Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Got Scots?

Expand Messages
  • E S
    Hello, I m new (if you couldn t tell). I just wanted to explain my situation and see what everybody has to say. I do not currently belong to SCA, I m just
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello, I'm new (if you couldn't tell). I just wanted to explain my situation and see what everybody has to say. I do not currently belong to SCA, I'm just testing the waters, and thinking about a persona. I'm mostly interested in early scotland, though not sure how early yet. As it happens my hair is red and in very messy dredlocks, and I believe this might have been accurate to a certain time period but I'm not sure exactly when. I have found some info about garb from this general place/time, but nothing about food and very little about life for the lower or middle classes. More often, info on the upper class seems to be better preserved, or it may just be that this info is more popular.
      In short, if anyone can recomend good resources for an early scottish woman of middle or lower class it would be much appreciated.
      -Elena


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kevin Myers
      Failte dhuibh Elena, What part of scotland are you thinking of placing your persona? From the 6th century on, there were Picts in the east and north, Scots
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 3, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Failte dhuibh Elena,

        What part of scotland are you thinking of placing your persona? From
        the 6th century on, there were Picts in the east and north, Scots (from
        Ireland)in Argyle, Angles in Lothian and the Southeast, and Britons in
        Strathclyde, Galloway and stretching into Cumbria, all living in what
        we call scotland today. Starting in the early 9th century you may add
        norwegians to this mix in the outer hebrides, shetlands, orkneys and
        most northern tip of mainland scotland. This question is of more
        importance for early personae than later since these peoples were more
        distinct from one another before the high middle ages.

        -Cainnech Ruad mcGuairi



        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Meurig ap Cynfarch
        MODERATOR NOTE: PLEASE DO NOT TOP-POST TO THIS LIST THANK YOU In 843, a united Kingdom of Scotland was created under the rule of Kenneth I, who ruled over both
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 3, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          MODERATOR NOTE:
          PLEASE DO NOT TOP-POST TO THIS LIST
          THANK YOU

          In 843, a united Kingdom of Scotland was created under the rule of
          Kenneth I, who ruled over both the Scots and Picts. The Kingdom of
          Strathclyde remained a seperate entity until the 11th century, when
          finally became part of Scotland.

          As Failte said, you get to choose which of the "Scottish" peoples your
          persona belongs to. This is what makes early personas so much fun.
          Early mediaeval history is full of migrations, different peoples
          interacting with one another. All these peoples and cultures will
          ultimately merge over the centuries for form the national "identities"
          we know today.

          Meurig ap Cynfarch
        • E S
          MODERATOR NOTE: PLEASE DO NOT TOP-POST TO THIS LIST THANK YOU I am most interested in the Scots, so Argyle would be a good place to start or possibly further
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 3, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            MODERATOR NOTE:
            PLEASE DO NOT TOP-POST TO THIS LIST
            THANK YOU


            I am most interested in the Scots, so Argyle would be a good place to start or possibly further north. I think it would be before the norwegians showed up. At least for now that's what I'd like to concentrate on. I have been able to find some info on clothing and language, but not much else.

            Thanks for the help. -Elena
          • Kevin Myers
            ... Alrighty then, the Scots came from Ireland to Southwest Scotland in the end of the 5th century. They remained culturally Irish but after a few
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 3, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              :) BTW, Got Scots=An ann Albannach?

              --- E S <xxso_glad_for_the_madnessxx@...> wrote:

              > I am most interested in the Scots, so Argyle would be a good place to
              > start or possibly further north. I think it would be before the
              > norwegians showed up. At least for now that's what I'd like to
              > concentrate on. I have been able to find some info on clothing and
              > language, but not much else.

              Alrighty then, the Scots came from Ireland to Southwest "Scotland" in
              the end of the 5th century. They remained culturally "Irish" but after
              a few generations, Pictish name elements started appearing in the names
              of their kings. The 8th century wasn't too kind to the Scots, they got
              bashed about by the Picts on several occasions and eventually came to
              be ruled by them in the late 8th century to early 9th century.

              The 7th century document "Senchus Fer nAlban" is a census of the
              nobility and their military might (See John Bannerman's "Studies in the
              History of Dal Riata"). This document suggests continued legal and
              cultural ties with Ireland at that time.

              So, what may have been is an Irish cultural group with gradually
              increasing Pictish/Strathclyde British and Anglic influence and Pictish
              domination. (But wait...you've heard that a Dal Riatic King united the
              Picts and the Scots in about 842? That's right, after the death of the
              Pictish king Constantine son of Fergus in about 820 there was a
              dynastic struggle in which Kenneth (Cinniod, Cinaet, Cinaed or Kinart)
              macAlpin was victorious--He just happened to be a Scot)

              For purposes of research I'd recommend looking at Irish sources (The
              law tracts are a fantastic source for Irish culture/society and some
              material culture) also look at pictish and strathclyde british . The
              Life of St. Columba by Adomnan; the Book of Deer; the Senchus fer
              nAlban; the Book of Kells are good source material. A Guide to Early
              Irish Law as well as Early Irish Farming by Fergus Kelly are both
              excellent and up to date works. I found the Handbook of the Scottish
              Gaelic World to be very good. Studies in the History of Dal Riada by
              John Bannerman is indispensible. The Early Christian Monuments of
              Scotland details pictish art and stone carvings, fascinating stuff.

              For garb, start with Old Irish and Highland Dress by H.F. McClintock
              and Highland Dress by John Telfer Dunbar.

              For other gear, etc. I've found Archaeology of Late Celtic Britain and
              Ireland by Lloyd Laing to be good--there have since been more finds of
              course. Dunadd: An Early Dalriadic Capital by Alan Lane and Ewan
              Campbell is the publication of the most recent arch. digs that were
              performed at the site in the 80's-90's (?).

              Good overview books: The Picts and the Scots by Lloyd and Jenny Laing;
              Picts, Gaels and Scots by Sally M. Foster; Saints and Sea-Kings by Ewan
              Campbell.

              Linguistic resources--Etymological Dictionary of Scottish-Gaelic by
              Alexander mcBain; A Grammar of Old Irish by Rudolf Thurneysen (you'll
              want Binchy's english translation as the original was written in
              German); and Dwelly's Illustrated Gaelic to English Dictionary.

              There. You have your reading assignments, and the rest of your life to
              study :) Have fun!

              -Cainnech ruadh mcGuairi
              OL

              __________________________________________________
              Do You Yahoo!?
              Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
              http://mail.yahoo.com
            • E S
              Thanks, I guess I better get to work =) -Elena [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 4, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks, I guess I better get to work =)

                -Elena


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.