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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Stalled out

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  • Folo Watkins
    The last time I commented on this, I received death threats from a few quarters (not this forum) who chose to read personal attacks into what I wrote. Please
    Message 1 of 41 , Aug 3, 2006
      The last time I commented on this, I received death threats from a few
      quarters (not this forum) who chose to read personal attacks into what I
      wrote. Please don't. This is my opinion, and I will not go around picking
      on anyone who does not share it!

      >I haven't been on for a while (life is being very busy right now) but
      >I'm still interested in presenting a more authentic face to my SCA
      >hobby. Unfortunately, I can't just wave a magic wand and make all my
      >gear authentic and I feel like everything I want to do is going to take
      >a long time and the prospect is making me depressed.

      Attaining accuracy in living history is an evolutionary journey. Nobody
      starts out right--unless they're rich, which begs the question of why
      they're doing this--and no one reaches the end. There is always *one* more
      thing (and, of course, new information and reinterpretations).


      >Does anyone have suggestions on little things that make a big
      >difference in being more authentic? If you could give one suggestion
      >to all the average SCA members who have a combination of SCA gear and
      >modern stuff and period-oid things, what would it be?

      Concentrate on your personal costume and kit before all else. That's what
      you're going to be presenting in public areas. From shoes to hat, try to
      get that impression correct before worrying bout anything else. Then worry
      about seating and anything else in your day camp. Replace furniture and any
      day flies. Then worry about any camping equipment. There is no sin in
      having a modern tent; your camp should be private. Take care, if possible,
      not to put modern tents among accurate tentage.

      And for God's sake, don't draw attention to any farb by making it look
      "period-esque." That's one of my greatest pet peeves. A lawn chair, a straw
      bale, a pimple tent, etc. with a cozy over it looks like a lawn chair, a
      straw bale, a pimple tent, etc. with a cozy over it. A scooter with a horse
      head on it attracts more attention than an unadorned but necessary scooter
      and hasn't looked novel or cute in a decade! Just accept it, try to replace
      it in the future and devote time, money and energy toward things that are
      accurate. And when you do get accurate furniture and tentage, make certain
      that you don't leave farb just showing. What is in the tent does not exist!
      You can have a refrigerator and air conditioning in there for all I care;
      just don't leave the Coleman cooler sitting outside!

      I started a Flickr group, http://www.flickr.com/groups/farbfest/, which has
      pics of inappropriate scenes, many from Pennsic, ranging from the heinous
      to the tweak-worthy. I expect to get a few more in a few days and I would
      love to see others uploading pix of bad examples as well. Just remember, in
      the words of the Inspector General from my RevWar group, we are not
      rejecting the person...just his kit!

      Good luck!

      Cheers, Folo
    • lilinah@earthlink.net
      ... Thanks for the helpful hints :-) I used to live with a custom cabinetmaker. He had a beautiful old mitre box for making those lovely cuts that make parts
      Message 41 of 41 , Aug 7, 2006
        At 4:50 AM -0700 07/08/06, Geoffrey Schemel wrote:
        >If you can manage a small drill you can manage a jig saw which is
        >the only other tool you'd need to make a 6 board chest, 4 board
        >benches, and a table A circular saw would be a nice to have that
        >allow you to make the larger cuts faster; but a jig will get you
        >there.

        Thanks for the helpful hints :-)

        I used to live with a custom cabinetmaker. He had a beautiful old
        mitre box for making those lovely cuts that make parts fit together
        so nicely.

        I'll never be able to do what he did, but i do think i could handle a jig saw.

        >If you want, I'm working on some plans that I'd be happy to pass
        >along to you if you ever care to give it a try.

        I would appreciate it. Note that i cannot manage anything heavy, as i
        have some physical issues, but a moderate sized box i can probably
        do... and i'd like to learn to do inlay and veneer to spiff up the
        top surface.
        --
        Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
        the persona formerly known as Anahita
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