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Re: Picnic / feasting while "on campaign" and without the medieval comforts of home...

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  • llewin@comcast.net
    MODERATOR NOTE: PLEASE DO NOT TOP-POST THANK YOU Great question! Here is a related one: What sorts of fowl were commonly used during the 1400s (or just
    Message 1 of 6 , May 26, 2006
      MODERATOR NOTE:
      PLEASE DO NOT TOP-POST
      THANK YOU

      Great question!

      Here is a related one:

      What sorts of fowl were commonly used during the 1400s (or just generally throughout the Middle Ages) and...what modern equivalents have those of you who enjoy cooking found work well as substitutes? I was thinking Gam Hens?

      I will be preparing a camp-feast for my household/friends total about 15 adults/teens/children total and am just starting to throw ideas together. I should have around 50 dollars to work with.

      Any ideas? :)

      Thanks!

      --
      Yours In Service to the Dream,

      Llewin de Wales

      http://www.sca.org/
    • msgilliandurham
      ... generally throughout the Middle Ages) and...what modern equivalents have those of you who enjoy cooking found work well as substitutes? I was thinking Game
      Message 2 of 6 , May 26, 2006
        --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, llewin@... wrote:
        > What sorts of fowl were commonly used during the 1400s (or just
        generally throughout the Middle Ages) and...what modern equivalents
        have those of you who enjoy cooking found work well as substitutes? I
        was thinking Game Hens?

        Game Hens are great substitutes, but they are *very* modern --

        see http://homecooking.about.com/library/weekly/aa101199.htm

        I'm remembering manorhouses having dovecotes -- and of course there's
        whatever you brought home from hawking -- and duck and geese. Not
        sure about pheasant -- and I'm thinking the quail you get frozen a
        dozen in a box are not quite the same as medieval partridges -- but
        they are probably a lot closer than game hens.

        Check the food files on the Florigium -- there's a number of
        discussions on various types of poultry.

        And back to the orginal thread -- an article from the Florigium
        on "Tourney Baskets" --

        http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD/Tourny-Basket-art.html

        YIS -- Gillian Durham
      • Margaret Northwode
        ... Alternately, if you ve got the space, grow your own. Even full-grown quail, at livestock auction, I m told is reasonable at $2/bird (live). Quail requires
        Message 3 of 6 , May 26, 2006
          On 5/26/06, msgilliandurham <msgilliandurham@...> wrote:
          > --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, llewin@... wrote:
          > > What sorts of fowl were commonly used during the 1400s (or just
          > generally throughout the Middle Ages) and...what modern equivalents
          > have those of you who enjoy cooking found work well as substitutes? I
          > was thinking Game Hens?
          >
          > Game Hens are great substitutes, but they are *very* modern --
          >
          > see http://homecooking.about.com/library/weekly/aa101199.htm
          >
          > I'm remembering manorhouses having dovecotes -- and of course there's
          > whatever you brought home from hawking -- and duck and geese. Not
          > sure about pheasant -- and I'm thinking the quail you get frozen a
          > dozen in a box are not quite the same as medieval partridges -- but
          > they are probably a lot closer than game hens.
          >
          > Check the food files on the Florigium -- there's a number of
          > discussions on various types of poultry.
          >
          > And back to the orginal thread -- an article from the Florigium
          > on "Tourney Baskets" --
          >
          > http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD/Tourny-Basket-art.html
          >
          > YIS -- Gillian Durham

          Alternately, if you've got the space, grow your own. Even full-grown
          quail, at livestock auction, I'm told is reasonable at $2/bird (live).
          Quail requires a tallish soop - some 10' to 12' tall - in order to get
          full breasts, they need to fly, so rtimming feathers or wings isn't a
          good alternative.

          Duck is more expensive, adult. It's much cheaper to either buy the
          chicks and raise them or purchase them frozen and ready to thaw and
          use.

          Pheasants - I've been told to not expect the pretty, long feathers on
          domestically raised pheasant, and like quail, they need to develop
          breast muscles.

          Margaret Northwode
        • Cynthia J Ley
          ... Chicken, geese, doves, pheasants, peacocks, among others. Arlys
          Message 4 of 6 , May 26, 2006
            > What sorts of fowl were commonly used during the 1400s (or just
            > generally throughout the Middle Ages) and...what modern equivalents
            > have those of you who enjoy cooking found work well as substitutes?
            > I was thinking Gam Hens?

            Chicken, geese, doves, pheasants, peacocks, among others.

            Arlys
          • Cynthia J Ley
            ... Pheasant was something folks hunted for--I get the impression that peacocks and quail were raised. Arlys
            Message 5 of 6 , May 26, 2006
              > > I'm remembering manorhouses having dovecotes -- and of course
              > there's
              > > whatever you brought home from hawking -- and duck and geese. Not
              > > sure about pheasant -- and I'm thinking the quail you get frozen a
              > > dozen in a box are not quite the same as medieval partridges --
              > but they are probably a lot closer than game hens.

              Pheasant was something folks hunted for--I get the impression that
              peacocks and quail were raised.

              Arlys
            • Susan B. Farmer
              Quoting llewin@comcast.net: If you re interested in this sort of thing, you want to find a book titled Early English Meals and Manners compiled by Frederick
              Message 6 of 6 , May 27, 2006
                Quoting llewin@...:

                If you're interested in this sort of thing, you want to find a book
                titled "Early English Meals and Manners" compiled by Frederick J.
                Furnivall in 1894. It is a compilation of various 14th and 15th
                century books ... Subtitled: "John Russell's Boke of Nurture, Wunkyn
                de Worde's Boke of Kervynge, The Boke of curtasye, R. Weste's Booke of
                Demeanor, Seager's Scoole of Vurtue, The Babees Book, Aristotle's A B
                C, Urbanitatis, Stans Puer ad Mensam, The Lytylle Childrenes Lytil
                Boke, for to serve a Lord, Old Symon, The Birched School-Boy, &t, &c
                with some Forewards o Education in Early England." It *is* available
                through ILL.

                >
                > What sorts of fowl were commonly used during the 1400s (or just
                > generally throughout the Middle Ages) and...what modern equivalents
                > have those of you who enjoy cooking found work well as substitutes? I
                > was thinking Gam Hens?
                >

                partriche (partridge), stokdove, chekyne, goos, teele, Mallard, Ospray,
                & also swanne, capon & hen of hawt grees [full plump, goodlie, fat,
                well-fed, in good liking], Feysaunt, partriche, poluer, lapewynk,
                wodcok, Betowre [bittern], Egret, Synte [snipe], and Curlew,
                heyrounsew, Crane, pecok, stork, bustarde, & Shovellewre, Quayle,
                sparrow, larke, litelle, mertinet, pygeon, swalow, thrusche, osulle

                This book, John Russells Book of Nurture, is "recent" enough to be
                English, but old enough that the "letter" "thorn/eth" [yeah, I never
                can remember which one is the "theta" and which one looks like a "p"]
                is used fot "th" -- and "u" is represented by "v" and vice versa. I've
                seen a date for this book, but at the moment, I can't find one.

                "Of quayle / sparow / larke / & litelle / mertinet, pygeoun / swalow /
                thrusche / osulle / ye not forgete, pe legges to ley to your souereyne
                ye not forgete, pe legges to ley to your souereyne ye no lette, and
                afturward pe whyngus if his lust be to etc."

                Jerusha
                -----
                Susan Farmer
                sfarmer@...
                University of Tennessee
                Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
                http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
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