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Re: [SCA-JML] Fwd: Sake making

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  • wodeford
    ... The source doesn t sound particularly reliable. Now, I have to confess that I am in the middle of relocating and can not do too well at citing sources at
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 24 10:01 PM
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      --- In sca-jml@yahoogroups.com, Solveig Throndardottir <nostrand@...>
      wrote:
      > I did some research on it while checking on the Silk Road for a story
      > I was doing and found out:
      > It was first brewed in China in the area or town of Shaoxing from
      > which it takes it's Chinese name. Then later it moved to Japan where
      > it was called sake. Most farmers kept their best rice aside to sell
      > to the brewers or to brew themselves as the process is very simple.
      > I don't know when it arrived in Japan but it as early for the three
      > first occupations created by mankind are the soldier, the prostitute
      > and the brewer so it was well established long before Hein times.

      The source doesn't sound particularly reliable. Now, I have to
      confess that I am in the middle of relocating and can not do too well
      at citing sources at the moment. However, I believe that there was a
      Chinese travel account which describes the Japanese and their sake
      brewing technique. I do not believe that their technique (ca 300 CE)
      was particularly similar to the Chinese technique of the time.
      Supposably, the Japanese had virgins masticating boiled rice and
      spitting it into a vat to ferment. The process for brewing sake is
      complicated by the need to convert starch into sugar prior to
      fermentation. Apparently the mastication by virgins achieved this.
      Today, a particular microbe (which I do have the name for) acts as
      the active ingredient of koji to convert starch into fermentable
      sugars. Actual fermentation can take place using either wild or
      cultivated yeast.

      Your Humble Servant
      Solveig Throndardottir
      Amateur Scholar

      --- End forwarded message ---
      Forwarded by Jehanne de Wodeford.

      Sorry Faolan, nobody seems to be able to lay their hands on actual
      books, so far.
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