Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Period way to prevent fabric freying?

Expand Messages
  • roisinaisolde
    Thank you for your replies. I am very grateful. Roisina
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Thank you for your replies. I am very grateful.

      Roisina
    • kareina@inthe.sca.org
      It may not be quite as useful in linen, but I have enjoyed playing with the technique mentioned in _Woven into the Earth_, which may be called singling (my
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        It may not be quite as useful in linen, but I have enjoyed playing with
        the technique mentioned in _Woven into the Earth_, which may be called
        "singling" (my copy of the book is at home, so I'm relying on my less than
        perfect memory for names), which the archaeologists didn't discover until
        the light hit the stitches just right while they were examining the edges
        of the fabric under the microscope.

        If I recall correctly, that was worked on wool, and the stitching ran in
        an undulating pattern along the edge of the fabric, effectively holding
        the outermost thread both to the ones next to it, but also to the ones
        which intersect it.

        I tried this once on a nice herringbone twill wool I'd been given, and
        then machine-washed and dried it before cutting out the tunic, and there
        was no fraying whatsoever, despite the fact that before I did the
        stitching the fabric looked like it would be easy to fray.

        --Kareina


        Roisina wrote:

        > Can someone suggest some period ways to prevent fabric freying?
        > Normally I would use Freycheck.
        >
        > I am making a medieval underdress in linen.
      • kelyn_of_broceliande
        ... surviving ... period ... a ... each ... of ... Ah-ha! This is EXACTLY what I wanted to ask about. So glad that I found this post the very day I joined
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 4, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In Authentic_SCA@yahoogroups.com, Heather Rose Jones
          <heather.jones@...> wrote:
          > Someone's already pointed you at my web article on seams in
          surviving
          > period textiles. To summarize: seams in linen garments in
          period
          > were overwhelmingly finished in such a way that there were no raw
          > edges. Methods could include flat felled seams, seams covered by
          a
          > "tape" with the edges folded under, or seams formed by turning
          each
          > edge into a rolled or turned "hem", and then overcasting the edges
          of
          > these hems together.
          >
          > Tangwystyl


          Ah-ha! This is EXACTLY what I wanted to ask about. So glad that I
          found this post the very day I joined this group (not long after
          reading your article on seams, which I found useful, too). I'm
          about to start work on a 5th-century "Roman-era Brit" tunic for a
          friend, and this is NOT my usual period at all, so I don't know what
          sort of seams -- and seam finishes -- are right. I prefer to finish
          seams by folding each seam allowance over and hemming, but I don't
          know if this is right, and as the friend in question has
          specifically requested something of "Living History" quality (and I
          am SO glad that someone finally wants that, instead of telling me
          that I'm wasting my time when "zipping it together on a serger"
          would do well enough, 'cause it won't!)... Anyway... Please, can
          you tell me if hemming down each seam allowance is right for a 5th
          century man's tunic, or should I do something else?
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.