha_medvedeva"
                          <tasha_medvedeva@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Sandra Dodd <Sandra@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > -=-Argh! This sounds hard! No wonder I haven't put facings into any
                          > > of my
                          > > tunics yet!-=-
                          > >
                          > > http://sandradodd.com/duckford/sewing
                          > >
                          > > There's a very clear diagram of how the facings work, from an old
                          > > hippie sewing book from the 70's.
                          > >
                          > > It really is easier than it sounds.
                          > >
                          > > AElflaed of Duckford
                          >
                          {snip}
                          >
                          > I'm going to look through my Flickr account; I think I might have
                          > photos of how I do neck facings.
                          >
                          > Tasha
                          >

                          Found it, and I carved out some time to add captions and notes to the
                          pictures. I would like to note that while I do use a sewing machine
                          to topstitch, I embroider over the stitching with a stem stitch
                          afterwards (I didn't hand sew because time was of the essence, and
                          this way at least it would be done and I could embroider over the
                          stitching at my leisure).

                          http://www.flickr.com/photos/tashabear/sets/72157594551079483/

                          Enjoy.

                          Tasha
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