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primary documentation for linen "underpartlet"?

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  • msgilliandurham
    Greetings to the list, and apologies for cross-posting -- I m trying to document the white linen partlet -- the kind that was supposedly worn to fill in the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 22, 2006
      Greetings to the list, and apologies for cross-posting --

      I'm trying to document the white linen partlet -- the kind that was
      supposedly worn to fill in the neck of a square-necked shift, not the
      kind worn over the shoulders of a bodice.

      I'm finding lots of mentions of it, but they are all of the
      "Elizabethan women wore these" or worse, "you can't tell if this is a
      partlet or a high-necked shift" kind. No mention of any existing
      garments, no mention of pictures of them or references to them in
      letters or inventories.

      Does anyone here know of any *proof* that this garment existed?

      Thanks so much,
      Gillian Durham
    • Catelli, Ann
      ... Queen Elizabeth of England was given many partlet & sleeve sets, I believe for the New Year, which were all written down diligently. So, try Queen
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 22, 2006
        > I'm trying to document the white linen partlet -- the kind that was
        > supposedly worn to fill in the neck of a square-necked shift, not the
        > kind worn over the shoulders of a bodice.
        >
        > I'm finding lots of mentions of it, but they are all of the
        > "Elizabethan women wore these" or worse, "you can't tell if this is a
        > partlet or a high-necked shift" kind.
        >
        > Gillian Durham

        Queen Elizabeth of England was given many partlet & sleeve sets, I believe for the New Year, which were all written down diligently.
        So, try Queen Elizabeth's Wardrobe Unlocked by Janet Arnold for better indications of where the contemporary records may be found.


        Ann in CT
      • msgilliandurham
        ... believe for the New Year, which were all written down diligently. ... better indications of where the contemporary records may be found. Excellent --
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 22, 2006
          > > I'm trying to document the white linen partlet[...]
          > > Gillian Durham

          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Catelli, Ann" <ACatelli@...>
          wrote:
          > Queen Elizabeth of England was given many partlet & sleeve sets, I
          believe for the New Year, which were all written down diligently.
          > So, try Queen Elizabeth's Wardrobe Unlocked by Janet Arnold for
          better indications of where the contemporary records may be found.

          Excellent -- that's what I'm looking for, thank you!
          Gillian Durham
        • Karen
          ... These are some of the New Year s partlet gifts (from Nichols Progresses of Queen Elizabeth): By the Earle of Warwike, a smocke wrought with black silk, a
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 23, 2006
            Ann wrote:

            > Queen Elizabeth of England was given many partlet & sleeve sets,
            > I believe for the New Year, which were all written down diligently.

            These are some of the New Year's partlet gifts (from Nichols' Progresses of Queen Elizabeth):

            By the Earle of Warwike, a smocke wrought with black silk, a peire of slevis, and a partelett wrought with gold, silver, and black silke. (1561/1562)

            By the Lady Cobham, a partelett and a peire of sleeves of sypers wrought with silver and blak silke. (1561/1562)

            By the Lady Shandowes, a peire of sleeves and a partlett of gold and silver knytt, cawle fashion. (1561/1562)

            By the Lady Cycell, a partelett and a peire of sleves wrought with roundells of gold frienge, and drawen owte with syphers. (1561/1562)

            By the Lady Woodhouse, a partelet a peire of sleves wroght with gold and silk, tufted out with cameryk. (1561/1562)

            By Mr. Harrington, a piere of sleves and a partelett, embrodered with gold and silver sett with pearles. (1561/1562)

            By the Lady Marvyn, two parteletts of networke, thone floreshed with golde, thother with silver. (1577/1578)

            By Elizabeth Knowlls, a fore parte, boddies, and partelet of sipers, cryppen work. (1577/1578)

            By Jane Byssetts, a partlet, a peir of ruffs, and a peir of cuffs of lawne, wrought with black sylke and silver, and the partelet floreshed with golde and silver set with spangills. (1577/1578)

            By Mrs. Bissels, a partelet and ruffs of lawne wrought with white worke, with a blake sipers upon yt, gar' wythe bewgles. (1578/1579)


            Whether the "partlet" here is indeed the dickey-like garment you're looking for or not is unclear from most of the descriptions above; it seems not entirely impossible, though.

            (I'm not sure I'd consider these "primary documentation"; at best, they're a description of the ornamentation of a garment, but it's not like the inventory provides much in the way of pointing you towards the actual garment in question. But perhaps the descriptions above provide inspiration towards how one might ornament such a garment, or the materials from which one might have been made. This posting is a tertiary source material; see http://www.geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/using_the_internet.htm for information on how to cite it in a bibliography in an MLA-based citation system.)

            Karen
          • msgilliandurham
            ... diligently. ... Progresses of Queen Elizabeth): Thank you so much for typing all this out! What a lot of work -- I really appreciate it! ... of lawne,
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 23, 2006
              --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Karen <karen_larsdatter@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Ann wrote:
              >
              > > Queen Elizabeth of England was given many partlet & sleeve sets,
              > > I believe for the New Year, which were all written down
              diligently.
              >
              > These are some of the New Year's partlet gifts (from Nichols'
              Progresses of Queen Elizabeth):

              Thank you so much for typing all this out! What a lot of work -- I
              really appreciate it!

