Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: question re canes

Expand Messages
  • jubileel_insaneone
    MODERATOR NOTE, PLEASE DO NOT TOP POST - PLEASE EDIT YOUR POSTS SO OUR MEMBERS DO NOT HAVE TO READ THE SAME MESSAGE MORE THAN ONCE. THANK YOU. A 15th c
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      MODERATOR NOTE, PLEASE DO NOT TOP POST - PLEASE EDIT YOUR POSTS SO OUR MEMBERS DO NOT HAVE TO READ THE SAME MESSAGE MORE THAN ONCE. THANK YOU.

      A 15th c painting showing canes:

      http://www.freewebs.com/isabelladangelo/sassetta_st_anthony_1440_dog.jpg

      The only reason I remember that painting is because of the cavalir
      king charles puppy dog in it. :-)

      -Isabella

      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Gedney" <gedney@...> wrote:
      > Canes are period. Use one if you need one.
      >
      > Capt Elias
      >
    • Sandra Dodd
      Staff, or walking stick, are native English terms. Staffs could be used for walking or for knocking guys into streams, if art and literature are to be
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Staff, or walking stick, are native English terms. Staffs could be
        used for walking or for knocking guys into streams, if art and
        literature are to be trusted.


        The word "cane" came into English later (and more on "cane" in a bit).

        The terms "bent cane" is used, so that implies they weren't all
        necessarily crooked.

        A crook, a bent cane/stick, is another thing to consider. Some were
        for hooking lambs or music hall performers. But some were walking
        crooks--like a crutch. Archbishops use them still, right? Or
        Bishops? (Somebody does...)

        There's thought to have been a legal concept involving "hook or
        crook." Estates had rights that went with them, as to tolls or
        income or hunting or wood gathering. Sometimes people could not cut
        firewood, but they could have what wood they could get "by hook or
        crook," meaning if they could reach into the tree with a tool and and
        pull some deadwood down, okay.


        I looked up "crutch." It's a really old word: "Common Teutonic,"
        says the Oxford English Dictionary.

        I can't transcribe from that book anymore. There was a time when my
        eyes were good enough, but I can't hold the magnifying glass and
        type. But the early definitions talk about walking staffs. So in
        the 10th century the word didn't necessarily mean a stick with a
        horizontal piece on it. There are two origin words they think
        might have come to bear on the English word. One survives in our
        "crouch"--to need to stoop some. The other is "crutch/crotch"--a
        place where a tree forks. Long, long before people had crotches,
        trees had lots of crotches, and people who were building barns and
        houses knew which were good for what. Long before people made lumber
        out of trees and then made things from lumber, people looked at the
        details of trees to find things already "made," already grown. There
        were parts of trees that were used for post and beam construction,
        and for hooks on walls (an upright beam might be chosen because it
        had a branch coming out that could be used as roof support or a hook).

        Having read through what the OED says for "cane," I wouldn't use it
        for SCA purposes. The plant "cane" but because of sugar cane. The
        first example of use under the definition of a walking stick is
        discussion of people using them to swat other people. That's
        probably still the first meaning in England (not in the U.S., where
        people might've been whipped or spanked or paddled, but they weren't
        so much "caned"). It's past the period about which you inquried
        that the term "cane" meant a little bent walking stick, but you can
        use a little bent walking stick and call it a walking stick or a crook.

        AElflaed
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.