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Re: Tudor food and a TOTAL SUBJECT CHANGE to Spinning thread.

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  • msgilliandurham
    ... [...] but my girlfriend ... [...] ... I know when I was a child (back before the earth cooled, as my mother used to say) you could buy garments made from
    Message 1 of 7 , May 3, 2006
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "Lyle H. Gray" <gray@...> wrote:
      >
      > On Wed, 3 May 2006, Justin wrote:
      >
      [...] but my girlfriend
      > > suggested that if it was a rarer material or an unusual color
      > > of dye they probably did thread reclaimation and spun up and
      > > wove all new fabric.
      [...]
      > > It occurs to me this could be the main source of all the crazy
      > > linen/wool blends we keep reading about but have difficulty
      > > defining.

      > Wool, maybe -- I don't work old wool enough to know.
      >
      > Linen, probably not. The fibers break down over time (which is a
      > benefit to me, since I'm collecting linen rags for papermaking
      > experiments), so I don't think that respinning fibers from the
      > old cloth would be that useful.

      I know when I was a child (back before the earth cooled, as my mother
      used to say) you could buy garments made from "reprocessed" wool.
      IIRC, this was wool from old garments which had been processed back
      into fiber, respun, and woven into new cloth. This is why you get
      labels on things saying "100% *virgin* wool" (ta-da! whoop de do!) to
      indicate that none of the fiber in the garment, blanket, whatever, is
      reprocessed. Actually haven't seen the reprocessed label in a while,
      still see the virgin wool label.

      Reprocessed wool was scratchier and less desirable, but cheaper.

      Were the blends we are discussing here, *spun* blends (linen and wool
      spun into one yarn) or wool one way and linen the other (warp/weft?) I
      knew that about linsey woolsey for about 5 seconds once :-)

      If spun together, blending might make the yarn, and hence the fabric,
      stronger -- since re-carded wool would have shorter fibers and be less
      strong.

      Gillian [talking through her hat] Durham
    • Adele de Maisieres
      ... Actually, I believe _weaving_ was done by professionals for most of the middle ages. -- Adele de Maisieres ... Habeo metrum - musicamque, hominem meam.
      Message 2 of 7 , May 3, 2006
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        Justin wrote:

        >Now back in the day, the
        >middle classes could buy a new outfit once in a while I suppose, and the
        >poorer classes had to weave and sew new clothes them selves.
        >
        Actually, I believe _weaving_ was done by professionals for most of the
        middle ages.

        --
        Adele de Maisieres

        -----------------------------
        Habeo metrum - musicamque,
        hominem meam. Expectat alium quid?
        -Georgeus Gershwinus
        -----------------------------
      • kelyn_of_broceliande
        ... mother ... to ... is ... while, ... The first time I d seen a reprocessed label was on a fairly new Army blanket a couple years ago. Had to explain to my
        Message 3 of 7 , May 4, 2006
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          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "msgilliandurham"
          <msgilliandurham@...> wrote:
          > I know when I was a child (back before the earth cooled, as my
          mother
          > used to say) you could buy garments made from "reprocessed" wool.
          > IIRC, this was wool from old garments which had been processed back
          > into fiber, respun, and woven into new cloth. This is why you get
          > labels on things saying "100% *virgin* wool" (ta-da! whoop de do!)
          to
          > indicate that none of the fiber in the garment, blanket, whatever,
          is
          > reprocessed. Actually haven't seen the reprocessed label in a
          while,
          > still see the virgin wool label.

          The first time I'd seen a reprocessed label was on a fairly new Army
          blanket a couple years ago. Had to explain to my mother
          that "contains reprocessed fibers" is NOT the same as "not pure
          wool."

          >
          > Reprocessed wool was scratchier and less desirable, but cheaper.
          >
          > Were the blends we are discussing here, *spun* blends (linen and
          wool
          > spun into one yarn) or wool one way and linen the other
          (warp/weft?) I
          > knew that about linsey woolsey for about 5 seconds once :-)

          I THINK linsey-woolsy is linen one way and wool the other, but I
          can't recall where I read that and I may be confusing it with
          something else.

          -- Kelyn
        • msgilliandurham
          ... According to the Hamilton Dry Goods page (and I trust them to know) What is Linsey-Woolsey? Our Linsey-Woolsey is a reproduction of an original 200-year
          Message 4 of 7 , May 5, 2006
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            --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, "kelyn_of_broceliande"
            <kelyn_of_broceliande@...> wrote:
            > I THINK linsey-woolsy is linen one way and wool the other, but I
            > can't recall where I read that and I may be confusing it with
            > something else.

            According to the Hamilton Dry Goods page (and I trust them to know)
            " What is Linsey-Woolsey? Our Linsey-Woolsey is a reproduction of an
            original 200-year old fabric and it has flax-linen threads in one
            direction and wool threads in the other direction."

            So the linen isn't spun *with* the wool, to make that yarn stronger.

            Gillian Durham
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