              > By Jane Byssetts, a partlet, a peir of ruffs, and a peir of cuffs
              of lawne, wrought with black sylke and silver, and the partelet
              floreshed with golde and silver set with spangills. (1577/1578)
              >
              > By Mrs. Bissels, a partelet and ruffs of lawne wrought with white
              worke, with a blake sipers upon yt, gar' wythe bewgles. (1578/1579)

              HA! These two sound more hopeful.

              > Whether the "partlet" here is indeed the dickey-like garment you're
              looking for or not is unclear from most of the descriptions above; it
              seems not entirely impossible, though.

              I would agree. I'd be happier if we had some extant garments, or
              pictures of same (like the "aping the fashion" engraving as
              documentation for detachable ruffs) but at least this is on the right
              track.

              Thank you again -- Gillian Durham
            • Karen
              ... No problem; I typed it out four years ago for just this sort of eventuality. ;) See http://geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/gifts/ for the complete lists.
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 23, 2006
                Gillian wrote:

                > Thank you so much for typing all this out! What a lot of work -- I
                > really appreciate it!

                No problem; I typed it out four years ago for just this sort of eventuality. ;) See http://geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/gifts/ for the complete lists.

                Karen
              • msgilliandurham
                ... eventuality. ;) See http://geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/gifts/ for the complete lists. Ah, so *that s where it is! I ve recently found your website with
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 24, 2006
                  --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Karen <karen_larsdatter@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Gillian wrote:
                  >
                  > > Thank you so much for typing all this out! What a lot of work -- I
                  > > really appreciate it!
                  >
                  > No problem; I typed it out four years ago for just this sort of
                  eventuality. ;) See http://geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/gifts/ for
                  the complete lists.

                  Ah, so *that's where it is! I've recently found your website with all
                  its wonderful primary documentation of pictures -- I was wondering
                  how I'd missed that list.

                  Thank you so much for putting up all those links -- it's a great
                  resource. I'll be referencing it for some of the classes I'm hoping
                  to teach.

                  Thanks again -- Gillian Durham
                • Nest verch Tangwistel
                  ... the ... is a ... There is a color picture of an existent partlet at the Victoria and Albert Museum in the book Elizabethan Embroidery by George Winfield
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 24, 2006
                    --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "msgilliandurham"
                    <msgilliandurham@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Greetings to the list, and apologies for cross-posting --
                    >
                    > I'm trying to document the white linen partlet -- the kind that was
                    > supposedly worn to fill in the neck of a square-necked shift, not
                    the
                    > kind worn over the shoulders of a bodice.
                    >
                    > I'm finding lots of mentions of it, but they are all of the
                    > "Elizabethan women wore these" or worse, "you can't tell if this
                    is a
                    > partlet or a high-necked shift" kind. No mention of any existing
                    > garments, no mention of pictures of them or references to them in
                    > letters or inventories.
                    >
                    > Does anyone here know of any *proof* that this garment existed?
                    >
                    > Thanks so much,
                    > Gillian Durham
                    >

                    There is a color picture of an existent partlet at the Victoria and
                    Albert Museum in the book "Elizabethan Embroidery" by George
                    Winfield Digby (keeper of textiles, Victoria and Albert Museum)1964.
                    The section about the partlet says the following:

                    "The coloured Plate A shows an embroidered partlet or chemise-front
                    which is still in astonishingly fresh condition. It has a
                    naturalistic pattern of strawberries, pansy, foxglove, cornflower
                    and borage, which has been worked to the shape of the neck; its
                    small dimensions indicate that it was for a child. Worked in gold
                    thread and silk, in plaited braid, hollie and chain stitches, this
                    is one of the loveliest and freshest pieces of Elizabethan constume
                    embroidery to come down to us."

                    The picture does not show the entire piece, just a close up of th
                    embroidery. Therefore it is hard to determine exactly how it would
                    have been worn. You can't see the bottom edge to see how it is
                    finished. Even with the slightly ambiguous discription, it is the
                    best I have been able to find. I hope this helps.

                    Nest verch Tangwistel
                    East Kingdom
                  • m d b
                    ... In Germany both types of partlet are called a Goller. But they are differenciated by the type. There are also accounts for materials used to make them.
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 24, 2006
                      > Greetings to the list, and apologies for cross-posting --
                      >
                      > I'm trying to document the white linen partlet -- the kind that was
                      > supposedly worn to fill in the neck of a square-necked shift, not the
                      > kind worn over the shoulders of a bodice.


                      In "Germany" both types of partlet are called a Goller. But they are
                      differenciated by the type. There are also accounts for materials used
                      to make them. Try Textiler Hausrat, or if you don't have access to the
                      book and can't read German there are translated section at the
                      Germanrencostume list here on yahoo.

                      Willemyne/Michaela
                      http://glittersweet.com
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