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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Doll Advice, please

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  • Bookwyrm
    ... No might. Definite. :-) ... A flat doll? Like a stuffed gingerbread man or Raggedy Ann, rather than a soft sculpture one? Do you know of any nude
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 4 6:18 PM
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      On 04/04/06, Sue Warner <ashgrove@...> wrote:
      > You mention that you might recloth the doll anyway,

      No might. Definite. :-)

      > Why not go one step farther and just make a "flat doll" and then
      > cloth it.

      A flat doll? Like a stuffed gingerbread man or Raggedy Ann, rather
      than a soft sculpture one? Do you know of any nude period doll
      pictures, other than the wooden stump dolls (which I doubt modern
      children would stood to enjoying and, besides, carving is not one of
      my skills)?

      That's actually a good idea. I could add a subtle 'tattoo' somewhere
      to help it find its way home if it got lost, too . . .

      > Best of all though -- it could be made from all scrap fabric. (and
      > none of us have *any* of that laying around, right?)

      Err, no. *shifty eyes* None at all.

      Would linen be suitable, do you figure, or silk? Probably silk would
      demand better workmanship. Stuffed with wool, or beans? I should be
      looking this up myself, but where?

      --
      Bookwyrm and Empath
      Ontario, Canada
    • Catelli, Ann
      ... Look up at the British Museum site a rag doll from Oxrhynchus from about the third century a.d. The part of the site to look up is called Compass, but I
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 5 1:40 PM
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        > On 04/04/06, Sue Warner <ashgrove@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Why not go one step farther and just make a "flat doll" and then
        > > cloth it.
        >
        > A flat doll? Like a stuffed gingerbread man or Raggedy Ann, rather
        > than a soft sculpture one? Do you know of any nude period doll
        > pictures, other than the wooden stump dolls (which I doubt modern
        > children would stood to enjoying and, besides, carving is not one of
        > my skills)?
        >
        > Would linen be suitable, do you figure, or silk? Probably silk would
        > demand better workmanship. Stuffed with wool, or beans? I should be
        > looking this up myself, but where?
        >
        > Bookwyrm

        Look up at the British Museum site a rag doll from Oxrhynchus from about the third century a.d. The part of the site to look up is called Compass, but I don't remember the search parameters that worked.

        The doll is about 8"/20cm tall, with papyrus & linen stuffing & linen cover; it may have wool embroidery for face &/or hair.

        I think the body/head was made by wodging (technical term) the papyrus & linen into a shape vaguely resembling a person, and covered with four separate pieces for head front & back and torso front & back, and something ran short, so there's a tiny piece covering the back (?) neck.

        The arms are made of rolled-up linen, and the legs are folded over like a binding with a minor bit of stuffing (more linen or papyrus, I expect).

        There is a blue glass bead for an earing on the (proper) left side of the head.

        The linen is coarse; the stitching crude; I'm quite sure the doll's young owner adored her.



        A few wood figures, a few metal, and some paintings containing dolls do survive.


        I don't have my canned speech about why there aren't any surviving cloth dolls between this Egyptian (Coptic Christian/late Roman empire) example and (iirc) the eighteenth century.
        A rag doll is made of worthless material.
        It's only ever prized by its young owner, who grows up & forgets it, or fails to grow up, and no one is left to remember it.
        The doll is made of linen probably, which doesn't survive in the vast majority of European conditions, or wool, which isn't much better.


        Heather Rose Jones, on this list, has a much better canned speech regarding this, where she tries to find every bit of textile fragment surviving & since found in Europe.

        Ann in CT
        Cecilia Dollmaker
      • Karen
        There s some pictures of period dolls (and other playthings) at http://geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/toys.htm -- see also
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 6 6:19 AM
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          There's some pictures of period dolls (and other playthings) at http://geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/toys.htm -- see also http://www.geocities.com/atlrespaper/dolls.html for additional pictures and information.

          Karen
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