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Re: Early Knitting & Crochet! - Nesat VI

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  • Chris Laning
    ... I had a chance to look at NESAT VI and Zarina (one of the sources cited) at a friend s house this weekend. The knitting reference is a good one, but I
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 5, 2006
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      At 3:55 PM +1000 9/3/06, Tyghra na Tintagel passed on the following:
      >
      >> There are naalbinded gloves and mittens from the Riga excavations, one
      >> of which has been reconstructed and is on the Latvian Museum of
      >> History website at
      >>
      >http://www.history-museum.lv/english/media/mosaic/atdari/gloves.jpg
      >>
      >> The earliest knitted mitten and glove in Latvia (to my knowledge)
      >>date from the 15th century, and their patterns have been published.
      >>(The pattern for the glove is online at
      >
      >http://www.liis.lv/majtur/darbmac/tokt/01.jpg)
      >
      >> If anyone wants the pattern of the reconstructed mitten, I'm happy
      >>to upload that and post a link. :)
      >>
      >> My main source for this is M. Slava's "Latviesu rakstainie cimdi"
      >> (Riga: Zinatne, 1990) ISBN: 5 7966 0190 3
      >>
      >> I hope this information helps,
      >> Asfridhr
      >>
      >>
      >> "That knitting has an old tradition in the Baltic states is evident from
      >> archaeological data of Latvia and Estonia (Peets 1987, 105-16; Zarina,
      >> Caune 1980, 60-9). In cultural layers of Riga, dated to the 12th-15th
      > > centuries, woollen gloves and mittens were found. Some of them were
      >> knitted and others were crochetted with a small bone needle."
      >> ( from pg 283, "Holiday Clothing of Lithuanian Country Women in the
      > > 15th-16th centuries" by Saule Urbanaviciene in NESAT 6)
      >
      >> This references:
      >> Peets J., 1987: 'Totenhandschuhe im Bestattungsbrauchtum de Esten und
      >> anderen Ostseefinnen'. Fenoscandia Archaeologica. IV. Helsinki. 105-16
      >>
      >> Caune A., Zarina A., 1980: 'Rigas 13.-15. gs. vilnas cimdi'.
      > > Latvijas PSR zinatnu akademijas vestis, Nr.1 (39), 60-9.

      I had a chance to look at NESAT VI and Zarina (one of the sources
      cited) at a friend's house this weekend. The knitting reference is a
      good one, but I expect someone or other may pounce on the part that
      says:
      >"...woollen gloves and mittens were found. Some of them were
      > knitted and others were crochetted with a small bone needle."
      > ( from pg 283, "Holiday Clothing of Lithuanian Country Women in the
      > 15th-16th centuries" by Saule Urbanaviciene in NESAT 6)

      There are ample grounds for not taking the word "crochetted"
      literally here. My guess is that it probably refers to nalbinding,
      which in context would make a lot more sense, especially since it's
      said to be worked with a "needle."

      Judging by the fact that all of the references to Saule
      Urbanaviciene's article are in Lithuanian, I strongly suspect that
      the English article in NESAT is a translation. While I don't speak
      Lithuanian <g>, Eastern European languages in general are notoriously
      difficult to translate accurately into English when it comes to
      needlework terms. There isn't a one-to-one correspondence between
      their terms and the English terms that refer to ways of making fabric
      other than weaving, so words that are translated "netting,"
      "knitting", "crochet", and so forth always need to be double-checked
      to be sure the correct equivalent is being used. This has been
      discussed on the [HistoricKnit] mailing list.

      --
      ____________________________________________________________

      O Chris Laning <claning@...> - Davis, California
      + http://paternoster-row.org - http://paternosters.blogspot.com
      ____________________________________________________________
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